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Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 37 dtd 15 Jun 1998 (edited)
Date: Sun, 4 Jul 1999 07:22:01 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 37
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND GENEALOGY
(issued biweekly by )
June 15, 1998
(all rights reserved)

CHANGE IN NEWSLETTER FORMAT!
With over 150 members, we're getting a lot of newsletter material. This
pleases me no end but the back log of material with a short shelf life is
causing some problems. I'm not able to publish it in a timely fashion and
still bring you featured articles and membership information, email being
limited to about 30K. I also rely on Clipboard copying and Clipboard is
limited as to size. Email of 30K is frequently downloaded by some servers as
an attached file and this can be cumbersome for some as well as hazardous. I
do not wish to use compressed files. Effective with this issue, I will start
issuing newsletters in two or three sections of 25K or less depending on the
amount of material on hand. Section one will carry feature articles. Section
two (A) will contain current correspondence and section three (B) will
contain membership data such as new members and member changes, homepage
statistics and changes to our internet address list. This issue includes
number 37, number 37A and number 37B. Similar to the sections in your local
newspaper!

This section contains articles on St. Michael im Burgenland, 1924 Immigrant
Donations for Szt. Kathrein, Maureen Tighe-Brown Conducting Research in
Budapest and Eisenstadt and Availability of Baptism & Conversion Records.

23) SANKT MICHAEL (H: Szent Mihly)
-continuation of the father Leser village series from Albert Schuch:

Called "Pusztaszentmihly" in Hungarian since 1544, to distinguish from
Gropetersdorf ("Nagyszentmihly"). Was predominantly Croatian from ca.1600
till at least 1812. Market place, belonging to the Counts Batthyny since
1524. Surnames as mentioned in the baptism records 1712-23: SAILER, HANZL,
RADAKOVITS, MAROSITS, BOISSITS, GARTLER, PAUER, JANDRISEVITS, KAVLERITS,
NOVOSZEL, FRHMANN, KOPITAR, EBERHARD, RUESZ, ZWITKOVITS, SCHAAR, SCHNEDL,
SALLER, MATHEI, STIPSITCS, KOVCS, KREUTZER, FABSICS, GERGISCH, HATZL,
SCHRANZ, GRIESZL, PRUNNER, DAMASCHITSCH, TOBISCH, WAGNER, MATISCHOVICH,
TROBITSCH, MALITS, FRANCZICZ, JOSICH, EBERL, MARX, LORENZ, KRAMMER, HOPITZA,
SAUERZOPF, PNY, BERKOVITS, STEINER, KRANZ, MAREKOVICH, VIRK, SIEDERICH,
PETKOVICH, MURLASICH.

The fragmentary Urbarium of 1768 shows as noble land owners apart from the
Batthyny: LIPICS, SZILGYI, Adam and Franz FRANCZICZ, Franz BARDISCHI and
Sigmund JOBBGYI. The FRANCZICZ family (Peter F. ennobled in 1573, his sons
were Franz, Stefan, Johann and Kaspar) also had possessions in Tatzmannsdorf
(Franz F., 1604), Tobaj (Franz and Sigmund F., 1693, mill owners) an Ond
(Stefan F., 1646). The baptism records of 1716 state that a Peter F. was a
General, the same surname also mentioned in the years 1721 (Stefan F.), 1749
(Martin and Franz), 1750 (Sigmund and Adam), 1762 (Franz), 1780 (Anton), 1790
(Theofil), 1799-1803 (Josef). Tax liability of the community: In 1776 St.
Michael was assessed 56 6/8 Dica (1 Dica 1 fl 48 Den.) amounting to 356 fl
86 Den. tax. In 1796: 257 5/8 Dica ( 1 fl 40 kr) amounting to 429 fl 22
kr. In 1800: 259 Dica ( 1 fl 36 kr) amounting to 414 fl 36 kr. "Dica", in
Hungarian "rovs", in our area called "Robisch" was the unit of taxation; the
amount of the Dica was decided by the Hungarian (noble) parliament; the word
Dica also means tax, hence the verb "dicare" = to pay tax(es).

In 1811 French soldiers confiscated the horse of Josef SZIDERICS. In 1848
Johann FIGERL, Ludwig EIXNER and Adam EBERHARD served in the National Guard.
Stefan and Josef SAILLER, Johann WOLF, Andreas JANDRISCHICH, Stefan SIDERITS,
Georg HANZEL and Franz KLEMENT were recruited for the army, each of them
receiving 50 fl plus some money for traveling expenses from the community.
Apart from that, one Johann SCHUCH gave "his" recruit 63 fl. [translator's
note: meaning that originally J.S. had been drafted, but had been wealthy
enough to pay this person to serve instead of himself. This system was still
practiced in WWI.]

The "Freiwillige Feuerwehr" (Voluntary Fire Brigade) was founded in 1903. In
1853 letters were still mailed in Gropetersdorf, in the 1860's Sankt Michael
already had its own postmaster, Rudolf GRABNER, who was succeeded by Franz
NEMETH (ca. 1879-1910). First "Kreisarzt" (physician) was Thomas BALLUF (ca.
1858-84), followed by Emmerich RETTEGI and Dr. Rudolf GRABNER (since 1921).
Until 1860 the teachers acted as notaries, from then on notaries were:
1860-81 Johann KONRATH, 1881-95 Hugo GRUBER, 1896-1921 Josef ILLS (shot by
Hungarian guerrillas). Number of inhabitants: 1812- 461; 1832- 1179; 1929-
928 (156 houses).

In 1698 the parish included villages Gamischdorf, Schallendorf, Rauchwart,
Neuberg and Gttenbach, the predominant language was Croatian. Lutheran
pastors: Matthias VISNYK (1618-19), Johann VUNICZA (1624), Johann STORK
(1669). The churches had been reclaimed for the Catholics by Count Adam
Batthyny in 1634, so the Lutheran service was held in a private house.
Number of Lutherans in 1698: 107 in St. Michael itself, 382 in the whole
parish. In 1757 the church was still surrounded by the cemetery, only two
Lutherans in the whole parish (1711 Catholics). Church records starting with
1712 (baptisms), 1713 (deaths) and 1714 (marriages). Today's church built in
1778. New cemetery outside the village since 1841. Oral tradition knows of
two other former cemeteries. In 1847 Neuberg and Gttenbach became
independent parishes.

On 4 June 1773, while the teacher, his 8 year old son and two villagers,
Nikolaus MURLASICS and Matthias BOISITS (both ca. 24 y) were ringing the
church bells during a thunderstorm, lightning struck, leaving the teacher and
his son unharmed but killing the two others. During the Canonical Visitation
of 1827 the village council states that the cross (with a wooden statue of
the Virgin Mary) located in the center of the village has already been
erected "by our forefathers in times unknown", and that they promise to keep
it in good shape. This document (19 June 1827) is signed by the council
members Georg SAILER (Richter), Josef DERGOSITS, Matthias BOISITS, Johann
SCHUCH and Johann SVETITS. In 1853 the community erected a chapel at this
place. Iron parts were bought from Bernharth STERN [translator's note:
probably a Jewish merchant], 5000 bricks and some wooden parts from Philipp
HANZL; also engaged in this effort were the carpenter Matthias SIMON and the
blacksmith Josef SCHUCH.

The "Ortskinder in Amerika" (children of the village living in America, 350
persons [in 1929]) were always benefactors of the community, they donated the
money for a statue of the Virgin Mary, a second church bell and the War
Memorial (consecrated 28 May 1922; casualties in WW I: St.Michael 29,
Rauchwart 29, Schallendorf 8, Gamischdorf 9).

Priests:Georg HERWOWICZ (1698), Franz Xaver HIRSCH (1712-17), Benedikt METELL
and Georg WEINLINGER (1717-19), Johann GRUDER (1719-26), Peter Johann
VONDERSICH (1726-49), Matthias VUKOVITS (1749-68), Franz PERKONIK (1768-73),
Johann MAGDITSCH (1773-87), Paul MICHTICS (1788-1820), Franz BARDOSSY
(1820-56), Franz AUSZERNEK (1860-88), Josef SZILGYI (1888-96), Franz THOMA
(1896-1923, was also "Landtagsabgeordneter" (member of the provincial
parliament) for some time), Georg HAUSCHKA (1923-25), Leopold Klement HOLZHEU
(1925-). In addition to these from 1808-1856 a total of 26 chaplains.

Teachers: Andreas GRIMMWALDT (1757), Franz RAFFEL (died 23 Dec 1800), Georg
RAFFEL (born in St. Michael, 34 y in 1812, succeeded his father Franz in
1800), Johann SVETITS (ca. 1817-1859; 44 y in 1832, has served in Stegersbach
before coming here), Franz SCHMAL (-1869), Franz WUKISEWITS (1868-83). New
school house built in 1864 at # 13. Further teachers: Josef SCHMAL
(1883-1909), Elemr KOLOSZR (1909-11), Julius SZENTGYRGYI (1911-23), Ludwig
BEIDL (1923-25), Josef HRCSKI (1925-), in 1929 Franziska TUNKL as second
teacher. Apart from this Catholic school a "Staatsschule" (run by the
government) was in existence from 1897. Teachers: Alexander SELESTEI
(1897-1921), Franz HANEL (1921-25), Josef TUNKL and Richard WIESINGER
(1925-). (source: V+H Nr. 14-16/1957)

IMMIGRANT DONATIONS FOR ST. KATHREIN ORGAN (Albert Schuch to Frank Teklits
and John Lavendoski-many villages and family names are mentioned.)

"I enjoyed reading your comments on the emigration article in the BB
newsletter. You may also have noticed the Loipersdorf list of donors. Here is
one from the Oberwarther Sonntags-Zeitung of 13 Apr 1924, showing American
donations for a new organ for the St. Kathrein church:"
Collectors were: Josef NOWOGORATZ in Nordhampton (sic!) and Johann
JELOSCHITSCH in St. Louis. Total sum of donations was 386 $ 40 Cents. Donors:
>From St. Kathrein: 5 $: Josef NOWOGORATZ, Johann JELOSCHITSCH, Stefan
TSCHENTSCHITSCH, Stefan SABARA, Hermann FRHWIRTH, Josef MILISCHITSCH, Stefan
MRAKOWITSCH, Franz MILISCHITSCH, Stefan STUBITSCH, Michael BENDEKOWITSCH,
Stefan SABARA, Alois TSCHENTSCHITSCH, Franz TSCHENTSCHITSCH, Josef
PALKOWITSCH, Josef FILIPOWITSCH, Adelheid GEOSCHITSCH, Josef STUBITSCH; 4 $:
Theresia KISCH, Josef TSCHENTSCHITSCH, ; 3 $: Johann GEOSCHITSCH, Johann
JELOSCHITSCH, Anna BRZKOWITSCH, Paul TSCHENTSCHITSCH, Alois KNOPF, Franz
TSCHENTSCHITSCH, Rosa BAUMANN, Josef STEIER, Georg NOWOGORATZ, Franz
NOWOGORATZ, Johann MRAKOVITSCH; 2 $: Theresia STUBITSCH, Johann KISCH, Ignaz
BENDEKOWITSCH, Rosa MARTH, Franz TSCHENTSCHITSCH, Johann SCHIMON, Theresia
DOGMANITSCH; 1 $: Georg GEOSCHITSCH, Alois SABARA, Stefan TSCHENTSCHITSCH,
Rosa TSCHENTSCHITSCH, Rosa STUBITSCH, Stefan MILKOWITSCH, Johann HANDLER,
Theresia HANDLER, Josef GEOSCHITSCH, Rosa GEOSCHITSCH, Gisela GEOSCHITSCH;
Edlitz: 5 $: Josef STUBITSCH; 3 $: Florian WINDISCH; 2 $: Stefan STUBITSCH,
Georg GARGER, Stefan BOCK, Anna GARGER; 1 $: Johann SUPPER, Franz LUISSER,
Josef WOLF, Alois WOLF, Thomas EBERHARDT, Stefan BOCK sen., Viktoria
STUBITSCH; Harmisch: 5 $: Stefan STUBITSCH, Michael STUBITSCH, Johann
STUBITSCH, Alois STUBITSCH, Alois STUBITSCH; Johann MILISCHITSCH, Georg
TSCHENTSCHITSCH; 4 $: Franz STUBITSCH; 2 $: Georg STUBITSCH, Stefan
STUBITSCH, Maria HANDLER, Josef LIEBEZEIT, Johann BRZKOWITSCH, Anna
GEOSCHITSCH, Franz STUBITSCH, Josef NEMETH, Stefan NOWOGORATZ; 3 $: Franz
BRZKOWITSCH, Alois SCHUCH, Anna STUBITSCH, Michael LUIPERSBEK, Josef
STUBITSCH, Stefan BENDEKOWITSCH, Matthias TANGL, Maik NOWOGORATZ, Matthias
NOWOGORATZ, Franz STUBITSCH; 1 $: Johann LUIPERSBEK, Georg TSCHENTSCHITSCH,
Meri MILISCHITSCH, JosefNOWOGORATZ, Josef NOWOGORATZ; Kroatisch-Ehrensdorf: 5
$: Stefan PALKOWITSCH, Ignaz SCHIPITSCH, Georg KISCH, Johann TSCHENTSCHITSCH;
3 $:
Johann SCHUCH, Stefan STUBITSCH, Josef MILISCHITSCH; 2 $: Josef EBERHARDT,
Vinzenz STUMPF, Josef PALKOWITSCH, Stefan TITZ, Johann TITZ, Georg
MILKOWITSCH, Stefan PALKOWITSCH, Ignaz FLANDORFER, Josef WINKELBAUER, Stefan
MILKOWITSCH, Rosa TSCHENTSCHITSCH, Josef KISCH, Stefan PALKOWITSCH; 1 $:
Johann FILIPOWITSCH, Franz LUIPERSBEK, Franz TSCHENTSCHITSCH, Johann
PALKOWITSCH, Rosa MARTH, Josef LEITGEB, Khedi MILKOWITSCH, Stefan
TSCHENTSCHITSCH; 0.50 $: Johann TSCHENTSCHITSCH; 5 $: Josef LEGATH, Deutsch
Schtzen; 3 $: Maria PRELOWSKY, Ponitz; 2 $: Mary JANISCH, Steinfurt; Josef
JANY, Prostrum; Johann MRAKOWITSCH, Winten; Johann TAMDER, Glasing; Franz
KNOR, Prostrum; 1 $: Lukas PURKER, Grodorf; Josef NEMETH, Steinfurt; Leo
LEIER, Moschendorf, Josef FRHMANN, Urbersdorf; Karl MRAKOWITSCH, Hasendorf;
Johanna LAKY, Maria LAKY and Alois STUBITSCH, Winten; Franz DEUTSCH, Rax;
Georg POTZMANN, Pernau; Nikolaus PREISZL, Schauka; Josef STRIMI, Deutsch
Schtzen; Georg NEMETH, Prostrum; Franz REICHL, Zahling; Stefan POTZMANN,
Pernau; Georg GRAFL, Kho-Fidisch; 0.50 $: Julius MATHOFFER, Bocksdorf; Georg
HUGMANN, Deutsch Schtzen; Stefan SKRAPICS, Prostrum; Peter UNGER, Strem;
Adolf MARTIN, Deutsch Schtzen; Julius GMOSER, Zahling; Karl UNGER, Strem;
Rudolf GAAL, Julius BREIER, Zahling; Gregor BAUMANN, Josef BAUMANN, Deutsch
Schtzen; Eduard SCHMIEDT, Zahling; 0.40 $: Franz WOLF, Kalk; 0.25 $: Josef
GABRIEL, Badersdorf; Josef UNGER, Deutsch Schtzen; Josef WIESLER,
Moschendorf; Johann WINDISCH, Deutsch Schtzen; Franz SCHRAMMEL, Moschendorf;
Josef WAGNER, Kho-Fidisch.

MAUTHAUSEN AND GREETINGS FROM EISENSTADT
ED.-Member Maureen Tighe-Brown recently flew to Budapest and Eisenstadt to
continue her demographic Burgenland Jewish research work-she sends the
following):

"After I read the wonderful description of the Elderhostel trip and
Mauthausen, my curiosity was peaked about the identity of the various groups
of prisoners. So I posted a request for information with sources on H-Sig,
the Hungarian branch of Jewishgen.

Here is an excellent, footnoted post that I received from the head of H-Sig,
Louis Schonfeld, which may be of interest to you and our group (you will note
that 'prisoner' is apparently defined differently here than by the
Elderhostel guide, but the number of dead Jews has been documented at Yad
Vashem as accurate:"-Maureen

<<"The number of prisoners who passed through Mauthausen is estimated at
199,404. It is believed that 119,000 of them died, of whom 38,120 were
Jews....The suffering of the Mauthausen internees has been expressed in the
Greek composer Mikis Theodorakis's Ballad of Mauthausen, based on a work by
the Greek Jewish poet Jackob Kambanelis." quoted from the Encyclopedia of
the Holocaust, Vol. 3 p952. Edited by Israel Guttman, 1990." Louis Schonfeld>>

By the way, I met Gerhard Lang (Eisenstadt) tonight and we chatted outside my
hotel here in Eisenstadt. It was most enjoyable, and it was great to meet
him in person after he was so kind to facilitate my hotel here and also my
work in the two archives. GO, BBUNCHERS! (Maureen)

Maureen also met member Fritz Knigshofer in Budapest. He writes: "I am
unfortunately lacking any time here in Budapest, even for e-mail. Tomorrow
afternoon I fly to Klagenfurt to see my parents in Krumpendorf, then on
Sunday I travel to Tirana, Albania. One thing I barely, but fortunately,
managed in Budapest was to meet Maureen Tighe-Brown. She was dug in the
Library every day, from the opening bell to the last call to leave the
building."

(ED.-for those of you unfamiliar with Maureen's work, I'm appending a recent
message)

She writes: "Without reading the BBunch newsletters, I would not have
expected to find this treasure trove of data, and hence would not have
thought to contact the archivist ahead of time. I suppose I would have
dropped in just to introduce myself, and not have been prepared as to how to
arrange my time. At the very least, I will be able to reconstruct the
population trends from 1883. I will ask Dr. Zelfel if these records can be
microfilmed; if not, and if they are for each individual by name, all I can
do for now is count up the births, marriages, and deaths per year, and also
count up the male occupations involved. I'm also sending this on to you for
what it may be worth to my companion BBunchers. On my return, I will let you
all know the exact amount of detail. For the 1773 records, which are on a
microfilm I bought from the Magyarorsza'g Leve'ltar, the births, marriages,
and deaths are not listed by individual name, but are totaled by religion and
by event occurrences for male (or father or spouse, for children and females)
status (peasant, noble, itinerant, and such). As you probably know, it will
be crucial for me to locate the total village population for as many years as
possible, so I can tell the amount of population growth. Isn't this
exciting? I owe a tremendous debt to the BBunch. Thanks as always.
Incidentally, I have copied all the BBunch newsletters in text format onto a
floppy disk, and am taking 3 such disks with me as gifts to interested people
I meet. They will be thrilled."

AVAILABILITY OF CONVERSION AND/OR BAPTISM RECORDS
(helped by Rev. Paul Reicher, Betty Jean/Theresa Horrum & Dr.Conrad
Christianson)

ED. Note: For some time I've wondered what type of conversion records might
have been kept during the Reformation and Counter Reformation. I've never
seen or heard of any. Since large groups of people were involved ( they would
have included all under a particular "Herrschaft"-in that period "he who
rules decides religion"- as formulated by the Treaty of Augsburg-1555), a
conversion record could almost be viewed as a census and an invaluable
genealogical source. Beginning AD 1517 and continuing into the 18th Century,
the Reformation and its Counter are periods during which genealogical records
are very sparse. Since many people would have converted from one faith to
another moved by the winds of politics, war and spirit, understanding of the
conditions under which we can expect to find records has value. I do not
have the expertise to delve into these matters, so I posed the question to
members Betty Jean/Theresa Horrum and Rev. Paul Reicher and family friend and
former pastor, Rev. Dr. Conrad Christianson. Rev. Reicher's Answer Follows:

"I found your e-mail very fascinating. Particularly interesting was the story
about Rev. Alexander Berghold. It is wonderful that you can make so many
connections now with the name "Berghold." I wish I knew something of past
procedures with regard to the recording of "conversions" to the various
Christian denominations. As you know it was not until the 17th century that
catholicism was "victorious" in Austria. One of the "sub" themes of the
Pestsaeule on the Graben in Wien was the ascendancy of the catholic church
over the reformers. If there were wholesale returns to the catholic faith at
that time I doubt if they would have been recorded. The same would hold true
for those regions of Europe affected by the Peace of Augsburg. As commoners
were forced to follow the religion of the local ruler I cannot imagine that
there was an actual recording of names. One person who may have some grasp of
the situation might be the chief archivist at the Bishop's residence in
Vienna. When I was searching for my mother's baptismal records back in 1961
he proved to be an invaluable source of information and helped me find the
correct church of my mother's baptism. In those days baptisms were not only
recorded at the local church but also in a general archive at the bishop's
residence. Whoever the archivist might be today might have some knowledge of
more ancient practices.

Today when a person already baptized in Christian denomination other than
Catholic expresses an interest in or a desire to become Catholic, that person
would become a part of the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults (RCIA).
Depending on the parish this will be a process of anywhere from 9 months to
several years. The person joins with other "inquirers" and gradually is
formed in an understanding of Catholic life and practice. After that period
of formation, if the person desires to become a Catholic, the time of formal
reception into the Catholic community takes place at the Easter Vigil, a
rather lengthy liturgy that takes place the Saturday evening before Easter
Sunday. There is no "re-baptism." The person makes what we call a Profession
of Faith. The names of such persons are recorded in the baptismal records of
the parish noting that they were received into the Church through "Profession
of Faith." That is essentially the practice today. In the more distant past,
individuals desirous of becoming Catholic were given individual instructions
by one of the parish priests and then privately received into the church.

In those days there was the practice of "conditional" baptism. i.e. the
formula for baptism was "If you are not baptized, I baptize you......etc.
Then, of course the name would be recorded in the parish baptismal archive. I
would say that was the standard practice for a good long time up till the
1960's when the RCIA was introduced or should I say "reintroduced." A period
of formation for inquirers was the practice in the early church. The process
was called the "Catechumenate."
I doubt if this has been very helpful to you. The key question is when we
began to record the names of "converts" to the Catholic Church. And I can
give no definitive response to that question. Peace, Paul

Betty Jean Horrum received the following information through Archbishop E.
Curtis:

"Dear Mrs. Horrum, A 3/27/98 "e-mail" from Gerry Berghold was forwarded to me
for information relating to his questions about converts from Roman
Catholicism to the Lutheran Church and vice versa during the time of the
Reformation or the latter period of Counter Reformation. Apparently he is
researching a family genealogy for the Berghold family and has come across,
or is in search of, this kind of activity.

I have no knowledge about the requirements that existed for the Lutheran or
Reformed Churches in terms of receiving once baptized Catholic persons. In
that historical time there would have been ecclesiastical penalty levied
against a Roman Catholic who departed the Church for another church or who
renounced the faith of the Church. This penalty could have involved
excommunication, suspension or some punitive or remedial penalty. Lifting
these ecclesiastical penalties would have required the action of a Catholic
bishop before the Catholic person could be reconciled, perform the prescribed
penance and return to active participation in the Roman Catholic Church.

If a non-Catholic person sought to enter the Roman Catholic Church in that
historical period, there would have been a required period of instruction
with a priest. This instruction would have included detailed presentation of
the Creed, the Commandments and the Sacraments. While Martin Luther
developed the instructional device of the "catechism" in the age of the
printing press, these convenient compendia of Church teaching also existed in
the Roman Catholic Church. A non-Catholic but baptized person would have
been "conditionally" baptized at the time of his admission into the Roman
Catholic Church. There would have been absolute "confirmation", depending
upon the age of the individual. In the Reformation time, and down to the
modern times of the late 1960's, the "conditional" baptism would have taken
place apart from Catholic Mass. The reception of "confirmation" would have
taken place at the hand of a bishop, whether within or apart from Catholic
Mass would have been a function of the particular place.

In the current time period, if a non-Catholic - whether baptized in another
Christian denomination or unbaptized- seeks membership in the Roman Catholic
Church then that person is given instruction in the basic teaching, practices
and discipline of the Church so that he/she understands what is expected of
him, why it is believed or practiced and allow the person the time to
consider whether he/she can assume this way of life. The ordinary means for
this instruction is parish or congregation based and is called the "RCIA" or
the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults. It usually spans the period of
mid-September until the Easter of the next spring or approximately once
weekly for 6 months. This process concludes with a ceremony of baptism or
the public profession of faith, joined by confirmation and the reception of
holy communion. The context is Catholic Mass at the Easter Vigil on the
Saturday evening prior to Easter Sunday. In the historical reality and in the
present practice there is a record made of all persons who are baptized (even
if "conditionally"), confirmed or received holy communion. This is kept at
the parish church where the action occurs. The pastor or parish priest is
responsible for overseeing the instruction, verifying the readiness of the
individual for the admission into the church and the recording of the action.
I hope this information will be helpful to you. Sincerely yours,
Reverend Michael F. Gutgsell, Chancellor, Archdiocese of Omaha."

Rev. Christianson says: "Thanks for copying me regarding this subject.
Suffice it to say that most likely in earlier years, there would be some
record of 'rebaptism' for persons changing from one religious practice to the
other. I'm not sure what kind of requirements might have been made in the
past, nearer to the point of the Reformation. I imagine that an abjuration
would have been required. Whether or not this would have been recorded in
the parish register is always a question. You've asked a very interesting
question. I hope some of your correspondents will have more acquaintance
with the documents. I can only speak from an exceedingly brief experience.
I have only ever had one request from a Roman Diocese as to the baptismal
status of an individual, and a transfer of membership is simply something
that does not exist for Romans. We are all, theoretically, subject to the
bishop of the diocese in which we reside. "

SUMMATION:
Our thanks to all who participated in this project. While the results are
inclusive, we can assume that records of conversions during the Reformation
period do not exist, although there may be local exceptions. Given their age
and the vicissitudes of war, even that hope is nebulous.

It thus follows that Burgenland baptism records (all faiths) are available
from 1828 forward (when parishes were required to maintain and submit copies
of records to a central archive), generally available from about 1770 to
1828 (Joseph II's Toleration Patent made records state property and enforced
preservation), partially available from 1690 to 1770 (following the Turkish
expulsion from Vienna many churchs were destroyed), very fragmentary from
1547 to 1690 (although made mandatory by the 1547-Council of Trent-they exist
only for those parishes or archives not destroyed by the Turks or during the
civil unrest which followed). One source (Felix Gundacker) says that of this
latter period, only a death register of St. Stephen's, Vienna exists.

>From this it appears that we must proceed in the following manner:
1921-present, some LDS microfilm, reference local parish records-visit or
write
1896-1921-use LDS microfilm of civil records, reference Hungarian municipal
civil records
1828-1896-use LDS microfilm of Hungarian Archive copies (some earlier years
are included)
1770-1828-frequently available at the local parish-visit or write
1547-1770-visit Archives of the Diocese of Eisenstadt or the Lutheran AB of
Burgenland
In the absence of baptism records, we must turn our attention to other types
of records, many of which we have already seen through the efforts of the
Burgenland Bunch staff and members.
(newsletter continued as number 37A & B)

END OF NEWSLETTER-EDITED & DISTRIBUTED BY GERALD J. BERGHOLD, Contact
for information about the Burgenland Bunch.

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