APG-L Archives

Archiver > APG > 2008-02 > 1204208438


From: "Honey Ryan" <>
Subject: Re: [APG] Dialects, Language, Regionalism
Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2008 09:20:38 -0500
References: <669581.54715.qm@web84101.mail.mud.yahoo.com><C3250961-CEBB-4903-806B-21234D80F821@theinsightworks.net> <EA9BCD6C-1982-44C2-9FC9-C295813045CC@comcast.net><00b701c879cf$84c281b0$0201a8c0@YOUR58BA15CF1B>
In-Reply-To: <00b701c879cf$84c281b0$0201a8c0@YOUR58BA15CF1B>


I say "soft drinks." I grew up saying "Coke" of "Co-cola" for everything,
but that involved too much explanation if I wanted something other than
Coca-Cola. I just couldn't bring myself to say "pop" or "soda." Those
expressions were too Yankee (no offense.) So, I settled on "soft drink."


Honey Ryan

-----Original Message-----
From: [mailto:] On Behalf
Of Richard A. Pence
Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 1:03 AM
To: Claire Keenan Agthe; philip thorne
Cc: List
Subject: Re: [APG] Dialects, Language, Regionalism

"Claire Keenan Agthe" <> wrote:
> On Feb 26, 2008, at 2:54 PM, philip thorne wrote:
>
>> ...where in the
>> U.S. do people say soft-drinks?
>
> As far as I know, that's a marketing / menu term. The sellers of
> coke/soda/pop use it as a generic term (to avoid the whole soda/pop/
> whatever debate, no doubt), but I don't think anyone uses it in
> everyday speech. But maybe I'll be proven wrong...

Soft drinks = nonalcoholic drinks.

I've hard it in "everyday speech."

E.g.:

"How about a beer?"

"Do you have any soft drinks?"

Richard






.

-------------------------------
To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to
with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in
the subject and the body of the message


This thread: