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From: <>
Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 40 dtd 30 July 1998 (edited)
Date: Mon, 5 Jul 1999 07:58:13 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 40
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND GENEALOGY
(issued biweekly by )
July 30, 1998
(all rights reserved)

This section of a 3 section newsletter features the village of Stegersbach
and contains a Father Leser article on Stegersbach (section A features its
twin city Northampton, PA), as well as articles on Judaic Links and Names,
Some Burgenland Jewish Names, Where To Start When You Have No Data, Response
to Allentown Article and Steve Klucharich's Trip to Grossmrbich and Sulz.

BURGENLAND BUNCH AUSTRIAN EDITOR LEAVING FOR MILITARY SERVICE!
Albert Schuch, doctoral candidate at the University of Vienna, translator and
contributor of many newsletter articles and a special mentor to many, will
be leaving in the Fall for an eight month stint of Austrian military service.
(Austria is a neutral nation, but they do have a defense force. Austrian
males are required to serve a short period of military indoctrination after
which there can be an annual military obligation depending on length of
initial service.) As a result, Albert will not be available via email for a
short period, after which his BB activities will of necessity be limited
until he returns to civilian life. Since joining the BB, his research,
contributions and historical knowledge have added immeasurably to our
activity. We will miss his precise and professional expertise in matters
Burgenlndische. On a happier note, he has completed the Father Leser
village series for us as well as a few other feature articles which we will
be publishing while he is in the military. Our profound thanks for his
untiring work on our behalf and our best wishes for a rewarding and pleasant
"military sabbatical"! Albert sends the following message:

" My new address: <> My old address is valid until
September. ADVANCE NOTICE: I will not be able to read or write e-mail in
OCTOBER, due to military service. Maybe also for the first two weeks of
November. If I survive this 4 or 6 weeks, which I intend to do, I'll be back
on-line. Best regards, Albert Schuch"

CONTINUATION OF THE FATHER LESER SERIES (from Albert Schuch)
33 Stegersbach (H: Szentelek)-Sister City to Northampton, PA. Largest
community of the Gssing district (in 1930!), consisting of the core village
plus areas called Steinriegel, Schoada, Vorstadt, Hhnerzipf, Steinbach,
Bergler-Huser, Schinderische Huser, Graben and Zigeunerlager. Village name
first mentioned in 1289 ("Stegraifebach"). Stegersbach had a "Dreiigstamt"
(customs office; the "Dreissigst" was the 30th part of the value of the
goods). From the time of the Croatian settlement (16th century) until 1861
Stegersbach consisted of two separate communities, each with a "Richter" of
its own. In 1650, Michael WENSITS was Richter of Croatian Stegersbach, while
Thomas RATH was Richter of German Stegersbach. Population of German
Stegersbach in 1693: Richter: Hans SAUERZOPF; Geschworene: Hans KRAMMER, Hans
PITTERMANN, Mert ROTTN; families: ROTTN (4), FENDL (3) [note: probably should
read: PENDL], KRAMMER (2), FASCHING (2), JANOS (2), SAUERZOPF, IVANCSICS,
PIERHERR, LADNHOFFER, SCHUSTER, EKKNHAUER, PITTERMANN, FRELIG, LASINGER,
REIHLING, WAGNER, MERER; Sllner in the vineyards: KRASSL, FRONDL; Sllner in
the German vineyards ("Burgauer Bergen"): FAIGL, POSCH, BAUMGARTNER,
MILLHAUSER, RUSS, HIRSCHNECK, SEEDL, HERBST, TAUHER, KHOH, GASMUK, HESSL,
HIRSCHPECK; Sllner in "Neudauer Bergen": TRAGNIN, RUSS, HOANDL, SPANNER,
CSAR; Sllner in the "Bersi" or "Berti-Bergen": SUMMER, SCHALK (3), WOLFART,
TRAGNER, KAUFMANN, CERFUSS, HOFFNER, REICHHARDT, GASZNER (2), PIKKL, RING,
GAJTER, KAPPLER (2), ROART, GOGER, SCHWARTZ, NEUBAUER.

