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From:
Subject: Deportation ships part I
Date: Fri, 13 Apr 2001 21:36:32 EDT


In a message dated 4/13/01 11:02:15 AM Central Daylight Time,
writes:

"I just read you article on the Acadian-Cajun page and I think that you did
an excellent job, but where is the rest of it? There were other ships that
were not included. Are they in some other location? This listing only goes
up to the Neptune. Have you finished this report or what? I would really
like to see the rest of it."

==========================
Yes there is quite a bit more to the article. There are an additional 20 or
more ships described in the article.
The complete article is being published in the Journal of the Vermont
Fremnch-Canadian Genealogical Society. The Editor is Mike Sevigny and he is
doing an excellent job of cleaning it up and organizing the sources, etc.

In addition, I have been able to obtain a copy of the following article on
the ships that carried the Acadians from Ile St. Jean in 1758 by Earle
Lockerby
Deportation of the Acadians from Ile St. Jean to England , in 1758:

By Earle Lockerby
Fall-Winter 1999 Edition of THE ISLAND MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby


"The fate of Ile ST. Jean was sealed on the 26 July 1758 when Governor
Augustin de Boschenry de Drucour surrendered the fortress at Louisbourg,"

"On 8 August Lt. Col. Andrew Rollo was ordered by the commander of British
forces, Major General Jeffrey Amherst to proceed from Louisbourg to Ile St.
Jean and arrange for the capitulation of its small French garrison. All of
the settlers and the garrison where to be taken to Louisbourg where they
would be transshipped to France."

The schooner "Hind" and 4 transports "King of Prussia", "Bristol", "Dunbar"
and "Catherine" set out on 10 August 1758 arriving on the 17 August.

On the 31 August the 4 transports left for Louisbourg with 692 passengers,
130 of which were administrative and military personnel and their families.
4,000 setters still remained on the Island. Among these was the French
commander Gabriel Rousseau de Villejouin. They arrived on the 4 September.
The officers and other military personnel were placed on the "HMS York"; the
civilians probably from the Hillsborough River area were placed aboard the
"Mary". The English expected approx. 400 to 500 inhabitants on the Island,
instead Rollo estimated 4000 to 5000, ten times that number. He sent for more
transports. Admiral Edward Boscawen ordered 14 more vessels to Ile St. Jean.
They were "Briton", "Duke William", "John and Samuel", "Mathias", "Neptune",
"Parnassus", "Patience", "Restoration", "Ruby", "Supply", "Tamerlane", "Three
Sisters", "Violet" and "Yarmouth". The "Restoration" was the smallest, 177
tons, "Duke William" the largest, 400 tons. They set out from Louisbourg on
14 September and arrived at Ile ST. Jean on the 3 October. On the September
Boscawen ordered the "Richard and Mary", "Scarborough" and another "Mary"
(not the previous one which is assumed was on its way to France) to the
Island.

Rollo was busy rounding up the settlers on the Island, the villages of Pointe
Prime, Tracadie Bay, Savage Bay and St. Peters Bay. Not everybody turned
themselves in. Rollo reported that "numbers have fled to Canada and carried
off great quantities of cattle by means of 4 Schooners which ply from Magpec
(sic, Malpeque) to ye continent." A schooner mounting 6 guns was assisting
the people to escape. Most, if not all of them escaped to the north shore of
New Brunswick, principally the inner reaches of Chaleur Bay and Miramichi
area. Father Jacques Girourd of Pointe Prime and a fair number of his
parishioners where embarked on the "Duke William". A final count of the
prisoners was 2,415, not including those sent earlier to Louisbourg. At least
600 were left behind due to the lateness of the season and the need to get
the transports to France. Some of these 600 were too sick or diseased to be
placed on the ships but the majority of them were the residents of Malpeque
on the West Side of Malpeque Bay. (Malpeque is presently located on the East
Side of Malpqeue bay).

