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Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 44 dtd 30 Sept 1998 (edited)
Date: Tue, 6 Jul 1999 08:28:19 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS No. -44
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND GENEALOGY
(issued biweekly by )
September 30, 1998
(all rights reserved)

"No man is responsible for his father. That is entirely his mother's affair."
-Margaret Trumbull, Alabaster Lamps

This first section of the 3 section newsletter features the villages of
Neudauberg and Burgauberg, Translations of Latin Terms, Immigrant Language as
a Clue, Lost Village of Gschorrholz, More Terms, Burgenland Districts
(Bezirk) and Email Message from Heinz Koller in Gssing.

***NOTICE***NOTICE***
THERE WILL BE NO NEWSLETTER PUBLISHED OCTOBER 15
THE NEXT EDITION WILL BE DATED OCTOBER 31
THE BURGENLAND BUNCH OFFICE IS CLOSING FOR A LITTLE REST
Our circulation is now 222!
STAFF MEMBER NEWS
Ernest Chrisbacher; (), has agreed to join the
Burgenland Bunch staff as a contributing editor. His specialty will be
western Hungarian border villages, particularly in the Bakony region
immediately east of the Burgenland. Ernest is preparing a data base of
German-Hungarian families and villages in the Bakony area.

Albert Schuch; Burgenland Editor, will not be able to receive email or answer
questions until further notice. Albert entered Austrian military service on
September 28 for 8 months of duty. He has our best wishes and we hope for a
speedy return to our staff. The good news is that Albert completed the Father
Leser Village Translations and they will continue to be featured in the
newsletter.

BURGENLAND VILLAGES (the Father Leser series, translated by Albert Schuch-may
be the earliest Burgenland document which shows your family name)
38) Neudauberg
South of Hackerberg. Always belonged to the Gssing domain, but to Neudau
(Styria) parish. The Urbar of 1693 for Neudauberg ("a Najgoj Hegyben") names:
TRAGNER, KAPFER, GASSNER, SCHALK (2 each), RUS, HOANDL, SPANNER, CSAR (1
each). For the "Bers Berg" area: SUMMER, BOLFART, KAUFMANN, CERFUSZ,
HAOFFNER, REICHHART, PIKKL, RING, PAJTER, ROART, POGER, SCHWARZ, NEUBAUER (1
each).

The Urbar of 1732 names the following "Neudauer-Bergholden"-families (i.e.
Sllner-families in the Neudau hills): POHLMLLEN (3), GOTTHARD, RESCH,
LASCHALT (2 each), RUISZ, BUMHALTER, GLATZ, PAUER, HABERSACK, KLAR, KNECHTL,
GOGER, FREYTAG, FRENZ, KUROKISCH, JANOSCH, HAMMER, CSAR, HALPER, SCHTTL,
WINKLER, PUIKL, GNOSER, FELKISCH, PFEIFER, TAUCHER. In 1750: GURTHET (3),
FREYTAG, POHLMLLNER, GOGER (2 each), SCHALK, PFEIFFER, FELKISCH, SCHUTZL,
GRLL, RATH, PROMISLER, HERBST, GRUMHOLZER, REYSMUTH, CSAR, HABERSACK,
BAUMGARTNER, WOLF, FUX, REICHL, HAMMER, KNECHTL, LASCHALT, PUIKL, TAUCHER,
BREINER, GARTNER, RESCH, HARMANN, LUIFF, GLATZ.

Has a school since 1878, built by the Hungarian government. [Note: Obviously
the government didn't like to see Hungarian pupils attending Styrian (in this
case: Neudau) schools.] Teachers: Georg KUNTSCH (1878-1913), Alexander GRAF
(1913-1918; lost his job because he supported the Communists in 1918), Julius
NEMETH (1918-19), Artur ZANYI (1920-21), Josef SCHWEIFER (1922), Adolf
WERTSCH (1924-), second teacher Elise POFSCHEK since 1929.
(source: V+H Nr. 12/1958)

39) Burgauberg
Many inhabitants have ancestors in Burgau, Burgauberg is also a part of the
parish Burgau (Styria!). In 1644 Michael GRISLER, administrator of the domain
Burgau, receives three vineyards in Burgauberg to cover a debt from the times
of the Turkish wars. Owners of neigbouring vineyards are: Hans SAMER, Peter
LANGHEIMBER, Andreas SIX, Rieperl SCHITLER, Georg GRUBER and Count Maximilian
HERBERSTEIN. The Gssing Urbarium of 1750 names as "Burgauer Bergholden"
living "auf der Hungerischen Seiten in dem Weingebirg" (= small-holders from
Burgau, living on the Hungarian side [of the border, i.e. of the river
Lafnitz]
in the vineyard hills) the following families: VEIGL (3), PRUNNER (3), SODL,
HIRSCHBK, PESSINGER, RUESZ, WAGNER, PFINGSTL, SCHWARZ, PROSCH (2 each),
FRHLICH, TOMPF, NEUBAUER, HOECKL, MUIK, PUIKL, HNDLER, PAUER, STRK,
ZOTTER, LOIPERSBCK, RABER, PFSTER, PLTZL, SCHABHTL, REITHER, KRAMMER,
REISSENHOFER, LUKICS, HAISLER, RATHMANN, LAMPL, LAMMINGER, SCHUSTER, SCHTZL,
WIPPERL (1 each). These 49 families own 46 houses, 27 oxen, 55 cows, etc.,
and the Urbarium says about them: "These Styrian "Bergler" (= people living
on the hills) have acquired property with the permission of the Count
Batthyany, they have come over from the Styrian side [of the border] from
time to time. Their number is at times higher and at times lower. They own
nothing except for a few vineyards and fields."
Number of inhabitants: 1870: 606; 1930: 772 (in 123 houses). Part of Burgau
parish. Two chapels. Teachers: Franz SCHLEGEL (1870-1911), Julius NEMETH
(1911-14), Flora CHAKANY nee PECZLY (1914-21), Robert HOLPER (1921-29),
Andreas MEDEK (1929-), second teacher Mathilde SEELIG (1923-). (source: V+H
Nr. 12/1958)

TRANSLATIONS OF LATIN TERMS APPEARING IN BURGENLAND RECORDS
(email from Anna Kresh, Albert Schuch, Fritz Knigshofer)
Ed. Note:-Latin was the official language of Hungary for centuries.
Definitions may differ from those found elsewhere. It would be well to make a
list of what is printed here if occupations are part of your genealogies.
Anna writes: Here are several occupations I found in the Nemet Csencs
(Deutsch Tschantschendorf) Hungarian church records. I'm including the
gender of the persons listed. I have also added the translation as found in
my Latin/English dictionary. Can you add anything more to these? I am aware
the 'us' endings are masculine, and the 'a' endings are feminine. What
translations would be applicable for Vas Megye during the 1800s?

OCCUPATIONS:
ancilla (f) - maid servant ; carnifex (m) - executioner, hangman ; famulus
(m) - servant, famula (f) - handmaid; figulus (m) - potter; ludimagister
(m,f) (ludimag., ludim.) - no translation found; molitor (m) - builder;
molitorifsa or molitorissa? (f) - Maybe the 'fsa' should be 'ssa', but it
sure looks like an 'f'; praefectus horrei (m) - overseer/superintendant of
barn, granary, storehouse?

NAME OF CHILD:
proles mortua - could this be "stillbirth"? It's usually listed in the
column for 'name of child'. In many cases the names of the Godparents are
missing. Is there any differentiation between a stillbirth and a child who
lives for just a short time? Under what circumstances would there be no
Godparents?

Waldburgus (m), Waldburga (f) - name of a child - for example: Theresia
Waldburga, although most of the time Waldburgus/a is used alone without any
other given first name. The child is always illegitimate. I have not found
this name given to a legitimate child. Never heard of this name and can't
find anything on it.

LOCATION:
Prom. - I also am finding the abbreviation Prom. preceding the birthplace (or
residence) of the parents, for example: "Prom. Nemet Csencs N. 4". I
understand that this means they lived at house number 4 in Deutsch
Tschantschendorf, but what does the Prom. mean? All I can find in the Latin
dictionary that might fit is Promontorium (a mountain ridge).

Albert replies:following are some comments on your Latin terms: > ancilla (f)
- maid servant> famula (f) - handmaid. These are very similar. Both can be
translated as "Magd" (maid) into German. If there is a difference, then I
think it will be the following: The "ancilla" might have worked on the farm
most of the time, whereas the "famula" might have worked in the house most of
the time.
> carnifex (m) - executioner, hangman; more likely: knacker (called
"Schinder" or "Abdecker" in German; removes dead animals for their hides,
bones, etc.)
> famulus (m) - servant; > figulus (m) - potter-nothing to add on these two;
correct translations
> ludimagister (m,f) (ludimag., ludim.) = teacher
> molitor (m) - builder-more likely: miller
> molitorifsa or molitorissa? (f) - Maybe the 'fsa' should be 'ssa', but > it
sure looks like an 'f', the correct female version of molitor would be
"molitrix"; but I think if it reads "molitorissa" it will still mean
"miller's wife"
> praefectus horrei (m) - overseer/superintendant of barn, granary, most
likely: granary overseer or storehouse overseer

> NAME OF CHILD:
> proles mortua - could this be "stillbirth"? -yes, it is "stillbirth"

> LOCATION:
> Prom. - I also am finding the abbreviation Prom. preceding the birthplace
(or residence) of the parents, -most likely this is correct; the Latin
"Promontorium" seems to be the equivalent to the German "Bergen"

(ED. note:Fritz is in Europe on a business trip but finds time and
opportunity to check his email)

Fritz writes:Let me send this message to you via replying to Albert's very
good comments. Greetings to all of you. I am in Almaty, Kazakhstan where
for a few precious days I have access to my e-mail. Unfortunately, I'll be
without access once again all of next week, when work will take me to Astana,
the capital of Kazakhstan (the former Zelinograd) in the north of the
country. Unexpectedly, I might have to go to Budapest for a day or so, before
returning to Washington on the 20th or 21st of this month. The
communications with you fellow bbunch members and friends, and the
newsletter, were the most cherished things in my mail.

On "carnifex" Albert's explanation of "Schinder" makes very good sense. I
had thought of butcher, but this is normally given in Latin as "lanio." It
would be unlikely that a small village like Deutsch Tschantschendorf had a
hangman.

The ending -fex indicates somebody who manufactures something, typically a
member of a trade. For instance, panifex is a baker (bread maker), and
artifex a general term used to describe a member of the trades, a craftsman.

"Molitorissa" might well have been used to describe the widow of a flour
miller, because as long as the husband lived, the family status was usually
entered after the man (i.e., molitor). Since Latin and German show the
female form in the ending of the word, a small ambiguity gets introduced,
because the female ending can indicate a carrier of the profession, or the
wife or widow of a man who is the carrier.

A widow after (or the wife of) the village teacher was usually described as
ludi magistra. Other terms used to describe the teacher were ludi rector, or
docens. For young teachers, I believe the term "praeceptor" was used, also
docens. I am not completely sure as I have to work from memory.

In my search, I found that stillbirths usually had no godparents. The same
could happen to some children who died very soon after birth. Perhaps the
name used for illegitimate girls in N.Csenc was Walburga, also spelled
Waldburga or Walpurga. This is a relatively rare female name.
Interestingly, this summer a far away relative in Graz suggested to me that
some catholic parish priests had the habit (in former times) of insisting to
provide the name for illegitimate children, in order to stigmatize them
(make everyone realize for life that the person had been illegitimate). Some
priests often insisted that the child be baptized in the name of the saint
whose nameday was on or near the day of the child's birth. This then
produced names such as Dominik, or Pankratz. I wonder whether the priest of
N. Csenc might have used the name Walburga to mark girls born out of wedlock.

I fully agree with the interpretation of promontorium as "Bergen." Another
such term was praedium, often abbreviated as P. before the name of the
location. This then described a Maierhof (manorial farm) of the village.
The Latin word for the overseer of such a farm was usually spanus or spanus
dominalis, in Hungarian ispan or major gazda.

Later: Last Saturday, I had a few hours in the Szechny Library in Budapest
and used the opportunity to check the Latin dictionaries in the reference
section there. These are what I found:

[1] "Glossarium Mediae et Infimae Latinitatis Regni Hungariae" (glossary of
middle and earlier (?) Latin in the kingdom of Hungary), by Anton Bartal
(Ed.), Teubner, Leipzig, 1901.

[2 "Lexicon Latinitatis Medii Aevi Hungariae" (lexicon of middle-ages Latin
in Hungary), by Jnos Harmatta and Ivn Bornkai (Eds.), Akadmi ai Kiad,
Budapest, 1987 and following. This is in several volumes, of which the issues
up to the letter H have been published so far.

[3] "Glossarium Vocum in Politicis ac Juridicis negotiis" (glossary of [the
language] spoken in political and legal affairs), by Antal Szirmai, Cassova
(Kosice?), 1801.

[4] "Dictionarium Latino-Hungaricum et Hungarico-Latino- Germanicum," by
Priz Ferenc Ppai, Budapest, 1995.

[5] "A Latin nyelv Sztra" (dictionary of Latin language), by Dr. Henrik
Finly, Budapest, 1884.

What do these books say about carnifex? Number [1] defines the word as
"lanius qui carnes vendit et facit" (butcher who sells and produces meat).
The Hungarian equivalents are given as mszros and hentes, German
"Fleischer," i.e., butcher in English. No other meanings are provided.
Number [2] states the meanings as follows: (1) bak, hhr, kinvallat;
meaning hangman, executioner, or torturer; (2) hhrlelk, gyilkos; which I
translate as "execution-style murderer"; and (3) mszros, hentes; which we
already had as meaning butcher. Numbers [3] to [5] translate the word only
into the meaning of hangman or executioner, with the Hungarian words hhr,
hengr, brtn (prison-ward), and bak.

As you can see, we have no clear answer from these Latin dictionaries!
Interestingly, the Latin word lanius translates to executioner as well,
besides the (more common?) meaning of butcher. I think it still remains most
likely that the term in the records of Nemet Csencs referred to the meaning
of butcher or perhaps knacker/flayer as Albert has suggested. If you can
follow the related person into one of the periods where the Hungarian
language was used for entries, then you might find the pastor's Hungarian
equivalent for his use of carnifex in Latin.

IMMIGRANT LANGUAGE AS A CLUE TO ORIGIN (Gerry Berghold)
While stuck in the mid 1600's as far as expanding my own genealogy is
concerned, I continue to persue subjects that may aid the search. Recently
I've been reading "In Search of the Indo-Europeans", J. P. Malloy, Thames &
Hudson Publisher, 1997. Tracing the origins of each of the Indo-European
peoples of Europe and Asia from both neolithic and eneolithic periods and
using current archaeological and linguistic evidence, it is a fascinating
story. A "prehistoric genealogy" as it were. A modern scientific appraisal of
what used to be considered the migrations of the descendants of Noah's sons,
Shem, Ham and Japhet. A point made by the author suggested this article.
Paraphrasing his remarks slightly. "Languages upon the point of extinction
are normally carried to the grave by the older members of the community when
the younger members have failed to learn it. This process can happen within
three generations. An immigrant family in (the United States), may speak
exclusively (German) while their children become bilingual. They in turn
decide to raise their children exlusively in English. Within three
generations grandparent and grandchild can no longer communicate."

This applies to our research in two distinct areas. Since we have three major
language groupings in the Burgenland (i.e. German, Croatian, Hungarian plus
perhaps some Romany and Yiddish) we must always consider what language our
individual immigrant ancestors used in the early days of their emigration.
Why waste time looking in exclusively German villages for ancestors who spoke
Croatian or Hungarian full time or vice versa? If we don't know what language
they spoke, we may find some documents or perhaps the US Census may tell us
(1910 and 1920 carry this data). We can then look in which villages the
particular language was spoken. We can find information in the LDS holdings
as LDS microfiche 6001476 "Topographical Lexicon of The Communities of
Hungary Compiled Officially in 1773". Our area is mostly covered in the
section under "Comitatus Castriferrei" (an older name for Vas Megye).
Villages are listed under Latin, Hungarian, German and Croatian (Slavonica)
name, by parish. Chief religion and principle language is then shown. While
many of us know the primary villages of our ancestors, the above may also
help in locating others.

One could say that this isn't very helpful given that 85% of Burgenlanders
are German. However even here one can differentiate between those who spoke
(speak) Hianzisch and those who didn't.The former are probably from the
southern half of Burgenland. Likewise there is a group in the Bakony Hills of
Hungary (see previous newsletters) who speak something similar. Hianzisch is
a softer language, slurred a little like a US southern accent and full of
strange words and "o", and "oa" endings. To us, if it looks or sounds like
German but differs from what we learn in US schools, it's probably Hianzisch.

The second area of relevance involves pre Burgenland place of origin. Here
also, language can play a part. I wouldn't look in Bavaria or Styria for
ancestors who spoke Croatian or Hungarian. Even in the germanic lands there
is a possibility that the dialects spoken in Burgenland (like Hianzisch) may
point to particular regions in the germanic or slavic lands. In other words,
narrow the choices. Language within the framework of general family grouping
is a clue to origin just like culture, music, food and folktales. Think about
it as you search for that elusive village.

LOST VILLAGE-GSCHORRHOLZ & SOME MORE TERMINOLOGY
Ed. Note: There are villages whose names no longer appear as post offices or
in phone books. These villages for the most part have been absorbed by
others. Their names may still designate an area within the absorbing village.
Here is one that gave us some trouble:

Part of e-mail sent to Roman Weber by Albert Schuch. "Until you wrote that
Gschorholz was also part of Pilgersdorf parish, Hap (Anderson) and others
thought maybe it was Kirchschlag parish. G. Berghold didn't know ...Until
very recently, I also had no idea. This is how I found out: In an antiquarian
bookshop I bought an "Ortsverzeichnis fr Burgenland" as was used by the
Austrian disability insurance company. It was compiled at a time when all of
their payments went through the local post offices. It includes even the
smallest of small settlements and gives the information to which post office
it belonged. Once I know the post office, I know the Gemeinde (community). By
the way, in this book Gschorholz is spelled GSCHORRHOLZ, with two "r's". It
seems that today the name Gschorholz is no longer used. This area is now just
a part of Pilgersdorf.

Some More Terminolgy
>Leser refers to "Rottgrnde" as compared to village "Sessionsgrnde"<
For Fritz (& other "Terminology Bunch" members), You are definitely on the
right track this time. The "Rottgrnde" are areas cleared of wood and turned
into farming land. I think that at the time the Urbarium was set up (in the
1760's) these were still forests owned by the domain.The word "Anger" as I
know it refers to an area inside the village, usually in the center.

> A term I don't recall from the Burgenland, but certainly used a lot in
neighboring Styria is "Leiten," typically meaning a pasture on the side
(slope) of a mountain or hill. < This term is used in the Western parts of
Southern Burgenland (i.e. at the or close to the Styrian border). For
example, my Stegersbach ancestors lived in an area called "Leitenwald".

BURGENLAND DISTRICTS (BEZIRK) by Gerry Berghold
You should be aware of the Bezirk to which your villages belong. Various
types of records may be found there. When visiting Burgenland villages, be
sure to also visit the Bezirk if for nothing more than historical
association. Many immigrants often refered to the Bezirk as there place of
origin. I have seen US census records which gave the district as place of
foreign origin. I always furnish new members with the name of the their
village district. There are now seven Bezirks (Districts) Which Comprise
Burgenland (North to South): Neuseidl, Eisenstadt, Mattersburg,
Oberpullendorf, Oberwart, Gssing, and Jennersdorf.

The Hungarian or pre 1921 districts also included the above (excluding
Jennersdsorf) plus: Ungarisch Altenburg (Magyarovar), Ragendorf (Mosonrajka),
denburg (Sopron), Gns (Kszeg), Steinamanger (Szombathely), Krmend and
Szentgotthard.

Within these districts are many Gemeinden (communities) which may include a
single village or a group of villages. Gemeinden may be further identified as
Freistadt (free cities) Marktgemeinden (market or business communities) or
Katastralgemeinden (land record communities). Political structure may
continue change as villages develop or combine or share their admisistrative
functions.

You may find also find references to the Hungarian counties (Megye) from
which Burgenland was formed -Vas (Komitat Eisenberg, earlier Comitatus
Castriferrei) , Sopron (Komitat denburg) and Moson (Komitat Wieselburg).

EMAIL MESSAGE FROM HEINZ KOLLER IN GSSING
There will be some interesting events in Gssing next year (1999): The
"Burgspiele Gssing" (historical drama performed at the castle every summer)
from June 24th til July 17th will be concerned with the theme "Amerika - hin
und retour"! Dr. Walter Dujmovits, president of the "Burgenlndische
Gemeinschaft" is a member of the committee for awarding prizes for the best
three of ten submited projects. For stage management we could gain
Burgschauspieler Frank Hoffmann, a famous dramatic actor, who already knows
America very well. I hope you will be interested in giving this news to the
members of the Burgenland Bunch.

Refering to Rosenberg: I was born in Langzeil, my wife in Rosenberg. Her
Mother's name was Gerger, her father - Alois Sammer - is one of the brothers
of the former landlord Johann Sammer in Langzeil. One of my mother's sisters
was married to Alois Artinger in Langzeil. In the 50's my family lived in the
hous of Johann Sorger in Gssing, Josef-Reichl-Strae, who owned some plots
of land in Rosenberg... Maybe its interesting for you! I should be glad to
meet you on your next journey to Austria. By the way: My parents will go to
New York next week to visit two sisters (Rosy Schmidt, Margaret Yost) and the
brother (Frank Koller) of my mother.

And last I will tell you of my new homepage "Heinele's home", where you can
find a lot of words and expressions "Hianzisch":
http://members.xoom.com/Heinele
With best greetings, Heinz Koller, A-7540 Gssing, Bergstrae 13;
http://www.bnet.at/guessing
(Newsletter Continued As No. 44A)

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