Croatian Stegersbach in 1693: Richter: Paul KRATICS; Geschworene: Vida
BARSICS, Mikola POPOFCSICS, Jure JAKOVICS; families: VUKOVITS (7), NOVAKOVICS
(3), BARSICS (2), CSENCZ (2), KATICS (2), MURLASICS (2), IFKOVITS (2),
DERKITS (2), KRENCZ, FABICS, POPOFCSICS, JAKSICS, BERKOVICS, RADMOVICS,
ZIDARICS. German Stegersbach in 1750: Richter: Hans WAGNER; Geschworene:
Michael GRAF, Lorenz WAGNER, Michael RATHEN, Matthias KERN; families: WAGNER
(3), KRAMMER (3), PITTERMANN (3), RATHEN (2), RATTEN (1), RATH (1), PRCKLER
(2), PRKKER (1), MARISICS (2), PEISCHL, MAINDLER, JANOS, KOLLOCS, FURCH,
PAULL, KERNHUSL, ZVITKOVICH; Sllner without farms: TRUIBER, CHRISTIANICS,
DORN, WEINGRLL, SCHABHTTL; Croatian Stegersbach in 1750: Richter: Michael
DERKITS; Geschworene: Miko ZWITKOVICH, Miko IFFKOVICH, Ive MARISICS, Ive
PIPLICS; families: IFFKOVICH (6), VUKOVICH (6), MURLASICH (6), DERKSIC (4),
NOVAKOVICH (3), PIPLICH (2), RADAKOVICH, BARSICH, MUSSICH, KATICS, FRIENICS,
FABSICS, POPOFCSICS, ZVITKOVICH, SIFERICH [note: probably should read
SIDERICH], WAGENHOFFER, ZWICKL; Sllner without farms: PAINB (?), MAINDLER,
DERKICS, PAULL, NOVAKOVICH, SCHINDL, FABSICS. The 1750 records only list the
subjects of Count BATTHYANY. At the same time, a part of German Stegersbach
belonged to Count SZECHENY, according to an Urbarium of 1756 namely the
following families: RATHEN (4), SAUERZOPF (2), KRAMMER (2), KATHFFER (2),
PEISCHL (3), TSCHAR (2), HOBEL (2), KERN (2), FUIK, GRAFF, KUNST,
BAUMGARTNER, TRETTNER, TUNST, JANOS; also a part of Croatian Stegersbach,
with the following families: NOVASEL (8), MURLASICS (7), DERKICS (6), GRAFF
(5), CZVITKOVICS (2), JUSICS (3), GANGL (2), IVANCSICS (2), SIDERICS (2),
IFFKOVICS (2), KAPESKY (2), MOLNAR, SCHREINER, KATICS, PRUDL, PENDL,
GRAFFICS, POPOFCSICS, MARINICS, RADAKOVICS.
The Croats especially owned many horses and worked as carters, they travelled
as far as Trieste and Fiume. Cholera (epidemic disease) in 1832. Amongst
other casualties, a whole family died out (Eva JUSITS died 9 Sep 1832, 68 y;
Anna JUSITS died 10 Sep 1832, 16 y; Theresia JUSITS died 12 Sep 1832, 18 y;
Florian JUSITS died 12 Sep 1832, 46 y). In 1849 80 inhabitants died of
Cholera from 8 July to 24 August. Stuhlrichter (szolgabiro) of Stegersbach
were Johann PHLPP (1862-68) and Franz LAKY (1869-71). Afterwards
Stegersbach was again part of the Stuhlrichteramt Gssing. Notaries: 1858-90
Matthias HOBEL, followed by Anton KOJTAR, Ernst KOTNICSKY, BORIK, and Adolf
RACZ. Post office since 1868, directed by Heinrich LEDERER, later by Anna
KAISER, then by Viktor KARDOS.

Leopold STRCK appears to have been the first physician in Stegersbach.
Births of his children can be found in the birth records 1852-56. Later
physicians: 1858 Dr. WALTER, ca. 1866 Andreas PFEIFFER, 1888 Dr. Alexander
GRUBER, later Dr. Stefan HALASZ, Dr. Sigmund SCHNBERGER, Dr. Koloman
SZENTPETERY, Dr. Bernard NEUMANN, in 1930 Dr. Josef STOPPER and Dr. Franz
FUCHS. First pharmacist of Stegersbach (since 1882) was Josef GANGL, followed
by Julius DOBO and Alois KOTTAS, in 1930 Eugenie KOTTAS, Alois' widow.

In 1874 the whole "German part" of Stegersbach (52 houses and the St.
Antonius chapel) burned down. The mill currently (1930) owned by Julius
TECHET. The gypsies' camp (lager) consists of 27 huts, inhabited by 37
families with 117 persons. Their surnames: SARKZI, HORVATH, GUSSAK can be
found in the church records of Stegersbach since 1770. Some of them always
were musicians. They are totally ignorant of religious education.
[translator's note: one night during WW II the gypsies' camp was surrounded
by police and/or military, the inhabitants brought into concentration camps.
Very few returned.]

The local BATTHYANY estate was - like in Rauchwart - sold to Comtess Theodora
KOTTULINSKY in 1892 (from Prince Alfred de MONTENUOVO, son of Prince Wilhelm
de MONTENUOVO and Comtess Juliane BATTHYANY). The Stegersbach estate was also
subsequently sold to the same Budapest bank. The bank sold the land to local
farmers in small pieces. Inhabitants: 1503 (1499 Catholics + 4 Lutherans) in
1812, 1849 (1844 C + 5 L) in 1832, 2573 (2542 of them Catholics) in 1930 (in
476 houses). Ca. 600 Stegersbach natives living in America in 1930. Ca. 100
casualties in WW I.

In 1624 Stegersbach had had a Lutheran pastor (Georg WERNER). Catholic
priests: Peter SZENTELEKY (1698), KUSELI (1753), Peter GROSZ (1757), Paul
PUNTZ (1758-63), Georg BUKLETICS (1763-88), Josef KLEMENT (1788-1813, born in
St. Michael), Georg TEKLITS (1813-46), Josef VARGA (1846-70), Franz SCHWARZ
(1870-99), Stefan OSZTOVITS (1899-1906), Karl BRAUN (1906-).

Teachers: Michael CVITKOVICS (1698), Stefan KLUPAITZ (1757), Johann GROFF
(GRAF; died 1771), Karl NEMLOVIL (died 1790), Georg RIEDL (1796), Johann
ENGER (1801-08, from Gerersdorf), Mathias SVETICS (1809-12, from Rehgraben,
helped by son Johann), Matthias MAYERHOFFER (1812-17), Kaspar MAYERHOFFER
(1817-23), Josef BUTKOVITS (1832), Johann WEHOFSITS (1837-85), Johann KNOR
(1885-1908), Rudolf FUMITS (1908-17), Alexander LUIF (1917-). The teachers
als served as notaries until 1858. In 1930 Alexander LUIF was head teacher,
the 2nd to 5th teachers were Andreas MEDEK, Josef SCHARNAGL, Stefan STIPSITS,
Karl SCHNEIDER and Margarete HOCHLEITNER MOSER. Known earlier 2nd (etc.)
teachers: Johann JANISCH (1862), Karl KAISER sr. (1864-74), Karl KAISER jr.
(1884-1906). A secondary school was established in 1918, teachers in 1930:
Josef BLOHMANN, Josef HOCHLEITNER, Hans LEIERER, Elisabeth SCHARNAGEL (nee
SCHUMMEL). (source: V+H Nr. 4-8/1958)

POSSIBLE JEWISH LINKS AND JEWISH NAMES (from Maureen Tighe-Brown)
(Ed.-one of our contacts has no information concerning his grandfather other
than that he emigrated from Austria and had the name of a Burgenland village
-Hornstein. There is also a possibility that the name stems from the family
who had the "Herrschaft". Another had a grandfather who changed his name upon
entering the US and left no trace of his former name. Although in both cases
there is no actual proof as to Jewish ancestors, this possibility also exists
as indicated by some other facts. We know of cases where some individuals,
unhappy with assigned Germanic names, may have changed them upon emigrating.
I asked our expert on Judaic matters to comment.)

'Jewish' names: As you may know, until about 1781 in the Habsburg Empire,
Jews took the name of their father with 'bar' for male children and 'ben' for
female children to denote the relationship, e.g., David bar Saloman, Esther
ben Saloman. Around 1780-1, Joseph II stipulated that Habsburg Jews must
adopt a family name that would continue from generation to generation. I
believe the name was required to be Germanic. This requirement for Jews to
take a surname followed later for other parts of East Central and Eastern
Europe, although Germanic surnames were not required. Therefore, I would
guess that a Germanic surname suggests origins in the Habsburg Empire, at
least that a Habsburg Empire male entered into the family lineage. However,
as I am finding in my Deutschkreutz records, there was always (i.e., from
1683 for Roman Catholics, from 1833 for Jews, according to the records I have
available) a significant amount of intermarriage, and surnames that are
Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, and Polish enter the records in that way. In
addition, it is clear from the marriage and burial records that people born
in Deutschkreutz frequently leave for other places, often in the vicinity
since their remains are later buried in Deutschkreutz.
I think Hornstein's best bet is to get hold of the Kis-Marton (Eisenstadt)
records and identify his family members; in that way, he can look for their
relocation to or from other places. Unfortunately, the pre-1830s' records
had to be sent to Berlin during WWII, and apparently were destroyed there.

Feel free to suggest that your contact e-mail me if he needs further
assistance or ideas, since it takes some time for me to input a new address,
and it would help if I heard directly from him. Also, Rabbi Marmorstein, as
well as Peter Gieler and Martin Perl (BB members), will be excellent
references for him. I would also suggest he join the Jewishgen H-Sig, since
the Jewish records have their own unique problems, apart from the Christian
materials. The H-Siggers would be immensely helpful to him. Maureen.

SOME SOUTHERN BURGENLAND JEWISH NAMES (from Albert Schuch)
In BB newsletter # 28 Gert Tschgl () published a list of
Jewish families once living in Oberwart (as a reminder, the surnames were:
"FISCHER; GLASER; FRISCHMANN; GRNWALD; KOHN (KVES or KOEVES); KORNFEIN;
LWY (LOEWY); SCHLENGER; WEIGL; ANGELUS; WRZBURGER (WUERZBURGER); FIEGLER;
FROMMER; HEINRICH; KONSTANTIN; WEISS (WEISZ).") In addition to this list,
here are some (not all!) names of Jewish families who lived, had families or
owned businesses in Southern Burgenland communities between 1920-1938:
Oberwart (in addition to the above): EBENSPANGER, MEDOWY, NADAI, BLAU,
ROSENBERGER, HOCHFELDER, probably also SCHEIN, SCHWARZ and ULLMANN;
Bernstein: ANGELUS, AWIN; Stadt-Schlaining: LWY, EBENSPANGER, WOLF,
WRZBURGER, LWENSOHN, EISENSTDTER, HEINRICH, STERN, DEUTSCH; Rechnitz:
WEISZ, GNSBERGER, GRANER, SCHNWALD, HOLZER, MAYER, HIRSCHL, SPIEGEL,
SPIEGLER, STERN, ENGEL, AWIN, BLAU, FRANKL, SCHREINER, SPIELMANN, GRNBERGER,
SPITZER, MARGARETHEN, STEINER; GRNFELD, KERTESZ, BLUMSCHEIN, EISENSTDTER,
WRZBURGER, GLCK, HEUBERGER; Gropetersdorf: MANDL, FLEISCHNER, LWY,
HEINRICH, SCHEY, MAYER, WALLSTEIN, STERN, HEINISCH, KOPFSTEIN, HALAUNBRENNER;
Pinkafeld: BSCHITZ, BARUCH, HOLZER, RUBINSTEIN, ANDAUER;
Bad Tatzmannsdorf: HEINRICH, STERN; Schachendorf: UNGER; Neuberg: ZUCKERMANN;
Kukmirn: WURMFELD; Eberau: LWY;
Gssing: ALEXANDER, ENDRENYI-ENGEL, FALUDY (FEIGELSTOCK), FARKAS, FREUND,
FERT,GRNFELD, HEUBERGER, KLEIN, LATZER, LNDLER, MAYER, MOSKOVITS, PINTER,
POLLAK, RECHNITZER, ROTHBERG, ROTHSTEIN, STEINER, WEILER, ROSENZWEIG; St.
Michael: SCHLESINGER, WRZBURGER; Stegersbach: WRZBURGER; Lockenhaus: SZSZ;
Punitz: HOLZER; Hodis: HOLZER, SPITZER; Rauchwart: HIRSCH.
Source is the Oberwarther Sonntags-Zeitung (1923-38), for Gssing the book
"Der "Bla von Gssing" aus dem Burgenland (sterreich) erzhlt seine
70jhrige Lebensgeschichte (1918-1988)", an autobiography of Berth (Adalbert)
Berth ROTHSTEIN, published in 1988 by Verlag Hans-Alfred HERCHEN & Co.,
Fichardstr. 30, D-6000 Frankfurt am Main 1 (Germany), ISBN 3-89184-052-7, 255
pages. (Berth ROTHSTEIN, born 1918 in Gssing, managed to escape to Italy in
1938, from there to Sweden in 1939, his 6 brothers and sisters also survived
the Holocaust, whereas their parents died in Litzmannstadt (Lodz) or
Auschwitz.)