The "Hind" left on 4 November with her flotilla; the "Hind", "Briton" and
"Richard and Mary" were headed to Louisbourg, the others for France. The
"Tamerlane and "Parnassus" were driven aground during a squall, the
"Tamerlane" was refloated but the "Parnassu" was wrecked. The "Richard and
Mary" carrying British soldiers hit a rock near Ile Madame and sank. No lives
were lost during these mishaps. The "Tamerlane" was the first to reach a
French Port, on the 16 January 1759, 54 passengers disembarked at St Malo.

On the 23 January the "John and Samuel", "Mathias", "Patience" "Restoration"
and "Yarmouth" unloaded between 665 and 690 passengers. The "Supply" reached
the English port of Biddeford about 20 December, and on the 2 March it
unloaded 140 passengers at St. Malo. The "Neptune" reached Portsmouth around
23 December, her provisions exhausted and her passengers sick. The "Three
Sisters" also reached France without mishap. The names, ages, and family
relationships of the passengers aboard the "Tamerlane", "Supply" and the five
Vessels that reached port on the 23 January 1759 are all known. Also known
are the names of a few passengers aboard a transport, which ended up at
Boulogne. The sinking of the "Violet" on the 12 December with no survivors
and of the "Duke William" on the 13 December with 34 British sailors, Captain
Nichols, Father Girard, surviving in the boats cutter and long boat.
They left behind the William's jolly boat, 4 male prisoners launched the
jolly boat before she sunk. They made it safely to Falmouth. It is not
exactly known how many died on the "Violet" and "Duke William" Estimate 300
to 400 for each vessel. On the 23 January the "Ruby" ran aground on the
Island of Pico in the Azores. 123 French and 23 English were saved. A
Portuguese schooner "St. Catherine" took 87 French passenger to Portsmouth,
arriving 4 February 1759. A week later they were shipped to France. In both
cases of the "Duke William" and the "Ruby" all or virtually all the crew were
saved. Father Girard claimed one other transport was wrecked, on the coast of
Spain. But he may have confuses it with the "Ruby". Also although the loss of
life was heavy due to drowning, the loss of life from disease
and sickness was undoubtedly more. The 600 ton "Mary" (560 passengers, when
she left Louisbourg on 27 September), arrived at Portsmouth on 31 October
with a large number of her passengers suffering from "Malignant Distemper".
The Captain reported he had buried 250 to 260 passengers at sea, mostly
children. The survivors were taken to Cherbourg in the latter half of
November.

Yes the manifest of passengers and crew would have gone down with the Violet,
however where the captain and/or crew survived, the mainfests would of been
saved, The captain survived from the "Duke William" and from the "Ruby". In
fact the log of the Hind was used as a resource for Earle Lockerby's article
onthe Acadian deportationof Ile St. Jean. Also I thought it was standard
procedure to leave a copy of the ships manifest at the Port where the voyage
starts. (Help if there are any mariners out there who monitor this list).

The "Tamerlane lost 10% of its passengers during the crossing, the "Mary"
45%. The five ships that reached St. Malo had a average mortality rate of 33%,

Transport # Passengers Death by Disease Death by Drowing
Total Deaths

Duke William 400 100 296
396
Violet 360 90
270 360
Ruby 310 77
113 190
Supply 165 25 25
John and Samuel
Mathias
Patience 1020 342 342
Restoration
Yarmouth
Tamerlane 60 6 6
Mary 560 25 255
Other 225 75 75

3100 970 679
1649

Approx 1600 Island Acadians avoided the deportation, of whch 100 to 200
remained on the Island.

