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Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 49 dtd 31 dec 1998 (edited)
Date: Wed, 7 Jul 1999 07:40:35 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 49
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(issued biweekly by )
December 31, 1998
HAPPY NEW YEAR!
All Rights Reserved. Permission to Copy Granted, but Give Credit.

***NOTE-THERE WILL BE NO NEWSLETTER AS SUCH JANUARY 15***
IN LIEU OF THE NEWSLETTER YOU'LL RECEIVE THE MEMBERSHIP LIST
25 PAGES IN THREE EMAIL TRANSMISSIONS

This first section of the 3 section newsletter features Villages of Limbach &
Neusiedl, Comments Concerning Old Ethnic Photographs, Emigration From
Szentpeterfa, Custom of "Blochziehen", and continuation of Emigration
Articles From The Volksfreund (4 of 5). Sections 49A & B are a belated Xmas
Gift-an Index to the first two years of the Burgenland Bunch Newsletter.

THE BURGENLAND HOME PAGE IS NOW AT >
http://www.spacestar.com/users/hapander/burgen.html
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VILLAGES OF LIMBACH & NEUSIEDL BEI GSSING (from the Father Leser Extracts &
Translations by Albert Schuch)
48) Limbach
The village territory consists of the following areas: Zollnberg, Holzberg,
Mahrbach, Kohlberg, Kreuten, Graben, Haufenberg, Hofried, Puichberg,
Grindlsberg, Soligraben, Feichtiggraben, Pfaffengraben. Old spellings of the
village name: Lympa (1428), Warrani anders Limbach (1455) etc. From the Urbar
of 1750: Richter: Hans SPRINGER; Geschworene: Matthias REICHL, Adam WURTH;
Farmer families: REICHL (10), WEINHOFER (5), BUICHES (5), ERNST, WURTH
(WIRTH), BESSENHOFER, LIST, DEUTSCH, SCHRAMPF, BRANTWEIN (2 each), SPRINGER,
KLOCK, HOLLER, RAM, GASTNER, WAGNER, GESTL, GRABNER, ASTL, FUX, FANDL,
KOGLMAN, FLIDER, HTTER; Sllner families: WEINHOFER (4), REICHL (3), KUCKS,
MUIK, HTTER (5 each [may be a typo and probably should read 2]); ADAM, KIRN
(KERN), FUX, GESTL, BUCHES, DEUTSCH, FANSTER, SNIDNITZ, KROBOTH, TRINKL,
WOXWENDER, WOLF, TAUCHER, KOHLECKER, ERNST, BRAUN, SCHOBER. The local
BATTHYANY estate was sold to the KOTTULINSKY, who in turn sold it to a
Hungarian bank. The bank sold it to local farmers in 1914. Inhabitants: 1812:
291 Catholics, 241 Lutherans; 1832: 332 C, 426 L; 1851: 760; 1870: 752; 1930:
340 C, 303 L; 30 Limbachers in America. 30 casualties in WW I.

Catholics: part of Kukmirn parish, church built in 1835. Catholic teachers:
Franz KORSCHANEK (1832), WEBER (1849-50), Matthias HANDLER (1850-53), Stefan
KAPPEL (1861), Josef TAUBER (1867), Paul MARX (1877), dn SCHUH (1877-82),
Karl MAAR (1882-86), Emmerich BRENNER (1886-1901), Anton KALKBRENNER
(1901-07), Josef PECHO (1907-09), Ludwig TELEKI (1909-11), Adolf HARMUTH
(1911-14; killed during WW I), Johann BISCHOF (1914-15), Bela BORSODI
(1916-17), Adolf SCHMIDT (1917-19), KarlSCHNEIDER (1919-25), Rudolf REISNER
(1926-28), Emil LAZANYI (1928-). Lutherans: part of Kukmirn parish. It cannot
be proven that the local Lutherans are Styrian refugees. Lutheran teachers:
Johann HAHN (-1875), Johann ORMOSSY (1876-79), Alexander EBENSPANGER
(1879-86), Karl MOOR (1886). (source: V+H Nr. 2/1959)

49) Neusiedl bei Gssing
Families listed in the 1693-Urbarium: 7 KHOH; 6 SCHRANGEN; 3 MARTEN,
KOGLMANE, KOBER; 2 KESSL, REICHL, BARTHOLOVICS, SCHMIDT, STANNER, KOGLMANN
aka WAGNER, KROBOTH, AMTMANN, MUIK, PRAX, PRENTNER, GRAF, MILLNER, TCKNER,
SCHWARZ, TOFFERL, WOLF, FABIAN, SIEGL, DARICS, CHAH; Sllner: MARTEN, HESSL,
BAUER, KOBER, KHOH, FRIDERICS, BARTL, DEUTSCH, WAGNER, KONCZ, BASTL; 2
POMMER, WILFINGER.

Number of inhabitants: 1812: 288 Catholics, 282 Lutherans; 1930: 397 C, 437
L; ca. 60 persons living in America (in 1930). Catholic teachers: Josef FREI
(1876), LEITNER, KUKU, Franz PINTER, SCHNIDERITS, HORVAT, Paul KORNAUTH
(1892), Johann BRUNNER, Julius SZENTGYRGYI (1894), PLESZ, DAVID, Adalbert
KREM, Katharina ZMARITS, KOCSICS, Ladislaus KLAVSKY (1914-18), Hans GILL
(1922-26), Karl SCHUH and Alois DUSCHEK (1926), Wilhelm LOSERT (1926-30),
Josef MARLOVITS (1930-); Lutheran teachers: Samuel LASCHOBER (1871-1912),
Matthias TRATTNER (1912-1930). (source: V+H Nr. 3/1959)

COMMENTS CONCERNING OLD ETHNIC PHOTOGRAPHS (from Audrey De Blasio) (Ed. Note:
while this member solved her problem, I include the correspondence in the
event other members may be seeking similar help and not know of the
facilities available.)

Dear Gerry: I read with interest information in the Burgenland Bunch
newsletter about old photographs. My father's aunt, Amelia Hammer Binder who
was born February 13, 1891 in Griselstein, Burgenland had some old
photographs that her grandson now owns. Her grandson has provided me with
color copies of these "unidentified" photographs. These old photographs
originated in Burgenland, Austria. The studio photographers name/information
shown is "Photografisches Atelier RUDOLPH ANDRECS - Jennersdorf." There is
also one signed "Matinelli Wachf(?) - Graz" There are also a couple of
amateur portraits. These photos would have probably been mailed to the U.S.
to my father's aunt or her husband, Anton Binder (who is my grandmother's
brother) sometime shortly after 1913 (when they married). No living relative
here in the U.S. can identify these family portraits. Can you or someone in
the bunch help me as to how I can find out if these studios still exist? Has
anyone had a similar experience and been successful in identifying their
photos? Is there a newspaper in Jennersdorf (name and address) that would
put these photos in their paper for identification? Is this how I start?
The good news is my father's aunt's grandson found one very important
photograph none of us knew existed, it was of my great-grandfather, Franz
Binder, taken at age 90 "somewhere in Austria". It was a thrill to find this
and share with my father and his siblings. Moral: Identify your
photographs! Thank you. Audrey Leiner DeBlasio ()

This was later followed by:
Thank you for checking about the portrait studio. Hold putting my request
in the newsletter! I was just doing some playing around on the computer. I
saw "AOL White Pages" and lo and behold you can look up names and addresses
of people in Austria. I have found some Leiners and Binders listed in
Jennersdorf (Rax). I am going to write to them to find out if they are
related. Then if so, I will send copies of the photographs to them for
identification as I am sure they must be photos of relatives. I was
thrilled to find these names and addresses. I hope I have success! Merry
Christmas to you too! Thank you again. Audrey Leiner DeBlasio

EMIGRATION FROM SZENTPETERFA
Mathew Kurtz () sends the following:

Emigration from Szentpeterfa (Petrovo Selo,Prostrum)
Between the years 1800 and 1900 the population in Hungary more than doubled.
In Szentpeterfa it was even more drastic, because among the Croats the
increase of population was higher then average. Under the Austrian-Hungarian
Monarchy, industrialization was very slow. The fields (farms), by inheritance
become smaller and smaller. (Ed. note: Hungarians did not practice
primogeniture inheritance where only the oldest inherited) Therefore the
traditional farmer style (paraszt) living could not support the fast growing
population. Before the turn of Century, some migrated into the neighbouring
cities: Kormend, Szombathely (Steinamanger) Vienna, Graz, Budapest. After
the turn of the entury, mass emigration to the USA took place.

According to Vas County Archives ( Vas Megyei Leveltar), in the year of 1900
the first emigrants were: Ferenc Jurasits and his wife, Janos Paukovits,
Ferenc Paukovits and his wife Maria Jurasits and their daughter. Another
record from Northampton PA. says : Istvan Weszelovits, Andras Jurasits and
Janos Gerencser were the first settlers in Northampton PA. (The discrepancy
between the two reports may be due to the fact that at that time many people
came without any papers)

In the year 1900 six persons came to USA, 1901 twelve, 1902 twenty, 1903
twenty-one and in 1904 six. In the year 1904 there were already 65 people
living in Northampton PA. from Szentpeterfa. These people , one after
another brought their relatives to USA. In 10 years about 300 families were
involved in this emigration. During the Depression many families moved from
Northampton to New York City. Also they scattered to the neigbouring towns:
Nazareth, Bethlehem, Allentown etc. These emigrants never intended to settle
down permamently (in the US), rather (they intended) to save enough money
to build their houses back home, buy some property and return to their
hometown and continue the traditional farm (paraszt) livelihood.

At the end of WW II. the situation changed drastically. Hungary was
occupied by Russians and a totalitarian comunist system was established. The
Iron Curtain was erected between East and West. Under these circumstances
nobody wanted to return to Hungary. Just the opposite, everybody wanted to
escape. From 1948 to 1956 about 20 people crossed the dangerous life-
threatening border to the Austrian, Burgenland. When the 1956 revolution was
crushed, more than 300 people escaped from Szentpeterfa, most of them young
adults, but there were some families with small children. Most of these
refugees settled in New York City, Northampton, PA and Chicago. Some settled
in in Ohio, California, and Canada. Around 1970, about 20 people escaped
through the barbwired and mined border to Burgenland. All of them found their
way to America. At present there is no emigration, except occasionally by
mariage to American citizens.

