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Archiver > ADVANCED-RESEARCH > 2010-08 > 1281653816


From: "Ralph Taylor" <>
Subject: Re: [ADVANRES] Beginning of Surnames
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2010 16:56:56 -0600
References: <DC03DC1F589B4531B20E83848F93E97E@Ralphs><8250376C-9ACD-4E37-96DE-95F32767C01C@comcast.net><AANLkTin4Sn7dkcDLTquOFyKNLdXRN-B7z39tshtoP2oc@mail.gmail.com><82782092-4F0C-4F5C-B50E-E66FD538D76D@comcast.net><DE5DD093C844445A939CDCD11BC33CA4@WayneM2N68><AANLkTikJ6JU121XDsx6xHBkLx2DwqV_pDXacV3BcQPv5@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <AANLkTikJ6JU121XDsx6xHBkLx2DwqV_pDXacV3BcQPv5@mail.gmail.com>


I've been following the "Windsor" thread with interest. As a genetic
genealogist, I'd say these name changes were NPEs -- non-parental events.
<G>

As to Edward III, Wikipedia
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_III_of_England) says: "Edward was born
at Windsor on 13 November 1312, and was called Edward of Windsor in his
early years."

I wouldn't call that a true surname, but a "designation"; it distinguished
him from his father, also named Edward. His son, Edward IV, in fact, was
known as "Edward of Woodstock" for the place he was born. (That was during
his life, he later came to be known as "The Black Prince".)

I suppose that, if you're the most important person in a country, you don't
really need a surname and it could get in the way.

-rt_/)


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