AUS-VIC-HIGH-COUNTRY-L Archives

Archiver > AUS-VIC-HIGH-COUNTRY > 2003-01 > 1042973067


From: "Frank O'Rourke" <>
Subject: Re: [HC] Jingellic Station
Date: Sun, 19 Jan 2003 21:44:27 +1100
References: <347936C8-2B96-11D7-9B3D-00039342BB54@dodo.com.au>


Chris

Try this site for some info
http://www.benet.net.au/~brandis/readers/john001.html

Jingellic is in the Tumbarumba Shire - suggest you contact the General
Manager at the Shire offices at Tumbarumba

TUMBARUMBA SHIRE COUNCIL
Corner Bridge and Winton Streets
Tumbarumba
Tel - 02 6948 9100
Fax - 02 6948 2865
Email -
Web - www.tumbashire.nsw.gov.au


Jingellic Station Cemetery records are held for1902 - 1929 - the Gympie
Qld Family History Society Inc has a copy - see
http://www.gympiefhs.egympie.com.au/Gympie%20Society/cemeteries.htm

Some Jingellic history follows:
Historical well grassed riverside plains on both sides of the Murray around
Jingellic first ran cattle in the 1830s, followed by land grants in the
1840s and 1850s. Four large stations dominated Jingellic. At first the main
river crossing was downstream at Howlong and the coach service from Wodonga
in Victoria came to Jingellic via Albury. The Border Inn on Maracket station
from the mid 1850s was primarily a stopover from Albury rather than a major
river-crossing hotel. The contrast between the roads on the opposing banks
of the Murray, however, encouraged use of the ford at the mouth of Horse
Creek nearby: in 1872 'the one side, Victoria, has a first class road, and
the other, New South Wales, a dangerous cattle track'. This encouraged the
building of a bridge at Jingellic, begun in 1887 but not opened until 1892.

A customs house was immediately built on the Victorian side and until after
Federation smuggling flourished as locals used the Horse Creek ford instead.
Customs dues were no longer an issue after 1915 and the growth of a major
butter factory in Jingellic after 1920 encouraged both town growth and
increased use of the bridge. Although the dairy industry was in decline in
the 1950s (and the butter factory closed in 1963), the motor traffic on the
bridge made it unsafe and in 1959 the present bridge was constructed
downstream from the early bridge (of which the pylons survive). The resiting
of the bridge meant the realignment of the access road in New South Wales,
which from 1959 onwards has bypassed Jingellic township, passing through
Jingellic cattle-station instead.

Regards
Frank


----- Original Message -----
From: Chris Wild <>
To: <>
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2003 9:10 PM
Subject: [HC] Jingellic Station


> Hi All
>
> Does anyone have any info on Jingellic Station, cira 1850-1860.
> The owner was Alexander Elmslie, looking for a possible worker by the
> name of Edward Phillips & a Susan Shermer?
> She went there in March of 1857.
>
> Thanks in advance.
> Chris
>
>



This thread: