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Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 22 dtd 31 Oct 1997 (edited)
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 1999 12:42:03 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 22
(issued as required by )
October 31, 1997
(all rights reserved)

HALLOWEEN-ABEND Vor ALLERHEILIGEN
(A special time to remember our ancestors.)

This edition of the newsletter contains articles on Villages (continuation of
a series; look for your family names, they'll probably be the earliest dates
you'll ever find), a Member's Success Story, and Wedding of an Hapsburg Heir.

BURGENLAND VILLAGE DATA FROM THE PATER GRATIAN ANTON LESER, O. F. M.
(1873-1949) VILLAGE EXCERPTS (continued)
The Burgenland Bunch newsletters have included much data concerning
individual Burgenland villages. If you're a recent BB member and haven't seen
them all, you may wish to download BB News Nos. 10, 11 and 12. They deal
mainly with current demographics, local bu"rgermeisters, early immigrants,
Hungarian village names, churches attended and LDS microfilm available for
villages being researched by BB members. In addition, the Austro-Hungarian
Gazetteer cross reference lists (prepared by Albert Schuch; 4 lengthy
lists-order from GJB) are also available; these show German village names for
the entire Burgenland, Hungarian equivalent names, governmental districts and
location of church and civil records.The Father Gratian Leser village series,
of which numbers two to six are excerpted here, deal with earliest village
history extant and mention numerous family names. They started in BB No.-21
and we plan to issue them for all available BB members' villages.

2) GROSSMU"RBISCH (G-M)
Josef DERKITS, house nr. 32, discovered some prehistoric tools a few years
ago. Inhabitants: 1745 - 244; 1779 - 277; 1812 - 405; 1832 - 489. In 1698 G-M
belonged to the church of St. Nikolaus. In 1779 a man named Franz SCHWARZ
rang the bells for G-M, he may have been a teacher too. The first known
cemetery was situated in the garden of todays house nr.1; there, bricklayer
Johann GRO"LLER (house nr. 117) built a chapel in 1913. In 1822 Paul
BUTZOLICH was teacher in G-M. From 1844 to 1884 Simon GLUDOVATZ was teacher,
1885-89 Anton PLOHOVICS, 1889-1923 Anton GALOS, who was assisted by the
teachers (from 1906 onwards): Josef MESCHNARK, Johann KIRSCHNER, Johann KYRI,
Rudolf DVOZSAK, Stefan SCHMAL, Theresia FISCHER; 1923 Karl VUKOVITS was
teacher, in the same year he was succeeded by Anton SZUCSICH from Hornstein.

In 1899 the old church was torn down (was too small). "Church father" (head
of the parish council) was Johann GRLLER (Nr. 117). Franz KLUCSARITS (Nr.
81) organised a fund raising among American emigrants. (translated excerpt
from the series "Das Gu"ssinger Land" by Josef Karl HOMMA in "Volk und
Heimat" 14-15/1956, which is a shortened version of Father Gratian LESER's
articles in the "Gu"ssinger Zeitung" 41-43/1928)

3) KLEINMU"RBISCH
In 1643 K.-inhabitants Martin GERDONICH, Michael GOMBKO"TKO", Mathe and
Jurida SZULAROVICH had to come to Gu"ssing (due to a law suit), in 1658
Michael DRAXLER and Michael KANACZ. The nobleman Franz KALDY of Fels Kaldy
was a captain in the troops of Count Batthyany 1648-1669, who pledged to him
the village of Deutsch Tschantschendorf plus two vineyards in K. -
neighbouring vineyards belonged to Gregor ANYOS, Michael KOVACS and Philipp
EKKER. In 1733 the last of the heirs of one Martin GOGER died, thus a
vineyard owned by him was returned to Count Batthyany, who gave it to Michael
KIRLHAUSER of Gu"ssing.

The Catholics of KM always belonged to the St. Nikolaus parish. The first
church bell was bought in 1776, the man who rang it was Michael SZABAN, 33
years old and married. Since there was no church in KM at that time, people
went to the Franziskaner church in Gu"ssing. The dead were buried in the
cemetery of St. Nikolaus until 1822, when KM got a cemetery of its own. Until
1824 the children of KM went to school in St. Nikolaus. From 1824-44 Johann
CSAAR from Rotenturm was teacher in KM, he bought house nr. 45, and died on
12 Sep 1844 aged 56. His successors were the teachers Viktor SEMLER (1844-
52; who was also Richter 1861-65), Aloysius CSAAR (1852-56, son of Johann;
Aloysius died 14 Jul 1856 aged 25), Michael NEUBAUER (1856-58), Ignatius
DERCHSALER (1858-69, from Gross-Kainich in Styria, died 24 Mar 1870 aged 69),
Johann STIPITS (1869-70), Franz FISCHL (1870-72), Franz MU"HL (1873-83),
Franz STEINHO"FLER (1883-85), Paulus LOIKITS (1886-88, died 31 Mar 1888 aged
70), Aloys SALEK, Andreas LOIKITS (1889-93), Johann PLOHOVITS (1894-97),
Franz KO"NIG (1897-98), Karolina KAMEN (1899-1905), Paul JAGENBREIN (1905-
06), Franz ZORN (1906-08), KLANACSKY (a few months), Sarolta WAGNER (1901-
11), Alexander HOFFMANN (1911-12), Elvira SAILER (1913-22), Hermann ECKER
(1922-?; from Inzenhof). (translated excerpt from the series "Das Gu"ssinger
Land" by Josef Karl HOMMA in "Volk und Heimat" 15-16/1956, which is a
shortened version of Father Gratian LESER's articles in the "Gu"ssinger
Zeitung")

4) KROTTENDORF
Part of the St. Nikolaus parish (near Gu"ssing); the people of K. were buried
in the St.Nikolaus cemetery until 1840, when they founded their own cemetery
in K. In 1842 Michael SZAMEL was Richter, Franz MORTH and Michael GAMMER were
"Geschworene" (jurors). The children of K. went to school in St. Nikolaus
until 1923; after that they went to Gu"ssing. (from "Volk und Heimat" 16/1956)

5) HASENDORF
Also part of the St. Nikolaus parish; the cemetery of H. is first mentioned
in 1812; the children went to school in St. Nikolaus until 1874, then to
Punitz (teacher Johann PERNITZ), from 1875 onwards to Tobaj (teacher Karl
EIGEL). (from "Volk und Heimat" 16-17/1956)

6) PUNITZ
Many houses have been built recently (that would be in the 1920's!) with
"American" money. A document of 1553 says: "Punitz has been built during the
last 2 years by refugee-farmers (from Croatia)"; in 1588 26 houses were
deserted, the inhabitants had died from the plague, in 1595, 35 houses were
deserted. Punitz also suffered during the Bocskay rebellion. In 1662 Punitz
was divided between (the brothers) Counts Christoph and Paul Batthyany. The
inhabitants belonging to Count Christoph were: Mathe STERKOVICH, Lorenz
KARLOVICH, Peter KRULARICH, Mathe PETRASSICS, Matecz MOAR, Ive PISZLICSOVICS,
Peter STARICS, Andreas SITAK, Bertal SCHINDELMACHER, Stipan KRUHARICH, Mikula
HARASZTICS, Peter SZUSTER,
Gregor HORVATH, Ive VOYKOVICS, Mathe VELISZOVICH, Marko DRAGOVICH, Juray
MAGDICH, Michael JUGONECS and Blasius STRANSA. A document of 1677 gives the
names of the following inhabitants: Thome IVANKOVICH, Mathes DRAGEVICH,
Gregor ANYOS, Jure SZOKACHICH, Jure KOVACHICH, Mathes JUGOVICH, Miko
JUGOVICH, Ive MAGDICH, Ive MAKOVICH, Jure SZOKACHICH, Petar SIMONCHICH,
Mattlen JUGOVICH, Janos VARGA, Thomas SALFEY, Mihal SZOKACHICH, Jure SITAK,
Mathe HANICHICH, Jure VARGA.

The Visitationen (type of church inventory) mention the names of people
working the possessions (mostly vineyards) owned by the church: 1698:
Matthias DRAGOSITS, Johann HUSITS; 1757: Josef STANER; 1779: Martin RABVET,
1812 and 1832: Johann SAMMER. In 1871 the church owned land was sold to Ignaz
HEILIMAN of Glasing. He was not able to pay the price, so parts were
subsequently sold to Johann KERTELITS (1879) and Josef MARAKOVITS (1902).

The "Pfarrhaus" (parish house) was used as an inn in the 19th century. The
last inn keeper was Josef SAUERZOPF, the building was torn down in 1886.

Teachers: In 1779 Josef KERSCHBAUM; later on Georg DRAGAN (died 1806 aged
65), Karl KANZ (1812-38; from Forchtenau, aged 24 years in 1812), Johann
PIUFSITS, Georg KALOSITS (1842-46), Stefan KIRCHKNOPF (1857-61), Ignaz KOKOLY
(1868-73), Josef BERGER (1873-74), Stefan KAPPEL (1874-95), Ferdinand BERGER
(1895-1913), Maria LASCHOBER (second teacher, 1912), Karl and (wife) Helene
LANTOS (1913-19), Adolf HALWACHS and (wife) Emilie BERGER (1920-?).
A (wooden) church was first mentioned in 1677 (Heiligen Sebastian and
Fabian). In 1698 two church bells are mentioned (ed. note: church bells were
expensive and their acquisition was always a major event. Many were melted
down for cannon or scrap in the war years and immigrants often donated money
for their replacement) , also a cemetery. 1739-41 a new (solid, that is built
with stones) church was built (Hl. Sebastian). 1859 the church burned down
(lightning!), a new one was built soon. In 1921 the church was renovated,
with money donated by 3 American emigrants: Stefan JELENSITS, Johann
SZOKASICH and Anton MESSENLEHNER. A war memorial was also built with their
money in 1925. Other "American" donors of the 1920ies were Hermine
ASCHENELLER, Anna MARAKOVITS, Anna JELENSITS and Anna MAGDITS. (from "Volk
und Heimat" 17-18/1956)

