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Searching for: +path:black-dutch-america
Viewing 1-25 of 6,599 matches from 40,277,566 documents1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 | Next

1. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins and family legends [1]
Myra and All, I kept the article regarding the man in Denton County, Texas. It was in the June 11, 2006 edition of the Dallas Morning News. It was the cover story in the Sunday Life section. It was called "Reclaiming His Heritage" by Paul Knight. The man being interviewed and who mentioned "Black Dutch" is named Onor "Bouncer" Goin. At the time of the interview, he was on a dialysis machine 10 hours a day. He is probably dead by now. Here is an excerpt from the article: "Some people (Cherokee
2. [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins [1]
I've long been interested in the "Black Dutch" origins in American families and have done a lot of research in trying to determine any common threads among the families that make this claim. In more recent times (thanks or curses to the Internet) the term has been taken by various "groups" and used to claim everything from mixed-bloods all sorts of exotic origins. Like many family legends, it can be difficult to prove or disprove. However, for the most part, most of us who have researched more than one fam
3. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins [1]
Hi Anja, What a history! It would be wonderful if you could document the whole ancestry. Of course, this could be very hard in performing the paper trail but it's always worth trying since there could be wonderful information lurking out there just waiting to be discovered. From what I can "see" in your writings, you have a gut feeling or intuition that this part of the family (Mom's father's) was probably black. And you have a fair chance that it could be. The only way you could get a positive on t
4. [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] goins family [1]
I too have that newspaper article about the Goins family. I'll have to dig it out, and re-read it. I grew up in that Texas area,near Denton. If I remember rightly, the grandmother died, and the family found old handwritten documents, and photos she had saved, and hid under the bed, or in the wall--don't remember which. There are probably some of the family still living in that little town who know all of this. My maternal grandmother was called 'black dutch'. She never mentioned it, but some of the f
5. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins [1]
Thank you, Myra. That's one part of the mystery I can lay to rest. I have one of your articles about Black Dutch bookmarked. Are there more online? Rainwater reseachers have told me that the family was in England prior to the 18th century emigration. Before that they were from what is today Germany. Perhaps that ties in with the "Low German" aspect of Black Dutch. I am fascinated by the stories from different families regarding their own Black Dutch identities. Thanks to everyone. Cindy McLaughlinDrip
6. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins and family legends [1]
This is a true story about the family the Denton man speaks of, who had Cherokee heritage. I am from that part of Texas. I do have their names, and photos, which I saved from older local newspaper clippings. I can look through my genealogy boxes and find them. I can almost remember the family names--but they elude me at the moment. I'll look for my info, and post it soon. It is an interesting story. Apparently old documents,and photos were found after the Grandmother's death. Descendants still live in
7. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins and family legends [1]
What a fascinating story about your heritage, Marie. Thanks so much for sharing it. I have one brief comment about why a family might want to pretend they were not Native American. When I was 14, I asked my grandfather Rainwater if our name was Indian (this was before we said Native American). He became agitated and replied that we were most certainly not Indian. "Indians don't have souls." Deeply ignorant, yes. But not an uncommon belief in Texas in the 1800's when my grandfather grew up. As they sing in "
8. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins and family legends [1]
I look forward to learning more about this Texas family and others who claim Black Dutch heritage. --Myra Vanderpool Gormley > This is a true story about the family the Denton man speaks of, who had > Cherokee heritage. I am from that part of Texas. I do have their names, > and photos, which I saved from older local newspaper clippings. I can > look through my genealogy boxes and find them. I can almost remember the > family names--but they elude me at the moment. I'll look for my info, and > p
9. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins and family legends [1]
About ten years ago, the NARA (National Archive and Records Admin.) records were much easier to access and when I was researching my lineages here, I discovered that in 1896-97, the members of the Five Civilized Tribes, i.e., Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, Chocktaw and Seminole Nations and were offered "US Citizenship" if they gave up their "Indian Sovereignty". This meant that they completely gave up their identity of being N.A. and any holdings thereof and all record of this were eliminated. I have h
10. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins [1]
My family has a similar story. I posted it once before I don't believe I recieved any replies, so I assume it's safe to post some of it again. When I was younger I asked my mom about her maternal grandmother's heritage and she mentioned she used to hear it was "Dutch." Later on she said she was pretty sure she heard Black Dutch but her and her brother always assumed it meant Dutch. The reason my g-grandma's heritage was of particular interest to me was because I heard a story about her being asked to mo
11. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] goins family [1]
I may be stating something everyone knows already, but I read that Goins (and its variations) is a Melungeon name. What is the connectionm if any, between Meluneons and Black Dutch? Cindy McLaughlinDripping Springs TX > From: santafarr@msn.com> To: black-dutch-america@rootsweb.com> Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2008 06:38:55 +0000> Subject: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] goins family> > I too have that newspaper article about the Goins family. I'll have to dig it out, and re-read it. I grew up in that Texas area,near Denton
12. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins [1]
Greetings Everyone, Myra-thank you! This is something I also heard as a final anaylsis of the term. I would also like to add one more nugget to this thought: I heard that the term also was coined in the late 1700's when the Native American round-ups were in motion and the Quakers would take in fleeing Native people, pass them off to the pursuing militia as "Black Dutch" who spoke gutteral German, making them impossible to question and therefore safe from capture. This was particulary mentioned in th
13. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins [1]
I am fascinated by all the theories regarding "Black Dutch" and it's true meaning. My grandfather on my father's side was said to be Black Dutch. He had black hair and very dark complexion. His mother was German. Our family always interpreted the term to mean he inherited darker German looks due to the region of the country his mother's people came from. She had many children and an old photo of all of them shows clearly who inherited the dark hair and complexions. Interestingly, she did not se
14. [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] Rainwater Family [1]
Hello, I was on this list several years ago. I am checking back in to see the current thoughts on the label Black Dutch. My story is pretty common. My family didn't speak much about the family history. My mother did tell me once that her maiden name, Rainwater, was originally a Dutch name. She also stated with great conviction, "We are Black Dutch." She went on to say our family was from the Netherlands, originally, and were of a darker complexion than usual. She likened it to the Black Irish (Irish interm
15. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins and family legends [1]
What would be interesting would to be to learn the surnames of this family the man in Denton, Texas claims were Cherokee and learn how it was that he was able to trace them. However, this story sounds so similar to the "three brothers came to America" legend that has been told often -- and without any genealogical evidence to back it up -- that I question it. If you look at the story more closely, why would anyone believe it? Just because I claim to be German doesn't make it so. What reasons did this
16. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins and family legends [1]
Thank you for sharing your story, Marie. Most interesting. Some of my early Dutch lines were in that area in the 17th century and removed to New Netherland. If I recall correctly, slavery was abolished in Suriname (formerly the Netherlands Guiana) in 1863, but it took additional 10 more years to complete the process. It would be interesting to read more about these intermixed families. Here's some links to the National Archives online pertaining to the 5 Civilized Tribes: Lists of people accepted bet
17. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins [1]
Myra, Thanks much for your insight. My maternal line is Burkett and our ancestors also claimed to be "Black Dutch". We know for sure that they were in the south Georgia, south Alabama and the pan handle of Florida by the early 1800's. We also understood the Burkett's were of German origins. When they got to Texas they married into the Zeagler (German) family. Floyd Boyett ----- Original Message ----- From: "Myra Vanderpool Gormley" To: Sent: Thu
18. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] Rainwater Family [1]
That reminds me of what my grandmother told me about my family being Black Dutch. Her explanation was we were intermarried via Spaniards and the people of the Netherlands. I, too, would love to know more about this facinating and confusing heritage. Stubby Cindy McLaughlin wrote: Hello, I was on this list several years ago. I am checking back in to see the current thoughts on the label Black Dutch. My story is pretty common. My family didn't speak much about the
19. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] origins [1]
Dear Myra, My grandfather (Tenn to Oklahoma origens) claimed to be "Black Dutch" and a little bit of everything else. He was such a tease that I never thought about what he meant. I thought that during World War I or the war to end all wars (would that it had been so) the people of German descent claimed Black Dutch as they also renamed Sour Kraut to Liberty Cabbage and other things of that ilk. Thank you for all your research-genealogy and history fascinate me. Mary Jean Robertson. -----Original Mess
20. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] BLACK DUTCH SURNAME SITES [1]
--WebTV-Mail-11607-4459 Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit Thanks for the great sites Turtle. hugs ant Joyce --WebTV-Mail-11607-4459 Content-Disposition: Inline Content-Type: Message/RFC822 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit Received: from mailsorter-101-7.iap.bryant.webtv.net (209.240.198.41) by storefull-266.iap.bryant.webtv.net with WTV-SMTP; Fri, 5 May 2000 11:58:12 -0700 (PDT) Return-Path: Received: from bl-14.
21. [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] RE: Bonnett [1]
Turtle Send me the Ohoto of the Bonnett Please ~ Alece ~
22. [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] Cherokee [1]
Cherokee North American Indian people of Iroquoian lineage who inhabited eastern Tennessee and the western Carolinas. Formerly they had lived around the Great Lakes, migrating to the south after their defeat by the Delaware and Iroquois. Their population in 1650 has been estimated at 22,500, spread over 40,000 square miles (100,000 square km) of the Appalachian Mountains. Cherokee life and culture greatly resembled that of the Creek and other Indians of the Southeast. The Cherokee nation was com
23. Re: [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] Johnsons of Lincoln Co. NC [1]
In a message dated 5/22/00 2:24:56 PM Eastern Daylight Time, debjacks_2000@yahoo.com writes: << Joel Johnson, I think from Georgia, married Margaret ??? Had children Ambrose and Margaret M. b. ca. 1810 Lincoln Co. TN. Family says Margaret was Cherokkee. I can't find anything about the family. Also, does anyone know anything about Elizabeth Feathers who married Richard Parsons? One source says she was English and another says she was a descendant of "Big Chief Feathers". >> Debbie, I have you on
24. [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] Niantic [1]
Niantic Algonquian-speaking woodland Indians of southern New England. The Eastern Niantic lived on the western coast of what is now Rhode Island and on the neighbouring coast of Connecticut. The Western Niantic lived on the seacoast from Niantic Bay, just west of New London, to the Connecticut River. Once one tribe, they were apparently split by the migration of the Pequot into their area. The Western Niantic were nearly destroyed by the Pequot War (1637), and remnants joined the Mohegans. The East
25. [BLACK-DUTCH-AMERICA] Word look-up [1]
1ab7orig7i7nal adjective Pronunciation: "a-b&-'rij-n&l, -'ri-j&-n&l Date: 1667 1 : being the first or earliest known of its kind present in a region 2 a : of or relating to aborigines b often capitalized : of or relating to the indigenous peoples of Australia synonym see NATIVE - ab7orig7i7nal7ly adverb source info Encyc. Britta. 2000 MJ

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