Of the 9 transports that safely reached France or England 4 of them were
still inactive service 4 years after the deportation. They were also not
generally overcrowded. Ships bringing Scotish settlers to the Maritimes in
the 1770's averaged .8 to 1.0 passenger to burden ratios. The Acadian
transports averaged .9 intended. (Had all the Acadians on the Island been on
board.) They actually averaged .6 when they left Ile St. Jean. Due to the
wrecks in the Strait of Canso, the burden climbed to about .8 . The Acadian
deportation of Port Royal and al averaged 2.0 and in at least one instance
was 2.9. Also Rollo did not have the Acadian building burnt like the Nova
Scotia deportation. In 1764 Holland enumerated 398 homes, 2 churches and nine
mills on the Island. Amherst (The man) stated that he would have had the
settlements on the Island absolutely destroyed.

==========================
Sources of Information Earle Lockerby, Deportation of the Acadians from Ile
St. Jean - The Island magazine Fall Winter 1999 - More detail can be found
in the Spring 1998 edition of Acadiensis magazine.

The ships that are reported to have transported the Acadians from the Bay of
Canso to St. Malo France were:
________________________________________________________________________

ANTELOPE
Class, Tonnage and Captain unknown.

Ile Royale (Cape Breton), Ile St-Jean (Prince Edward Island) and then to ST
MALO, France. The ANTELOPE, disembarked at St. Malo on November 1, 1758. No
additional information about the ANTELOPE is known to the writer at this time.
__________________________________________________________________________

BRISTOL
Class, Tonnage and Captain unknown

The transport "Bristol", set out on 10 August 1758 arriving on the 17 August
and left for Louisbourg on the 31 August 1758 and arrived on the 4 September
(Deportation of the Acadians from Ile St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby -
Fall-Winter 1999 Edition of THE ISLAND MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )



BRITON
Class, Tonnage and Captain unknown

The "Briton", was sent to Ile St. Jean set out from Louisbourg on 14
September and arrived at Ile ST. Jean on the 3 October. (Deportation of the
Acadians from Ile St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby - Fall-Winter 1999 Edition
of THE ISLAND MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )


CATHERINE
Class, Tonnage and Captain unknown

The transport "Catherine" set out on 10 August 1758 arriving on the 17 August
and left for Louisbourg on the 31 August 1758 and arrived on the 4 September
(Deportation of the Acadians from Ile St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby -
Fall-Winter 1999 Edition of THE ISLAND MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )

_______________________________________________________________________-

DUNBAR
Class, Tonnage and Captain unknown

The ransport "Dunbar" set out on 10 August 1758 arriving on the 17 August and
left for Louisbourg on the 31 August 1758 and arrived on the 4 September
(Deportation of the Acadians from Ile St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby -
Fall-Winter 1999 Edition of THE ISLAND MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )

___________________________________________________________________________


DUKE WILLIAM
Class, Tonnage and Captain unknown.
Ile Royale (Cape Breton), Ile St-Jean (Prince Edward Island)
and then to France.

The Duke William was among the transports used in November, 1758 to
transport the Acadians of Ile Royale (now Cape Breton), Ile St-Jean (Prince
Edward Island) to France. The Duke William was delayed with the other
vessels, shortly after their departure in the Gut of Canso until November 25,
1758 when they finally set sail for France.
After three days at sea a storm blew at night with rough and high seas
and sleet and rain. The storm lasted a couple of days. After a couple of
weeks, the Duke William, with 300 Exiles aboard, and the Violet, with 400
Acadian Exiles aboard, joined together, but the Violet was taking on water
and was in danger of sinking, and on about December 10th or,15th, (some say
December 13th), following a squall in the early morning, the Violet had sunk
to the bottom and all 400 Acadians board perished.
After working frantically for 4 days, trying to bale out the water, they
gave up and the captain and the crew of the Duke William abandoned the ship
in the lifeboats (twenty seven in one and nine in the other, including
captain Nicols) four Acadians threw over a small jolly boat and miraculously
reached England with the two life boats. It is believed that some 300 +
Acadians perished aboard the Duke William, while the captain and crew saved
themselves with the lifeboats.
However, it was reported that the DUKE WILLIAM, that had embarked with 346,
had disembarked, in St. Malo on November 1, 1758, and 147 had died during the
voyage. (The Duke William was also reported to have sunk with the Violet in a
storm on December 13, 1758. This is an error, or there may have been two
vessels named Duke Williams, used.)
The "Duke William", the largest, 400 tons, was sent to Ile St. Jean set out
from Louisbourg on 14 September and arrived at Ile ST. Jean on the 3 October.
Father Jacques Girourd of Pointe Prime and a fair number of his parishioners
where embarked on the "Duke William". A final count of the prisoners was
2,415, not including those sent earlier to Louisbourg. At least 600 were left
behind due to the lateness of the season and the need to get the transports
to France. Some of these 600 were too sick or diseased to be placed on the
ships but the majority of them were the residents of Malpeque on the West
Side of Malpeque Bay. (Malpeque is presently located on the East Side of
Malpqeue bay). - "Duke William" . Father Girard claimed one other transport
was wrecked, on the coast of Spain. But he may have confuses it with the
"Ruby". Also although the loss of life was heavy due to drowning, the loss of
life from disease and sickness was undoubtedly more. It is not exactly known
how many died on the "Duke William" It was estimated at 300 to 400 The
sinking of the "Duke William" on the 13 December with 34 British sailors,
Captain Nichols, Father Girard, surviving in the boats cutter and long boat.
They left behind the William's jolly boat, 4 male prisoners launched the
jolly boat before she sunk. They made it safely to Falmouth. (Deportation of
the Acadians from Ile St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby - Fall-Winter 1999
Edition of THE ISLAND MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )
The Duke William # Passengers 400 Death by Disease 100 Death by Drowing
296 Total Deaths 396 The captain survived from the "Duke William".
(Deportation of the Acadians from Ile St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby -
Fall-Winter 1999 Edition of THE ISLAND MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )




___________________________________________________________________________

HIND
Schooner, Tonnage and Captain unknown.
Ile St-Jean (Prince Edward Island) and then to ST MALO, France.

The schooner "Hind" set out on 10 August 1758 arriving on the 17 August.
The "Hind" left on 4 November with her flotilla; the "Hind", "Briton" and
"Richard and Mary" were headed to Louisbourg, the others for France.
(Deportation of the Acadians from Ile St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby -
Fall-Winter 1999 Edition of THE ISLAND MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )
The log of the of the Hind was used as a resource for Earle Lockerby's
article on the Acadian deportation of Ile St. Jean. (Deportation of the
Acadians from Ile St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby - Fall-Winter 1999 Edition
of THE ISLAND MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )


___________________________________________________________________________

JOHN SAMUELS
OR
JOHN AND SAMUELS
Class, Tonnage and Captain unknown.
Ile St-Jean (Prince Edward Island) and then to ST MALO, France.

The JOHN AND SAMUEL, was sent to Ile St. Jean set out from Louisbourg on
14 September and arrived at Ile ST. Jean on the 3 October. The "John and
Samuel", disembarked at St. Malo on 23 January 1758. The number of
passengers, or the # lost is unknown . (Deportation of the Acadians from Ile
St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby - Fall-Winter 1999 Edition of THE ISLAND
MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )




MARY
600 ton, Class, and Captain unknown.

The civilians, probably from the Hillsborough River area, were placed aboard
the 600 ton "Mary" (560 passengers, when she left Louisbourg on 27 September
1758), arrived at Portsmouth on 31 October 1758 with a large number of her
passengers suffering from "Malignant Distemper". The Captain reported he had
buried 250 to 260 passengers at sea, mostly children. The survivors were
taken to Cherbourg in the latter half of November. The Mary # Passengers 560
Death by Disease 25 Total Deaths 255 (45%). The five ships that reached St.
Malo had a average mortality rate of 33%,. (Deportation of the Acadians from
Ile St. Jean, 1758 By Earle Lockerby - Fall-Winter 1999 Edition of THE ISLAND
MAGAZINE, Earle Lockerby )
______________________________________________________

con't on Deportation ships part II


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