BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L Archives

Archiver > BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER > 1999-07 > 0931087382


From: <>
Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 38 dtd 30 Jun 1998 (edited)
Date: Sun, 4 Jul 1999 07:23:02 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 38
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND GENEALOGY
(issued biweekly by )
June 30, 1998
(all rights reserved)

"People can change their clothes, politics, spouses, religions, and
philosophies, but they cannot change their grandfathers." Horace Kallen,
American philosopher

This section of newsletter 38 (which is in three sections) deals with
"villages", containing articles about Gamischdorf, Schallendorf, Neuberg,
Guttenbach, Rauchwart, Bocksdorf, Village Names, a Clue to Finding Villages,
Szcsny (Hungary), the Bakony Hills, Tobaj and Village of Apetlon & Thell
Family.

ED.-Note for new members. The numbered village series appearing in BB
newsletters were researched and written by Father Gratian Leser of the
Franciscan Cloister in Gssing (for the Gssinger Zeitung in the1920' s and
early 1930' s). In the 1950's they were shortened and edited by Josef Karl
Homma (then the director of the Landesarchiv) for the bi-weekly "Volk und
Heimat" (now a quarterly- some articles of the current edition available at
<http://www.bukeb.at:81/vbw/vbw.htm>;). Those we're publishing in the BB
newsletters are shortened & translated (by Albert Schuch) extracts taken from
the "Volk und Heimat" articles. Scan these lists for your family names. You
will probably never find any reference to records which are older than these.
Look for similar spellings of your names. A good clue as to how long your
families may have been in the Burgenland. We plan to cover all Burgenland
villages.

24) Gamischdorf (continuation of the father leser Village Series by Albert
Schuch).

Old variations of the Gamischdorf village name (1428-1599): Kemenfalva,
Kemenfalwa, Kemynfalva (in German = Hartdorf), in 1608 "Kemenfalva anders
[otherwise] Gamersdorf", in the 17th and 18th century mostly Gamersdorf or
Gamischdorf, since ca. 1850 the Hungarian name was Gancs. Batthyny property
since 1524. Ancient settlement of the area was proved in 1890, when teacher
Adolf KNIGSDORFER [translator's note: correct would be KNIGSHOFER, this is
the great-grandfather of BBunch member Fritz KNIGSHOFER] unearthed two stone
axes.

In 1662, noble inhabitants were Peter, Franz and Stefan RADOSTICS. The
Radostics also had possessions in Rauchwart and a house in Gssing. In 1730
Adam RADOSTICS donated the money for the first chapel of Gamischdorf. In 1742
Count Ludwig Batthyny bought the belongings of the RADOSTICS family for 6600
fl.

Village council in 1745: Matthias PAUER (Richter), Matthias JANDRISICH,
Michael HEBER, Hans, Georg, Michael and Matthias EBERHARD. Families in 1745:
8 JANDRICHICH; 6 EBERHARD, PAUER; 5 HOANTZL; 4 KRAMER; 1 DLUES (?),
GAMILLISCH, SCHRANTZL, BRUNNER, HEBER; 2 HAMMER, RSEGH, NEUSIEDL.

In 1846 all rabbits and birds were killed in a hailstorm. In 1876 seven
houses burned down. Inhabitants: 1812 - 117; 1832 - 265; 1929 - 289. Church
built in 1846, renovated in 1865. In the old times the dead were buried in
St. Michael, in 1812 Gamischdorf already had a cemetery of itsown. Elementary
School probably built in 1833. Teachers: Anton MARX (1833-37), Michael PAUER
(1839-48), Anton MARX (1849-79), Josef FREY (1880-84), Johann MAYER
(1884-86), Adolf KNIGSHOFER (1886-1901), Johann Nepomuk BEIDL (1901-07),
Franz SIMON (1907-16), Karl BEIDL (1917-24), Josef MKLER (1924-). (source:
V+H Nr. 16-17/1957)

25) Schallendorf

First mentioned in 1698 as "Soledorff", was purely Croatian up to at least
1832. Inhabitants: 1814 - 117; 1929 - 184 (32 houses.) Father Gratian Leser
writes that the community denied him access to the Gemeindearchiv, hence was
not able to write more about this village. (source: V+H Nr. 17-18/1957)