A BEGINNER TRIES THE LDS MICROFILM FOR THE FIRST TIME
One of the pleasures I get from this business is watching someone grow in
genealogical expertise. The following is from Gerri Hartmann who a few months
ago had still not found the Burgenland village of her ancestors. She was also
new to genealogy. We found her village (Gross Petersdorf) and identified the
appropriate church microfilm records. She recently sent this email:

<< Gerry, Had a good day yesterday on my research. I ordered the two films
you suggested and they finally arrived. Found my great grandparents marriage
records, and my grandparents baptismal records. I cannot wait to dig in some
more to get the birth dates of great grandparents. By the info on the
marriage records I now have their ages, which will give me an approximate
birth year. Well you know what that does, it just keeps on taking you back
and this is really exciting. I do have some questions, however. How do I
find out their year of deaths? How do I find out the siblings of
grandparents. Does the house number help me to find this out? Example: If I
look through all the records showing this house number will that give me the
names, etc. Did they have census there and then that I could look up?

I really can't wait to get to the next step. Secondly, would you please add
the following surnames to my list. FANK, UNGER, NOMA, STAURER (not sure of
the spelling), GRAF. I can see you laughing every time some beginner like me
gets going. Have a good day and look forward to your response. Geri >> My
answer:

Great news, you're well on your way. Death dates require looking at all the
deaths for your names and or house numbers. Sometimes there will be an
alphabetic name index at the back of the film. Sometimes you might find a
reference note concerning birth date on the death list. Not often but I
always look for them. Pay attention to terms like "widow of XXXX" which will
give you spouse death clues. (If she was a widow, by definition you know her
husband died before she did). You'll also see references in baptism and
marriage records to "the late so and so". If you find the death of one of
your people and it says "wife of the late YYYY or widower of WWW you know
they died at a previous date. For siblings you must check out all births for
your names looking for the same parents, also house numbers help. Start from
year of marriage if you know it. There is a census from 1828, but not like
ours, it does not list children or spouse. You must use the church records.
Later you should also look at the 1896-1921 Civil records if they fall in
your time frame. You say nothing about other villages. I'm sure you'll find
that some of your people came from other villages and maybe used other
churches, be sure to stay alert for any references. You'll want to look at
their records later. I assume you're copying all the data, if not, you
should. Also photo copy your main line findings. They are as good as an
official document.

HAPSBURG HEIR MARRIES AN OLDENBURG
If you've ever wondered what happened to the Hapsburg line you'll be happy(?)
to know that it's alive and well. Bob Unger sent me this newspaper excerpt.
If any of you tell us you're connected to either of these two, you better be
ready to prove it with a pedigree chart!

<< The San Diego Union-Tribune (10/19/97) reported that the Austrian royalty
still lives on.
"Hungarian (Austrian), German royal figures wed. Budapest, Hungary - A
grandson of Austria's last emperor wed a German duchess yesterday in a
ceremony attended by leading members of the world's nobility. More than 500
guests of noble lineage turned out at St. Stephen's Basilica to see
32-year-old Georg von Hapsburg - Archduke of Austria and Grandson of Emperor
Charles I - wed Duchess Eilika Helene Jutta Clementine von Oldenburg, 25, in
a ceremony carried live on Hungarian television. About 2,000 Hungarians and
tourists gathered outside the 19th-century church for a glimpse of the
couple." >>

Albert Schuch tells me Georg Hapsburg is only second in line to the
non-existent throne. The 'heir' is Karl who lives in Salzburg, he is a member
of the European (Union) parliament for the Austrian Conservative party. Georg
lives in Budapest, he is co-owner of a tv-station.

Maybe the Austrians are missing a good thing. If they would reinstate the
monarchy (an English version), perhaps they too could get constant media
coverage! During the time of the monarchy, I understand that sixteen quarters
of aristocracy were required to marry into the royal family. This meant that
your parents through your 3-g-grandparents (62 people) had to be patented
nobility. This provided lots of work for the genealogists (Heralds) of the
period. I'm sure they were told to "find" the necessary documents. My limited
heraldic library tells me that the Oldenburgs go back at least to the 15th
Century but it doesn't show their pedigree. At the Basilica of Frauenkirchen
in the Seewinkel of Burgenland there is a beautiful mural of the pedigree of
Carl Heinrich, Graf von Bardeau, born 18 July 1876. It shows the coats of
arms of his ancestors-all 62 of them! While enjoying the fruits of democracy
we still remain fascinated by the aristocracy.

END OF NEWSLETTER-EDITED & DISTRIBUTED BY GERALD J. BERGHOLD, For information
concerning the Burgenland Bunch, contact .

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