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Archiver > APG > 2007-09 > 1190143302


From: "Chad Milliner" <>
Subject: Re: [APG] Origin of Practice of Keeping Family Records in Bibles
Date: Tue, 18 Sep 2007 13:21:42 -0600
References: <003701c7f9ba$fe24b400$2101a8c0@YOUR58BA15CF1B><012101c7fa0e$dd71d720$4985124c@win2000a141573><00e801c7fa15$5e9dde10$1bd99a30$@com><9868DAB2CD3E5744877F626B73D92CEC052F5742@pr-ex1.corp.myfamilyinc.com>
In-Reply-To: <9868DAB2CD3E5744877F626B73D92CEC052F5742@pr-ex1.corp.myfamilyinc.com>


That should be America: History and Life. I am not sure where the
"Library" came from.

-----Original Message-----
From: [mailto:] On
Behalf Of Chad Milliner
Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 12:27 PM
To:
Subject: Re: [APG] Origin of Practice of Keeping Family Records in
Bibles

Allison brings up a very good point about relevant information in
nontraditional journals. Almost all scholarly journals are thoroughly
abstracted by one or more online citation databases. Unfortunately, the
genealogical and public libraries where many of us do most of our
research typically do not subscribe to citation databases such as
America: History and Library. I find that database in particular to
frequently be very useful. Any academic library should subscribe to it,
but typically people who are not affiliated with the institution
supporting the library have to physically come to the library before
they can access it. Academic libraries often also usually have much
more extensive map collections and government document collections than
public libraries, and they may have important microform sets.

Chad Milliner

-----Original Message-----
From: [mailto:] On
Behalf Of Allison Ryall
Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 11:00 AM
To:
Subject: Re: [APG] Origin of Practice of Keeping Family Records in
Bibles

Elizabeth Shown Mills wrote:
>I suspect we have a goodly number on this list, like Christine, who are
intellectually challenged by the kind of projects that would provide
theoretical and interpretive foundations for our field--if there were a
venue in which their work could be published.

I do believe there are more and more graduate level multi-disciplinary
programs within a variety of University's that are encouraging these
types of theoretical and interpretive foundations that are beneficial to
the genealogical community. However, most of these programs don't have
the word 'genealogy' in the title. One must look beyond the name to
find them. One such academic program, which I am personally involved in
is referred to as American and New England Studies. While I attend the
University of Southern Maine's Masters program in this field (see
http://www.usm.maine.edu/anes/about/) there are other University that
offer both a Masters degree and a Ph.D. in this multi-disciplinary field
such as Boston University (see http://www.bu.edu/amnesp/). These types
of interpretive studies are exactly what is encouraged at my University
and are often sought out in multi-disciplinary degree programs.

Elizabeth also wrote:
>Our field does now have a significant number of Kathleens and
>Christines
and Karens and Carolyns and Daves (and Elizabeths--at least two of us :)
who
*have* been trained to do quantitative research. But, as Kathleen says,
our teachings focus primarily on case studies. Some of us have published
genealogy-driven quantitative studies in journals and academic presses
within other fields, but few of our genealogical colleagues are aware of
them.

The key at least in the short term is encouraging genealogists to look
beyond their traditional informational sources in order to find the
answers they seek. Often these multi-disciplinary studies are published
in scholarly journals (that aren't always available on the main stacks
at the local public library) or as Master's and Ph.D. theses. How many
genealogists use or even think of consulting a recently published theses
database as a source for interpretative information? I'm guessing
probably not many despite that they may be presently surprised at the
answers or information that they may find.

The other key issue to this statement that Elizabeth raises is phrase
"who
*have* been trained to do quantitative research". Training is the key
element to this phrase. It takes much training and education in order
to be able to do quantitative research that provides theoretical and
interpretive foundations. This ability and knowledge to conduct
interpretative analysis goes far beyond the interests or abilities of
most 'hobbyist' genealogists.
It requires specific understanding, education, and training.

Allison L. Ryall







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