BANAT-L Archives

Archiver > BANAT > 2005-08 > 1122925906


From: "Gabriele Rudinger" <>
Subject: RE: [BANAT-L] AKdFF membership
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2005 21:51:46 +0200
In-Reply-To: <20050801190924.50631.qmail@web50805.mail.yahoo.com>


Hello Tom,

I grew up in Vöcklabruck, a small town in Upper Austria which is roughly
between Munich and Vienna. Both cities are about 250 kilometers away from
Vöcklabruck. For the past 15 years I have been living in Vienna, about to
move to the suburbs (finally...).

Thank you for the nice welcome!
Gabi.


> -----Original Message-----
> From: tom farley [mailto:]
> Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 9:09 PM
> To: Gabriele Rudinger
> Subject: RE: [BANAT-L] AKdFF membership
>
>
> Hey Gabi, wonderful to read your entry. Can you give
> us a general idea as to where you in Austria - miles
> from other towns etc. just curious. Thanks, and I
> should have some other questions later on. Tom
>
> --- Gabriele Rudinger <>
> wrote:
>
> > Hello list members,
> >
> > I am relatively new to your wonderful list, and this
> > topic is just so
> > fascinating that I want to contribute for the first
> > time.
> >
> > I live in Europe, more exactly in Austria, which has
> > a large number of
> > Donauschwaben. My ancestors used to live in the
> > village of Erdewik in
> > Syrmia. They had to leave their homes in 1944, at
> > that time my father was 5
> > years old.
> >
> > Even though I was born almost 30 years later, I did
> > grow up in an enormously
> > Donauschwabian environment. Many Germans from
> > Erdewik remained close to the
> > place where they first went.
> >
> > My childhood is therefore full of the Donauschwaben
> > tradition. We had a
> > "Sommerkich" (Sommerküche, or "summer kitchen") out
> > in the yard; the cooking
> > was mainly Donauschwabian; old women in long, black
> > skirts wearing a scarf
> > (with the ends sticking out in a perfect horizontal)
> > were absolutely normal;
> > I grew up "bilingual": Austrian and Donauschwaben
> > dialect, often having to
> > translate for my friends who didn't understand what
> > my grandmother said; the
> > annual Erdewiker Treffen (meetings) where us kids
> > were dressed up and
> > enjoyed the then Schilling and German Mark because
> > we were so sweet; and
> > there are many other things like that.
> >
> > When I was about 15 I first got interested in
> > genealogy and quizzed my
> > grandmother endlessly; fortunately, she loved
> > talking about "dahoom"
> > (daheim, at home), as she still said after 60 years.
> > She died at the age of
> > 96, and we spent a lot of time with me asking
> > questions about how life was.
> > So I think that I have a picture of their life,
> > maybe more than that of my
> > other grandparents who had always lived in Austria.
> >
> > My father's generation, the 60+, sometimes still use
> > their original dialect
> > when they are speaking with each other, but for my
> > generation,
> > Donauschwabian heritage has a very very low profile.
> > We don't speak the
> > dialect, and after 60 years in Austria, we fully
> > identify with this country.
> > But I do notice that more and more people my age who
> > are of Donauschwaben
> > descent start getting interesting in doing some
> > research.
> >
> > As I said in the beginning, I am still at the start,
> > trying to find out if
> > any records exist for Erdewik, whether my ancestors
> > lived in other villages
> > too, etc. Beginner's tasks.
> >
> > Being a German native speaker, I'd love to help out
> > if somebody needs some
> > translation done. It may take some time as these
> > days it's very busy, but I
> > think that language should never be a barrier.
> >
> > Hope that I didn't ramble too much...
> >
> > Gabi.
> >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: Frank Dornstauder
> > [mailto:]
> > > Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 6:56 PM
> > > To:
> > > Subject: Re: [BANAT-L] AKdFF membership
> > >
> > >
> > > Hi Deborah,
> > >
> > > The discussion on our Banat ancestors is very
> > interesting. My
> > > family came to
> > > Canada in 1897. My father was 10 years old. They
> > eventually
> > > homesteaded and
> > > began to build their lives in Canada.
> > >
> > > From a homesteaders point of view they didn't have
> > much time to dwell on
> > > their past. It was a hard living and all energy
> > went into survival and
> > > building for the future. They continued with their
> > language but encouraged
> > > the next generation to learn English and adapt to
> > North American
> > > ways. I can
> > > understand this mentality because in their
> > previous experience in
> > > the Banat
> > > they were usually in a minority, (except in their
> > villages) and subject to
> > > variety of ethnic and political tensions and
> > biased treatment. They were
> > > often regarded as interlopers and treated as such.
> > So, it would be natural
> > > for them to assume a low profile in their newly
> > adopted land. As the old
> > > saying goes, "keep your eyes open and your tail
> > down"! Why
> > > attract attention
> > > to your presence and "differentness"?
> > >
> > > My parents and relatives did speak a little of the
> > Banat when they got
> > > together for their Sunday dinners but this was not
> > upper- most in their
> > > minds. They spoke German, and the younger school
> > age children spoke mainly
> > > English. It was not unusual when speaking to our
> > elders that the
> > > conversation was in two languages, the elders
> > speaking German the children
> > > speaking English. This did not seem unusual for us
> > because in the later
> > > years the elders understood English and the
> > children understood German.
> > >
> > > My family and other relatives had contact with
> > some of their
> > > cousins in the
> > > Banat immediately after WW11. They were living in
> > the prison camp in
> > > Rudolfsgnad and some correspondence occurred at
> > that time. I can
> > > remember my
> > > family making "relief packages" for them and
> > sending basic food such as
> > > flour, rice and clothing. This was in 1947/47. We
> > lost track of them after
> > > that. I'm not sure why.
> > >
> > > Back to the first point, I think that our North
> > American Banaters just
> > > wanted to left alone to pursue a decent living and
> > to be able to
> > > live their
> > > lives in peace and harmony with the broader
> > community. The best way to do
> > > this was to "blend in". Of course, one of the
> > consequences is
> > > that the next
> > > generation looses the language, and the loss of
> > language is very quickly
> > > followed by the loss of tradition and culture.
> > >
> > > This is only my perspective. I can only speak from
> > my family's experience.
> > > I'm sure others will have different points of
> > view.
> > >
> > > Frank D.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message -----
> > > From: "Richard & Deborah Owens"
> > <>
> > > To: <>
> > > Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 9:23 AM
> > > Subject: Re: [BANAT-L] AKdFF membership
> > >
> > >
> > > > Dear Scott and Dave,
> > > > I have enjoyed this discussion very much. My
> > son is studying German and
> > > I'm
> > > > going to start my daughter in it too (we
> > homeschool) so I was
> > > wondering if
> > > > you, Dave, can give us the address for signing
> > up to the German
> > > Banat List
> > > .
> > > > Dave, you mentioned that the North American
> > Listers are more chatty than
> > > our
> > > > German cousins. Do the folks there avoid it
> > because it is
> > > annoying or is
> >
> === message truncated ===
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________
> Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
> http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
>
>
>


This thread: