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Archiver > AMERICAN-REVOLUTION > 2006-05 > 1148689729


From: "David Armstrong" <>
Subject: Re: [AMER-REV] Dunmore War
Date: Fri, 26 May 2006 20:28:49 -0400
References: <001601c6810b$da96ff30$1589ced8@yourcjyhi9abh9> <000501c68114$1a61e4b0$0a00a8c0@user0r3fd1e1ky>


George makes a great point except that my question is a little bit
different. It would seem that the same conditions existed in June of 1773
and in march of 1775 but it was in fact the summer of 1774 that the war got
kicked into gear. I am still left to wonder why then.

Best regards,

David Armstrong,
Elkins, WV
----- Original Message -----
From: "George Patrick" <>
To: <>
Sent: Friday, May 26, 2006 6:31 PM
Subject: Re: [AMER-REV] Dunmore War


> David, Questions related to your inquiry are basically the same question
> as to whether the Battle of Point Pleasant was the first military battle
> of the American Revolution or not. Some historians believe that the
> British were recruiting, so to speak, the various Indian tribes to attack
> settlers and settlements in the Western territories and drive them back
> across the mountains. The point being that the Western settlements were
> acting as a buffer to prevent the English military from attacking from the
> rear. In other words, if all of the resources of the Colonist were busy
> fending off attacks from the sea, it would not be too difficult to move a
> British force through Canada and, with the help of Indian tribes, deliver
> a fatal blow to the Colonial forces. Those who seem to favor this point
> of view would most likely believe that Dunmore was playing both sides
> against the middle and planned to be on the winning side no matter who
> won.
>
> It seems that other historians see it quite differently. They see very
> little evidence of British involvement and seem to think that the final
> Battle of Point Pleasant was simply the outcome of stupid attacks by
> rather uncivilized frontiersmen against Indian nations who wanted nothing
> more than peace and friendship. This mixed with stupid attacks by some
> out-of-control Indian youth against innocent frontier settlements led to
> the settlers finally saying enough is enough, and, thus, The Battle of
> Point Pleasant.
>
> I've read some about both positions and do agree that an argument could be
> made for either. But, being one whose ancestor fought in the Battle of
> Point Pleasant under Capt. John Murray and who was trying to build a life
> in what is currently Berkeley Co., W. VA., I must admit that I find the
> first argument to be most probable.
>
> Best Regards,
>
> George Patrick
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "David Armstrong" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Friday, May 26, 2006 4:32 PM
> Subject: [AMER-REV] Dunmore War
>
>
>> Hi Warren
>>
>> I haven't had time (yet) to look at the Force documents but maybe next
>> week after I return from captivity in Pennsylvania. Anyhow, in the mean
>> time I
>> have a question:
>>
>> I am way behind the rest of you on this and if I had the time to properly
>> read I would likely already know the answer, but the question is why did
>> the
>> Dunmore War break out when it did?
>>
>> Expansion into Indian land had been going on for 150 years. Killings of
>> Indians by whites and whites by Indians and Indians by Indians and whites
>> by
>> whites etc. were so commonplace that they often didn't even make news
>> (example Bultown). I cannot clearly see that Dunmore/Connolly and
>> Cornstalk
>> were any worse than others in their respective positions, and it would
>> seem
>> to me that the war would look to an observer in 1774 like a lose/lose
>> situation. So what actually lit the fuse in 1774? I know this is likely
>> an
>> idiotic question but I seem to be a bit muddled on some facts....
>>
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>> David Armstrong,
>> Elkins, WV
>>
>>
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