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From: "LBoswell" <>
Subject: Re: [APG] Genealogy Education and the Profession - the starsarealigned
Date: Mon, 11 May 2009 12:11:15 -0400
References: <4A082BAA.9040705@ancestralmanor.com><005701c9d252$245262a0$6cf727e0$@net>
In-Reply-To: <005701c9d252$245262a0$6cf727e0$@net>


Or stop worrying about the "pack" snapping at our heels, and concentrate
instead on raising everyone's work to so-called 'professional' standards
(actually such standards simply represent good research methodology, and the
use of the adjective 'professional' is misleading suggests something beyond
the reach of non-professionals). The more 'lay' people understand the need
to use good research methodology, the more they'll appreciate what
professional genealogists offer.

Larry


----- Original Message -----
From: <>
To: <>; <>
Sent: Monday, May 11, 2009 12:04 PM
Subject: Re: [APG] Genealogy Education and the Profession - the stars
arealigned


> Sharon, your last paragraph should have been your first one, so no busy
> soul
> could miss it. I.e.,
>
>>Existing and aspiring professionals must now recognize that the good news
> and bad news is that the public will become more educated, placing demands
> on us to stay ahead of the pack. That is the challenge that we really need
> to consider in any professional vision.
>
> Elizabeth
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------
> Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
> APG member, Tennessee
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [mailto:] On Behalf
> Of Sharon
> Sent: Monday, May 11, 2009 8:44 AM
> To:
> Subject: [APG] Genealogy Education and the Profession - the stars are
> aligned
>
> Hello,
>
> Many distinctive base lines and trends have formed in genealogy.
>
> The online genealogy boom of the 1990s has broadened and solidified.
>
> Internet genealogy really did fuel the internet boom. Internet genealogy
> sites were vying for number one in the internet stats of the late 1990s
> and early 2000s - including Ancestry.com, Rootsweb.com,
> FamilySearch.com. All survived, though Rootsweb.com (as well as
> Genealogy.com) are now folded in with Ancestry in
> TheGenerationsNetwork.com.
>
> Genealogists were "early adopters" in this first internet wave. When
> FamilySearch.com launched in 1999, it was literally bowled over with
> traffic.
> http://www.ancestry.com/columns/myra/Shaking_Family_Tree06-17-99.htm
>
> As were many other genealogy records sites around the world when they
> first launched.
>
> In 2001 Ancestry's subscription base was only surpassed by the Wall
> Street Journal and Consumer Reports - leading the way out of the
> internet bust that followed the "free" internet boom speculation based
> on a banner advertising model.
> http://www.ancestry.com/learn/library/article.aspx?article=5336
>
> In 2002 it was reported that "Americans Spent $675 Mil. For Web Content.
> ... The top three categories were business content, entertainment, and
> personals/dating -- which accounted for 59% of all spending. ... The top
> domains by consumer content revenue were real.com, wsj.com, match.com,
> yahoo.com, consumerreports.org, ancestry.com, weightwatchers.com,
> 1800ussearch.com, matchmaker.com, and consumerinfo.com."
> http://www.allbusiness.com/services/business-services-miscellaneous-business
> /4693398-1.html
>
>
> However in that 2002 report, "The study reports that 9.2% of the total
> Net population in the U.S. has paid for content online." Thus the
> internet that was once dominated by genealogy traffic had already
> broadened exponentially as it reached around the world. The internet
> continued to broaden its application, but the size of the public
> population that accesses genealogical records also continues to grow at
> a steady rate.
>
> Just because marketing pundits do not recognize genealogical research as
> a market sector, doesn't mean it isn't there. Social networks,
> government and commercial services [in addition to Ancestry's own
> growth] have increased the range of demographics for the genealogy
> researcher market.
>
> Just because the growth is not a large enough rate for Ancestry.com in
> particular to enable venture capitalists [who began their investment in
> Ancestry more than 10 years ago to the tune of some 90 million dollars
> in the 1990s alone] to take Ancestry public yet - the total online
> genealogy market base continues to be nothing to sneeze at.
>
> There is a reason why the caveat "past performance is not a predictor of
> future returns" is so often found in the fine print following an
> historical summary of sales and marketing numbers.
>
> The world changes all the time. There are market booms and busts. Cycles
> of growth and stabilization. Problems and opportunities. Undetected
> patterns.
>
> However, the market for genealogy education is now a leading indicator
> for the genealogy market for genealogy professionals.
>
> After more than a decade of online records access proliferation, there
> is a resultant realization that online genealogy records volume does not
> guarantee results. The bottom line is that millions of people are
> struggling to figure out what to do with all the information they have
> access to, and wondering what they are missing.
>
> The demand for more options for genealogical education has resulted in
> new programs. The patterns seen in early adopters of the education
> solution are important. As this educated public market trend grows, the
> educated public will increase the awareness and demand for professional
> researchers.
>
> Despite the fact that the new Boston University university certificate
> program is a professional development category - most of the registrants
> were there to improve their skills for personal reasons, perhaps
> incidentally leading to a professional path. Only a few lawyers,
> librarians and other disciplines were motivated by professional needs
> first.
>
> Trying to segregate and categorize the profession as it exists today is
> an exercise that ignores the underlying market momentum. The internet
> population began with online records access - long well in excess of the
> perhaps 600,000 people who belong to genealogical societies.
>
> Existing and aspiring professionals must now recognize that the good
> news and bad news is that the public will become more educated, placing
> demands on us to stay ahead of the pack. That is the challenge that we
> really need to consider in any professional vision.
>
> Sharon Sergeant
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> .
>
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