Our people from Szentpeterfa ( Petrovo Selo, Prostrum) are intermarried with
people from Burgenland, Austria, and Hungary. With this background we should
be proud of our ancestors, who have certainly enriched life in America.

CUSTOM OF BLOCHZIEHEN (from Fritz Knigshofer)
In the article on Berghold references from Der Volksfreund in the BB
newsletter no. 47B, I also made a brief guess that the custom of
"Blochziehen" might compare to tug-of-war. I now know that this guess was
very misleading and needs to be corrected.

According to the large Brockhaus encyclopedia, "Blochziehen" is a custom
widely in use in the 15th and 16th century, but today only found in Tyrol,
Eastern Styria and Burgenland. Girls who are of marriageable age but still
single, draw a long log ("Baumstamm" or "Bloch") into the village, where it
gets auctioned. The proceeds of the auction are used to stage a feast. The
custom is carried out during Fasching, the carnival season before Lent. A
related custom in German lands is the Pflugziehen (plough drawing) staged on
the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, when marriageable girls draw a plough
around the village, followed by a feast meal of all the villagers.

My father who grew up in Burgenland tells me that the Blochziehen was staged
in years when there had been no marriage yet in a village, i.e., no
opportunity yet for the village to celebrate and enjoy a feast. Perhaps there
is additional memory or knowledge among the Burgenland Bunch about the
details of this custom.

EMIGRATION ARTICLES FROM THE "VOLKSFREUND"- EARLY 1900's (4 of 5)
(Ed. Note: this is the final series of Volksfreund articles written at the
turn of the century by Adolf Knigshofer, school teacher in Poppendorf, and
contributing columnist to the newspaper "Volksfreund". Extracted and
translated from the original by Adolf's great-grandson, our Austrian
Contributing Editor, Fritz Knigshofer. It is different in that not only does
it contain the story of a returning emigrant but one who earned his money in
the western U. S. as opposed to the east.)

Fritz writes: Re: Emigration (4 of 5), final series of Volksfreund articles.
The following story belongs to the ones showing the attraction of the United
States of America as a place to work and earn money. While I myself have not
yet visited the place described in the story, it appears that the returned
emigrant speaks about Yellowstone Park.

>From Der Volksfreund, 12 December 1908, pages 3 and 4:
"What a returning emigrant told me. 'Mr. Teacher, have you already heard
about the American National Park?' a returned emigrant recently asked
me.'Yes, I have heard of it, but not much!' I replied. 'In that case, listen.
Last summer I worked at the construction of a new hotel in the National
Park. This park is so large that the entire parks of all European
metropolises taken together do not approach its size; the park is located far
out in the West, and can comfortably be reached by train. Every year it is
visited by the thousands who go there to look at its natural attractions.
There is nothing artificial there, nothing made by man as in a city;
everything is nature. The park is supervised by park police, mounted on
horses, all handsome young men and mostly Germans. It is strictly forbidden
to take anything with you as a souvenir, be it a stone, a flower, a plant
etc., as is also scrawling on trees and rocks. --

There are several big inns and hotels in the park, some of which belong to
one and the same company; they are built of timber and resemble large
loghouses, and are very spacious inside, so that the wealthiest and the
poorest all find best accommodation; the buildings are miles apart from each
other; mostly, you find them near the special sights of the park.
The park varies from small plains full of grass, the most beautiful spruce
forests, to hilly terrain and to mountain ranges which from far away look
like fortresses. In the mountains you find the lake with the highest
altitude of North America, 8,000 meters [must mean: feet] high. Brooks and
rivers full of fish run through the valleys. The rivers sometimes form
waterfalls up to 360 meters down. Then there are the warm geysers (springs)
which send their water to towering heights; many of these are there; they
are strewn all over the park and erupt at irregular intervals. One of them
erupts every minute and has the name Minuteman; another every 15, yet
another every 65-75 minutes, and yet another every 17-24 days. Some discharge
the purest water, while others eject mud coming from within the earth 10 to
150 meters high. Here and there, a warm spring bubbles over steps of rock;
on these steps, sinter gets formed, so that the steps look like marble. Hot
steam also arises from the earth, and hours-long roaring can be heard from
the respective mouths. Furthermore, a lot of holes can be found in the soil,
which are relics of once active geysers; deep down one can still hear a
mysterious hissing and roaring.

Indeed, Mr. Teacher, if you yourself would have gone through all of what I
have seen and experienced, you could tell a lot; people like us don't pay
much attention; we look only for money in America, everything else is
peripheral. I thank the Lord for the happy return to my folks. I have been
able to render my house free of debts, have even been able to acquire a
little bit additional land, and have stashed away a few florins cash as well;
had I stayed back here instead, they would have sold my little house over
me, and I could now serve as a farmhand somewhere. My wife and children
would be in poverty. Yes, this America was a blessing
for me." [end of article]
(newsletter continues with 49A-Index)

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