ANOTHER TOUGH PROBLEM AND WHERE DO YOU START?
One correspondent writes:
<< I would like to join. Kenneth E Boner, 2 West Beach Rd., Dunkirk, New
York 14048 E-mail Continue to trace my Grandfather John
Boner entered this country at the age of 14 alone, from Austria born in
Austria 1874, first known place he resided was Ford City, Pa. >>
ANSWER: Nice to hear from you. Your message was also forwarded by one of our
members. You do have a genealogical problem, maybe we can help. We're
involved with the Burgenland of Austria and is there any clue that leads you
to believe your grandfather emigrated from there? The Austro/Hungarian Empire
was vast stretching from northern Italy to Russia and from Poland to Greece.
Your ancestor could have come from anywhere and still have come from Austria.
What religion was he, what language(s) did he speak at home (not what
languages he knew). Did he ever mention any Austrian town, village, river,
etc. Without any of this data you haven't a chance of finding his origins.
You can try the New York ship listings for 1888 (assuming he came through the
port of New York-at age 14 he may not even have been listed if he was with
someone else), but it means a lot of searching. There may an index but again
what name would he be listed under? Do you know the port of embarkation
(Hamburg, Bremen, Antwerp, Trieste? Again there are indices for some of these
ports for certain years. The name Boner is not a Burgenland name known to me
and I even doudt if it is Germanic, although it could be a phonetic spelling
of something like Bhmer, Boehmer (Bohemian) or Bohner (bean dealer-don't
laugh, a very common name), or Bonner (an inhabitant of the city of Bonn) or
even a corruption of Behm (a Burgenland name).

Have you checked for a naturalization record which would give the country of
origin and maybe the town or village? It would be in the courthouse of the
county in which he resided when he applied for citizenship. THIS MAY BE YOUR
BEST BET!

As you can see, we must find the end of a genealogical piece of string before
you can even hope to trace origins. Be glad to help in any way I can and
maybe get you started or unstuck in your research. It wouldn't help to join
our group if your grandfather was not from the Burgenland, because you'd
never get a contact. People here are looking for Burgenland names or families
from Burgenland villages (over 400). We have to establish some point of
origin first. Regards, Gerry Berghold

RESPONSE TO ALLENTOWN ARTICLE (Newsletter 38) -AND A REPORT OF A RECENT TRIP
TO THE VILLAGES OF GROSSMURBISCH & SULZ (from member Steve Klucharich)

Hi Gerry, The long article about Allentown was great. it brought back a lot
of memories. My grandparents owned a store on 4th and Gordon Sts. (my
grandfather and uncles also owned a bakery on Union Blvd.), my mother was
born and raised there and I lived on Gordon St. until I left for college in
the early 70's. I was baptized in Sacred Heart Church and attended both
Sacred Heart School and Central Catholic HS. We used to play behind both
schools as kids. Sacred Heart Church in the late 50's and early 60's was
still very much a "German" church. I don't remember any services in German,
but I do remember, as an altar boy (!), hearing a lot of German prayers and
conversations in German by the older parishoners after the Mass. I was told
stories about rivalries, fights and raids of churches between Sared Heart
parishoners and Immaculate Conception parishoners in the despised 2nd Ward
(even though the Sangerbund Society was only a block and half from the
Immaculate Conception church).

When I was growing up, the last of the original Burgenlnd immigrants in the
neighborhood were in the later years of their lives. I can remember talking
to and barely understanding the responses of a lot of the older men and
women in the neighborhood. My grandmother came to the US in 1902 or 1903,
died at 90 in 1975 and she spoke a very broken and heavily accented English!
The Burgenland dialect was pretty much a main language in the neighborhood
for that generation.

Burgenland Trip
I'm also just back from Burgenland. I presently live in the area of
Wiesbaden, Germany. Wiesbaden is in the western part of Germany, in the
state of Hesse ( this is the State where the German mercenaries during the
Revolutionary War were from. Perhaps the descendents of my neighbors were
held prisoner at Jordan and Gordon Sts ! ). The drive to Graz lasted about 7
hrs, and is approximately 750km. It's about another 45 minutes and 90 KM to
Gussing. I went not so much with a geneological fervor, but more of a
curiousity to find what kind of place my grandparents came from. My father's
parents emmigrated from Gro"ssmurbish (father) and Deutsch Ehrensdorf
(mother). My mother's parents were from Steingraben (father) and Sulz
(mother).

I have a tourist map of Burgenland. From this map, it looks like Steingraben
and Sulz are about 2 km apart. In reality, one can walk from one to the
other in about 10 minutes. Steingraben sits on a small hill, with a great
view of the Burg in Gu"ssing. It's a collection of houses and small farm
Hofs, surrounded by fields. It has a small Gasthaus. I went into the
Gasthaus, ordered a beer ( it was a very warm day, 28 C). I asked the young
man pouring the beer for directions to the Friedhof and told him that my
grandfather had come from this Dorf. I told him that his name was Billovits
(although he spelled it Billowitch). He said that there were a lot of
Billovits here and asked if i knew the house number. I didn't know the house
number. He said that the former owner of the Gasthaus was a Billovits and
that she lived next door. He telephoned her and I went next door. We met
and talked for a little while before determining that we are from different
families (Verwandschaft). Frau Kanapes was determined to find someone
related to me. After calling most of the Billovits' in Steingraben, she got
a lead. We went to Number 34, the home of Franz Billovits, his wife Margeret
and her sister in law Teresia Kolsitch. Franz turns out to by my 3rd cousin.
His grandfather and my great grandfather were brothers. My great-
grandfather had 3 sons, Andreas, Johann and Franz. All three came to
America. Andreas returned to Burgenland and is buried in Steingraben.
Johann ( John, my mother's uncle) lived in New York, where he owned a
restaurant. Franz ( Frank, my grandfather ) settled in Allentown. Franz is
a farmer (Bauer) and a jovial and friendly man in his 60's. His wife
Margeret was born in Nazareth, PA and returned with her parents when she was
six months old. I jokingly asked her why she didn't remember how to speak
English. Teresia was the historian, knowing who married whom, when they died,
where they went in the States. Her sister went to and is still living in
Nazareth Teresia had visited her there 3 times. It turns out that her sister
and her sister's husband were good friends with one of my aunts and her
husband. We had a nice visit. The conversation was a little strained at
times, though. The Burgenland dialect is quite a challange to understand .
But everyone was tolerant of my "hoch Deutsch" and we managed to communicate
with each other.

The next day, I went to Gro"ssmurbish. Again, I thought the drive would be
longer than it turned out to be. Gro"ssmurbish is about 11 km from the
center of Gu"ssing. This would put it about 15 km from Sulz & Steingraben.
I had a house number for our Klucsatits Verwandshaft. My cousin Kathy had
done research at the LDS and had found a house number from about 4
generations back. I stopped a man on the street and inquired about the house
number. He told me that Frau Eberhard lives there and that her mother is a
Klucsarits. He took me into the Gasthaus Wukovits and introduced me to her.
It turns out that her mother and my father are cousins. Frau Eberhard was
at a table with 8 other women, all of whom had a relative who at one time or
another lived in Coplay or Northhampton. It was a fun and very animated
conversation. Frau Eberhard took me to meet her mother, a woman in her
80's. She was happy to meet family. I unfortunately had to return to
Germany that day. We exchanged addresses and Frau Eberhard invited me back
to look at old photos. It was quite the enjoyable adventure.

I was taken by the similarity in landscape of Burgenland to the Lehigh
Valley. The area around Gu"ssing could be Egypt, Whitehall, Limeport or
East Milford Township in the Lehigh Valley ( minus the Burg, of course).
Also, after 25 years of living away from Allentown, it was refreshing to have
people not regard my family name(s) as strange. I spent a night in
Heiligenkreuz, at the Gasthof Gibiser ( a very nice place, by the way). When
I checked in, Frau Gibiser asked my name. When I responded with Klucharich,
she responded, "That's a good Burgenlandish name!". I regret not having
enough time to find out about my mother's mother's family, Muik, in Sulz.
There was nobody on the streets in Sulz and the young lady tending the store
wasn't very interested in helping me( it was a very warm day and I think she
just wanted to be somewhere else). And I have a question to pose. Do you or
anyone else know what the large building is across from the water bottling
plant in Sulz. Was it some sort of Bad? It appeared abandoned. I
unfortunately didn't have the time to find out. Perhaps next time.

I'd like to thank all of you for your efforts and hard work for putting the
BB news letters out. In the last 6 months, I don't get on the internet as
often as I used to. We haven't found a provider here yet with a local
number. Und Deutsche Telekom ist sehr teuer !!! So I don't get to the web
site much. Keep up the good work !!
(newsletter continued as no.-40A)

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