26) Neuberg

Probably founded by Croatian immigrants in the 16th century; 1750: Paul
CZVITKOVICH (Richter), Ive BOHETICH, Jure KOLLOVICH, Ive TARICH, Christian
KOVACS (Geschworene); surnames in 1750: RADOSTICH (7), KOLLOVICH (7),
CZVITKOVICH (5), KOVACS (5), NOVASEL (5), BOHETICH (4), IFKOVICH (3), GERGICS
(2), MARCSANICH (2), TARICH, TOBSICH, HANSICH, GROFF; 1854-59 Neuberg
belonged to the Bezirkskommissariat Gropetersdorf, 1854 - ca. 1859 to the
Stuhlrichteramt Gssing, 1863-67 to the Stuhlrichteramt Mischendorf, in 1879
again to Gssing; 480 inhabitants in 1812, 1126 in 1929; ca. 200 emigrants to
America (until 1929); 23 casualties in WW I; Neuberg belonged to St. Michael
parish 1605-1847; a wooden chapel built in 1742, donated by Georg JANDRESICS,
renovated in 1771; 1818 Prince Philipp BATTHYANY built a vicarage, later a
church was built with his support; first parish priest (1847) Mark KOVATSITS;
the church as it exists today was built in 1888, renovated in 1924; priests:
Mark KOVATSITS (1847-64), Stefan DORNER (1864-76), Franz BARKOVITS (1876-94),
Dr. Ludwig FISCHER (1894-95), Matthias BALOG (1895-97), Josef STRASZNER
(1897-1905), Josef OSTOVITS (1909-11), Josef KUNTAR (1911-18), Ludwig MERSICH
(1918-25), Franz MAGYAR (1925), Ignaz HORVATH (1925-). In 1832 Franz SVETICS
from Stegersbach (aged 32) was teacher, his son is said to have been a high
ranking army officer; later teachers: Vitus GRADNER (1857-67), Franz KAPS,
Franz EISINGERITS, Karl BENCSITS, Philipp LINSER, Josef KRAXNER, Geza KISS,
Oskar MIKULA, Stefan PUSZTAY, in 1929 Julius KUZMITS with Anton RAFFEINER and
Anna RAFFEINER nee BIRICZ. (source: V+H Nr. 18-19/1957)

27) Gttenbach

Old name "Ujfalu" (1428); surnames in 1750: RADAKOVITS (15), HAJZSAN (7),
KNAR (4), JANDRISITS (4), STUBITS (3), MUHR (2), BENSEKOVITS (1),
HERTZEGOVITS (1). Georg, Johann and Matthias RADAKOVITS were members of the
lesser nobility, their ancestor Johann RADAKOVITS had been ennobled in 1599
by Emperor Rudolph, together with his siblings Nikolaus, Georg, Gregor,
Thomas and Agatha. Inhabitants: 1812: 425; 1832: 420; 1929: 935; 33
casualties in WW I; ca. 200 emigrants to America (until 1929). Part of St.
Michael parish until 1847, later on of Neuberg parish. Chapel (St. Patrick)
built in 1763, enlarged in 1837-8; torn down in 1929, new church built at the
same place. Known teachers: Franz KLUDOVATZ (1853-63), Georg VEIKOVITS
(1864-66), Johann ILLETITS (1867-70); in 1929 Rosa GORGOSILICH and Franz
BUBICH. (source: V+H Nr. 19/1957)

28) Rauchwart

One of the oldest settlements of the Gssing district, probably founded by
Hungarian border guards. Inhabitants in 1756 [note: probably should read
1750]: Georg MARINKOVITS (Richter), Michael PAUER, Martin MARX, Matthias
KREUTZER, Matthias HOANDL, Matthias KANAPES, Michael BOJESICS, Michael
ERKINGER (Geschworene); surnames: PAUER, KAPETZKY, MURLASITS, PEISCHEL,
POMPER, KREUTZER, ERKINGER, BOJCICS, KASSANICS, HOADL, GASSIAN, HOANTZL,
KRAMMER, MARX, WAGNER, KHARBERGER, NOVAKOVITS, KANAPES, EBERHARDT, WEBER,
GRAFF, BADTER, STEINER, FRIEMANN, KOLLERICH, NIKISCHER, RICHTER, MARINKOVICH,
TSCHANDL, SLOKLIKLOVITS, HUSNER, DROBICS, LAGLER, TROPFEL, STBER,
HOBELITSCH, SISSINGER, PUFF, SALLAMON, RADOSTICS, GROSZBAUER, KRANTZ,
HOCHHOFFER, KLEMENDT, HADL, MARAKOVITS, HIRSCHBCK, KOBERICS.In 1848 Anton
HANZ was drafted; instead of him, his brother Johann went into the army
against the payment of 80 florins; Anton also vowed to support Johann, in
case he would return physically handicapped from his military service. In
1900 36 houses burned down. Comtess Theodora KOTTULINSKY bought the local
BATTHYANY estate in 1892, sold it to a Budapest Bank. In 1917 Anton HIRSCH
bought most of it. Inhabitants: 500 in 1812; 490 in 1832, plus 140 "in den
Bergen" (in the (surrounding) hills) = 630; 887 in 1929 (in 135 houses); Part
of St. Michael parish, church built in 1853. Teacher Josef HEIM married the
widow Theresia SAURING on 11 Apr 1812. Other teachers and notaries: Johann
SZAKATSY (notary 1829-42), THOMEDITS (notary 1842), Johann WEBER (notary
1846), G. TITZ (notary 1848-50), Josef KORSCHINEK (teacher and notary
1851-53), HANDLER (teacher and notary 1881), Theodor MERKL (1881-84), Johann
TRINKL (1884-86), Anton HORVATH (1886-93), Karl BEIDL (1893-1913), (1913-)
Koloman KNIGSHOFER. Teachers of the second class: Franziska GARAUS
(1908-12), Anna KNIGSHOFER nee KOLLER (1912-). [note: Anna & Koloman
KNIGSHOFER were the grandparents of BB-member Fritz KNIGSHOFER.]
(source: V+H Nr. 19-20/1957)

29) Bocksdorf

In 1668 Count Christoph BATTHYANY gave a sessio to Peter MISICS, sessios
to Mert PELZMANN, Adam KRIBER, Michael LAISZ, Philipp HANS and Mert TIMSEL,
for faithul services. Data from the 1750 Urbarium: Georg POTZMANN (Richter),
Matthias ERNST, Matthias WAPPEL, Michael WEBER, Paul STROBEL. Surnames:
PELZMANN (11), POTZMANN (7), ISOVICH (4), POMPER (5), ROSENKRANZ (4),
STETTNER (4), LAMMINGER (3), WEINGRLL (2), KNAR (2), FLECK (2), STROBEL (2),
POSCH (2), TREIBER (2), PUBER (2), ERKINGER (2), SCHABHTL (2), ROHRBECKER,
DECKER, STABER, SAUERZOPF, FUIK, OSWALD, KOBER, OFFNER, SCHRETTNER, GARTLER,
ROSNER, WEINBERGER, ERNST, KRAMMER, HAMMER, WAGNER, EBERHARD, LAGLER,
HOBIZAN, FISCHL, WAPPEL, STR, BAUMGARTNER, CSAR, HASELBACHAR, NEUBAUER,
WEBER. The mill rented by Matthias WAPPEL. The mill still existed in 1930,
newly built by Julius TECHET. 64 casualties in WW I. 695 inhabitants in 1812,
767 in 1832, 1490 in 1930 (in 200 houses). Bocksdorf is an old parish, was
Lutheran in the 17th century. In 1698 the villages Olbendorf, Rohr and
Heugraben belonged to Bocksdorf parish, of which Heugraben was Croatian, the
others were German. Today's church built 1777-79. Priests: Georg SCHAGER
(1698), Matthias MARINICS (1738-44), Matthias BEHOVCHICH (1744-71), Jakob
KOVACSICS (1771-78), Georg LEGATH (1778), Johann SZOKOLY (1778-83), Matthias
HUTTER (1783-1808), Josef SCHAFFER (1808-45), Georg SCHAFFER (1845-74), Josef
EBERHARD (1874), Josef STERR (1874-84), Vinzenz PEHAM (1884), Franz HATZL
(1884-1904), Josef BENCSICS (1904-14), Ludwig KISS (1914-27), Anton HAWRANEK
(1927-28), Karl HOLZERMANN (1928-29), Gregor Wilhelm NAUEN (1929), Father
Karl BAYER (1929-). Teachers: Martin GRASINGER (1751), Georg DERGOSICS
(1757), Josef GRASINGER (1780), Andreas DORR (1804 - at least 1812), Franz
SCHREINER (1832), Anton KUBICK (1838-59), Johann PAVALEK (died 1864 at the
age 34), Johann ILLETITS (1876), Josef FELDHOFER, Karl SCHULLER (1884-99),
Heinrich CZADILEK (1899-1926), today (1930): Hans GILL, Franz STROBL, Fritz
DWORSCHAK and Mizzi WILFING (180 pupils) (source: V+H Nr. 20/1957-1/1958)

VILLAGE NAMES-POSTING FROM WGW QUERY BOARD (query re Hungarian village posted
by Viktor Fischer-answer from Janos Bogardi)
The place name Szcheny has alternative spellings Szecseny, Szecheny,
Szechen, Szcsny etc. Up to the second half of the 19th century, grammar was
not as established as it is today. Different people wrote the same words
differently. There were places in Hungary that had identical names up to
1873. In 1873 a commission was set up to give unique names to every
settlement.

In the case of Szcheny it means that there were Szecseny's in Nograd County
(it is called Szcsny even today), in Vas County (Vasszcsny), in Somogy
County (Szcsny, eventually Szecseny) and maybe some others, too. (I do not
have a gazetteer here, there might be others, too.) Before 1873 these
settlements were alluded to like Szecseny in Nograd County or Szecseny in Vas
County. Still, there could be cases when two settlements were in the same
county, like the Doroszlo ones, both in Vas County (now called Kszegdoroszl
and Csknydoroszl). The reason I gave Vasszcsny for you is because it is
in Vas County, close to Szombathely and even Kszeg. Vasszcsny has had a
Roman Catholic parish, its church registers are available from the end of the
18th century.

VILLAGE CLUE-INTERESTING QUESTION LEADS TO ANCESTORS' VILLAGE
(from Joe Amant, Gerry Berghold, Joe Jarfass & Ernest Chrisbacher)
<< I found your home page by typing the word "GYIROT" in the search
engine.Your home page was the first to appear. I do not know what that means.
I found the word in one of the postcards I mentioned. It looked like a proper
name (perhaps a town) so I used it. >>

ED.-Well hello and thanks for your interesting question. We have a few things
in common. I was born and raised in Allentown. All four grandparents
emigrated there around 1900 from the Burgenland. German was the main language
followed by Hungarian (the further east you went, the more Hungarian) and
Serbo-Croatian. Gyor is a city about 60 miles east of the Austrian border not
far from the Neusiedler See. There are many towns and villages nearby that
have "Gyor" as part of their spelling.

With that said, let me say that one of the interesting things about this
business is the puzzle solving that goes with it. You were very lucky to have
a search engine find "Gyirot" which is the Hungarian name for the village of
"Kroatisch Geresdorf"-a village in the central part of today's Austrian
Burgenland. The name appears in our list of members (one of our university
people is studying Croatian villages in the Burgenland). As you can imagine,
as names change from one language to another, they can easily get lost. One
of the things we do is help match them up.

Kroatisch Geresdorf (KG) is just east of Oberpullendorf (which is south of
Eisenstadt-the capitol of the Burgenland) and is today part of Nikitsch along
with Kroatisch Minihof-about 1750 inhabitants. Very near the Hungarian
border. Having found a post card with the name doesn't necessarily mean your
people came from there but since it's from your grandparent's brother it's a
good possibility. Send me the rest of what is written -particularly the
addresses and names Don't let the "Kroatisch" bother you, I feel your names
are German. "Kroatisch" means the village was originally established by
Croatians (early 1500's). Of course many Croatians still live
there.(ED.-although it later transpired that the ancestral village in his
case was not KG, but Bakony Szentlaszlo, a Hungarian village in the Bakony
Hills, the postcard pointed the way after some further sleuthing by BB
members Joe Jarfass and Ernest Chrisbacher).
You also say <<My grandfather's name was Amant (I know that does not sound
German or Hungarian) and my grandmothers name was Bauerhuber.>>

Neither of these names is familar to me, but they could have been changed
upon immigration. I'd like the names shown on the correspondence you have.
"Huber" is quite common and "Bauerhuber" means "Farmer Huber". Neither name
appears in the KG phone book or in nearby villages. Over 40M people emigrated
from the region to the US around 1900 so you don't always find descendants
still living there. (E. Chrisbacher subsequently found Bauerhubers in his
files).

KG has a Catholic church and the records 1827-1895 are available from the LDS
(Mormon Church) at Salt lake City. So you could find your grandparents'
baptisms and parents names if they came from there. The film number is
0700784 and an LDS Family History Center is located near the 15th street exit
of the Allentown bypass (RT 22?). Look in the phone book.

THE BAKONY HILLS OF HUNGARY-(southeast of Gyor) ED. This region has figured
prominently in recent BB articles (Knigshofer travels, German dialect, etc.)
and now the above article. A Germanic enclave within today's Hungary near
Burgenland. The following is pertinent.

The Bakony region was settled by German colonists. In the series "The
Making of Europe", a recent volume "The Peasantry of Europe", Werner
Rosener, 1995, Blackwell Press, says the following (p131)-"the struggle to
expel the Turks (1686)....had left large sections of the Pannonian basin
depopulated. At first German (read Austrian as well) peasants began to occupy
marginal districts in a disorderly fashion; however, owners of large estates
thereupon assumed control of resettlement efforts. Thus German ethnic
enclaves were established in the Bakony Forest, in the hilly country near
Buda and in the Baranya....after the Treaty of Passarowitz (1718)....a major
wave of colonization (began); it reached its peak under Empress Maria
Theresa....it was not just the Germans who arrived ....immigrants came from
Swabia, the Palatinate and even as far away as Lorraine. They were personally
free and given their farms on a hereditary basis." While not part of the
Burgenland the Bakony region is close enough to merit our attention.

TOBAJ (from Bob Schatz)
If I may add a little more information on the name of Tobaj, Arnold Magyar,
O.F.M. in his 340 Jahre Franziskaner in Gu"ssing [340 Years of the
Franciscans in Gu"ssing] (p. 197) states that the village name was originally
Thobayd (1428) and had evolved to Thobaj by 1538. He also states that the
German name for the village was Tubersdorf. (ED.-well I sort of thought the
"mercy" definition was sort of tongue in cheek-made too good a story!)

VILLAGE OF APETLON & THELL FAMILY (ED: A very early BB query which generated
a lot of interest and which shows the possibilities which exist for someone
just starting this fascinating research. Repeated because it sets the stage
for basic Burgenland research and may not have been seen by many current
members).

<< I am writing to you to see if there is any basic info re our family, which
is not a real common name. My grandparents were Frank THELL and Mary (Pitzl)
THELL from Apetlon, Austria, and they immigrated about 1912-1914.They were
Roman Catholic and went from Apetlon to (ultimately) Saint Paul, MN, USA. My
great uncle, for whom my father and I were named, was Rudolph Thell also. He
attempted to emigrate but was refused entry after getting to Ellis Island
when he could not conceal a health problem. He returned to Apetlon where I
believe he died. >>

Reply: I'm a 2nd generation US Burgenla"nder and although I've made two
extensive trips to the Burgenland, most of my knowledge has come from
extensive research here in the US using LDS microfilm. My 4 grandparents were
all from the Gu"ssing-Jennersdorf area (southern), so I have limited
information re the northern part although I've visited the "Seewinkel". A
description of Apetlon in a Burgenland Bunch newsletter follows. One of the
bu"rgermeisters was named Thell.

APETLON; (Ba'nfalu, Moson Megye); 0 21 75; 7143-District of Neusiedl. N, in
the "Seewinkel" ( lake corner). Located E of the southern part of the
Neusiedler See, 4 km from the Hungarian border. SE of Illmitz. . Market
community. Pop. 1937, houses 794. Post office, school, police station,
municipal office. First mentioned in written records in AD1410. Settled by
emigrants from Schwabia, region of the Bodensee. Early settlers Trinkl and
Winkler. Often destroyed by war. Aristocratic family, Nadasdy, then
Esterhazy. Bu"rgermeister names from 1919, Ko"gl, Go"ltl, Weiss, Gangl,
Winkler, Thell*, Preiner, Loos, Munzenrieder, Reinprecht, Opitz, Koppi. 244
emigrants to the US between 1888 and 1930. First emigrant name, Michael
Adrian, 1880. LDS 0700878-9; 0700376-7.

*Stefan Thell, b1892; d1968. Served 1939-1945.
A Herbert Thell is (was?) municipal office notary (Amtma"nner) from 1980-fwd.
(1993)

Ba'nfalu is the Hungarian name of Apetlon, which was in Moson county (most of
Burgenland was in Vas Megye). Numbers are area code and zip. LDS numbers are
the library call numbers of microfilm of Apetlon church and civil records
from the LDS (Mormon) library in Salt Lake City. You can order (nominal
charge) and read them (German and Hungarian-not difficult) at any LDS Family
History Center. You should be able to trace at least 3 or 4 generations of
Thells and Pitzl's this way. A 1983 history of Apetlon exists. It's in German
and I have a copy (courtesy of Dale Knebel). First Pitzls and Thells are
briefly mentioned in a 1675 "Urbarium" (listing of inhabitants). Not
mentioned in 1589 so it looks like they migrated sometime between those
dates. Apetlon inhabitants were Catholic from about 1410, Lutheran from the
late 1500's (under the Nadasdy's who converted) until about 1658 when they
reverted again to Catholicism under the Esterhazys. There are no Lutheran
records extant, having been destroyed during the Turkish wars.

The Seewinkel (as well as a lot of the Burgenland) was devastated and
depopulated before, during and after the 2nd siege of Vienna (1683).
Inhabitants took refuge in the walled city of Bruck. Many peasants who
weren't killed by the Turks were carried off as slaves. As a result, German
speaking immigrants were encouraged to colonize the depopulated land (to
resume food production as well as to provide a buffer against Hungarian
aspirations and further Turkish incursions). Most German speaking colonists
came from German Bavaria or Styria (Austria). This is not to say that there
might not have been Thells prior to that date. Germans have been coming to
this area since the 9th Century. My German speaking ancestors' names are
listed in many early records and somehow survived the terrible time of the
Turk. Finding their link to elsewhere is now my pet project. Yours appear to
link to the region of the Bodensee (Lake Constance- borders Austria, Germany
Switzerland).

The earliest US emigration from the Apetlon area was in the 1880's, so yours
was rather late for that region, but was in the period of greatest Burgenland
emigration. Your people probably left from Bremen or Hamburg. Most of these
north Burgenlanders settled in the midwest.There are 24 Pitzl's and 13 Thells
in the 1993/94 Burgenland phone book.

(From the Apetlon History as is the migration data) For the period 1790-1826,
there are 133 Thell and 118 Pitzl baptisms listed in the church records. For
1827-1851, 102 & 52 (my source only shows summary numbers, not the records
themselves). If you visit Apetlon or use LDS microfilm, you have your work
cut out for you! The LDS microfilm only covers Catholic church records from
1826-1896 and civil from 1896-1921. Some Thell marriages shown in the
history: 1 July 1827- Christianus Thell-Elysabetha Reinprecht; 19 July
1830-Gregorious Thell -Maria Trummer; 18 Feb. 1840-Michael Jandl-Maria Thell,
3 Feb. 1857-Georgious Tell (sic), colonus (farmer) son of Gregorii Tell and
Mariae Denk -and maria Graisy, daughter of Stephani Graisy, farmer and Evae
Michlits; 6 Feb.1888-the widower Christian Thell, born and living at number
276, Apetlon and the widow Maria Grundter, born Haider in Unterillmitz (Under
Illmitz), living in Apetlon No. 243.
(end of first section-continued as newsletter no.-38A)

END OF NEWSLETTER-EDITED & DISTRIBUTED BY GERALD J. BERGHOLD, Contact
for information about the Burgenland Bunch.

This thread: