BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L Archives

Archiver > BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER > 1999-07 > 0931435920


From: <>
Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 53 dtd 15 Mar 1999 (edited)
Date: Thu, 8 Jul 1999 08:12:00 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 53
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(issued biweekly by
March 15, 1999
(all rights reserved)
Isn't genealogy fun? The answer to one problem leads to two more!

This first section of the 3 section newsletter contains data concerning our
Recent Trip to Austria, southern Burgenland villages of Eltendorf,
Poppendorf and Heiligenkreuz, Early South Burgenland School Problems and More
on Oberkrain Music and Music in Burgenland.

RETURN FROM AUSTRIA (by G. Berghold)
Ten days in Salzburg and Vienna fly by and we are once again in our home
although we did bring snow back with us. A very pleasant trip made even more
so by the gracious Vienna hospitality of my cousin and BB member Klaus
Gerger. Meeting Klaus, his lovely wife Heidi and their two fine daughters and
Albert Schuch and his lovely and talented sister Inge were memorable
experiences. We stuffed ourselves with Heidi Gerger's excellent Burgenland
cuisine (including five desserts!) washed down with Burgenland wine and
talked for hours. Klaus had also met with me for two evenings in Salzburg
where he went for a business trip while we were there. Klaus was also able to
extend one of my Gssing family lines by a recent visit to the Gssing
cloister.

I brought home much new material in the way of books and music and will be
sharing it in future newsletters. Both Klaus and Albert gave me much material
and we discussed possible approaches to researching the Eisenstadt RC
Diocesan archives. I now have all 6 K & P "Bezirk" books (the seventh and
last, Bezirk Neuseidl is in process). I also have a list of the Gssing
cloister church record holdings courtesy of Klaus and a BB Oberwart Zeitung
(OZ) article recently written by Albert and translated by Inge. I have Robert
Hajszan's book "Die Kroaten der Herrscaft Gssing" and a cursory scan tells
me he agrees with the history (Dobrovich's) Frank Teklits has translated
which should make Frank very happy. It has an English summary which I'll
publish. Many other books I haven't had the opportunity to scan. Albert found
and gave me a delightful little book "Burgenland"-Pflagner & Marco-1970 which
pictures and describes 80 villages and sites in Burgenland with both German
and English descriptions. A cut above the usual tourist book and I plan to
use it for a new series of articles.

We had always wanted to see Austria during the winter when the countryside
was covered with snow and the tourist crowds wouldn't be so great (so we
thought). A brochure from the Lehigh University Alumni Association offered a
mid February week in Salzburg (salt fortress) plus three days in Vienna so we
convinced ourselves that we needed a mid winter break. I'm preparing a 1999
OSCAR 'Open Salt Collectors Atlantic Region' program on open salt dishes from
the A/H Empire and I also wanted to meet with Albert and Klaus, so I had lots
of excuses to go.

Lufthansa flights from Dulles to Frankfurt and Munich put us on a bus to the
Crown Pitter Hotel in Salzburg. Land (Province) Salzburg was one of the few
Austrian areas that we had not visited in depth before so a week there was
not too much. For centuries Salzburg was an extremely wealthy Bishopric of
the Holy Roman Empire, its wealth deriving from the sale of salt from mines
found throughout the area. It was the birthplace of Mozart and is now the
center of the annual world famous Salzburg Music Festival. Following an
orientation tour we went just a short distance from the well known "Getreide
Strasse, main shopping street, to the antique area in the old town called the
"Gold Gasse" (gold alley) looking for salt dishes. It was appropriately named
as most antiques were priced their weight in gold. Our guide had warned us to
beware of the "antique pirates". We did buy a pair of Monot Stumpf art glass
salts. A number of Austrian Biedermeier silver salts from the first half of
the 1800's were also available. Salzburg's china and porcelain shops were
full of modern Meissen, Herend, Rosenthal and other fine china and glass.

We visited the Dom (cathedral), museums, palaces, and churches and other
sites of interest. On the staircase leading to the main art museum we found a
magnificent fresco of a family tree tracing 7 generations of a noble family
complete with coats of arms. In the shape of a tree with leaves and roots and
in color it was breath taking. We bought many books including folk music.
While we were told it was not as crowded as usual, there were still plenty of
tourists. Salzburg derives 30% of its income from tourism. Of special note
was an evening of chamber music in the Mirabell Palace, a "Sound of Music"
tour (the Hollywood embroidered fairy tale which is bringing Salzburg much
custom), a visit to the Mozart residence, now a museum (one display shows his
complete works- a column of music ledgers ten feet high!), a blizzard while
touring the Hohensalzburg Fortress- built 1077 (we left via cog railway
before we were marooned for the night), a winter sleigh ride in the
Salzkammergut (the lake district) and a dine around package which provided
meals in six fine old restaurants. We then went to Vienna by bus and spent a
wet Sunday afternoon window shopping the antique shops (closed on Sunday)
clustered around St. Stephen's cathedral. Klaus then picked us up for dinner
as previously mentioned.

Snow and rain, so we took tours of St. Stephen's cathedral (much restoration
under way), Schnbrunn Palace and lots of antique shops including the
Dorotheum where we bought a "brautbecher" (bride's beaker). While space
prohibits further discussion of bride's beakers, they are unique European
items. The Dorotheum also had much antique art glass. On the way through the
airport as we left we found an Austrian Airlines gift shop displaying Herend
and Meissen porcelain. Look for it if you ever have time to kill at the
airport.

The weather was terrible, rain, snow, sleet, ice and slush with dark dismal
days. The sun appeared briefly on the day we arrived and when we left, but we
accomplished what we set out to do and we have another set of memories,
additions to our collections and lots of material to study until the crocus
begins to show. It's nice to be back although I wish I could visit with Klaus
and Albert more often. Too bad we couldn't visit Burgenland. Spring of the
year 2000 perhaps.

VILLAGES OF ELTENDORF, POPPENDORF AND HEILIGENKREUZ (from the Father Leser
Series, Extracts & Translations by Burgenland Editor Albert Schuch)

Ed. Note:With # 56, the Leser village series started many issues ago comes to
an end. We owe a great debt, not only to Father Gratian Leser who found,
extracted and had this material published in the 1930's, in many cases
translating into German from the original Latin or Hungarian, but also to
Albert Schuch for his subsequent summaries and English translations. To the
best of my knowledge, these are the first English translations of this data
to appear anywhere. As such I consider it one of the most important
achievements of the Burgenland Bunch todate. Family history researchers of
southern Burgenland now have access to English translations of the earliest
source extant showing family names in the 56 villages covered (about 14% of
all Burgenland villages). This would not have been possible without Albert
Schuch's arduous, dedicated and highly skilled efforts. I might add that it
took me the better part of a week in southern Burgenland finding and copying
similar data for just two villages, since I was not aware of a central
source. Albert's expertise took him directly to the source material archived
in Eisenstadt. If any of your villages are among those covered, you owe it to
your descendants to include a copy of the data in any family history you
prepare.

Albert writes: Gssing would be # 57, but this article is very long and has
been extensively used for the "Festschrift zur Stadterhebung" of Gssing in
1973. Since you have a copy of this book in your library you have all the
information. (Ed.-I will be preparing future newsletter articles concerning
families from this city from that source) In my translated extracts of # 1-56
I had to leave out large parts, as I concentrated on the Urbaria and other
surname-data.

Ed.-The following three villages are of special interest to me since they
were the family villages of the Berghold-Neubauer families. All members with
ties to Johann Berghold, Jr 1849-1929, Poppendorf and Theresia Neubauer
1854-1918, Eltendorf please take note. Heiligenkreuz was the first Burgenland
village inhabited by Bergholds pre 1690.

54) Eltendorf
Families listed in the 1750-Urbarium: 6 GIBISER; 4 SIMANCZ, GAAL; 3 PFEIFFER,
WEBER, KEFER, PLESL, WIESNER; 2 TAPLER, RSLER, SPIRK, POSCH, KANTZ, ZODL,
SIMEISTER, HEILIMANN; 1 HOLLER, GRASL, EBERHARD, MARX, HEBER, LASS, KERN,
WIRTH, GRLLER, LANG, MERTH, FISCHL, KNIG, SCHERMANN, JOST, KURZ, STEIDL.
Sllner-families: 2 HEILIMANN; 1 WAGNER, PEHMANN, BRAUN, BEITL, STEIFF, DEX,
RIENER. Quarrels between the inhabitants and the "Panduren" (policemen)
during the "Kommassierung" (land surveying following the abolishment of the
"Grundherrschaft").(Ed.-Led to the death of Johann Berghold, Sr. 1830-1863).
Since ca. 1860 a "Kreisarzt" (district physician) resides in Eltendorf. The
first one was a man named GRASL. 4 physicians in 1930: Dr. Alois ZANIN
(Kreisarzt), Dr. Ludwig ZIEGELBAUER, Dr. Elise ZIEGELBAUER (DDS), Dr. Albin
GNTHER (veterinarian). Number of inhabitants: 1779: 135 Catholics, 376
Lutherans; 1812: 150 C, 519 L; 1930: 714 inhabitants in 141 houses.
Catholics: Children go to school in Knigsdorf. Lutherans: Increased in
number around 1600, when Styrian refugees arrived. Belonged to Zahling parish
until ca. 1650, then to Knigsdorf until ca. 1671. In 1783 a parish was
established in Eltendorf. Church records start in November 1783 (including
the Lutherans of Knigsdorf, Rudersdorf, Poppendorf, Heiligenkreuz,
Raabfidisch, Oberradling, Gssing, Neuhaus, Tauka, Liba, Minihof, Mhlgraben
and Krottendorf). In 1792 Neuhaus became an independent parish, in 1990 Ober-
and Unterradling became parts of the new Sankt Gotthard parish, in 1922
Raabfidisch followed. Pastors in Eltendorf: Daniel KLEMENT (1783-1804),
Johann HOLNDONNER (1804-43), Franz UNGER (1843-66), Karl TOMKA (1866-1908),
Alexander EBENSPANGER (1909-30). Lutheran teachers: Samuel BECK (1787-93),
Christoph WUKY (1793-1821), Michael KNBEL (1821-69), Friedrich BENEDEK
(1869-1911), Samuel BAUER (1911-29), Adalbert KARNER
(1929-30). 73 pupils in 1930. (source: V+H Nr. 7/1959)

55) Poppendorf
Families mentioned in the 1748-Urbarium: 4 MEDL, JUSICS; 3 JANY, STERN,
DRAUCH, HEMMER; 2 GIBISER, FASCHING, GRLLER, STOLZER, HBER, STEINER,
GALLITZ; 1 GAMLER, ZACH, KLANATZKY, PTZ, KOLLER, SCHERMANN, WEIDINGER,
NIKLES, MAYER, SCHLEHNER, ZWICKL, LEITGEB, MARX, HADENWOLFF, GLLES, SPITZER,
GERGER, ZIEGER, WIRTH, POPOFCSICS, KREN, UNGER, PREINER, SCHAUKOWITSCH,
MLLNER. Sllner-families living on church-owned land: 3 NIKLES; 2 UNGER,
MEDL; 1 DEUTSCH, SCHRAML, PETZ, BAUMANN, DRAUCH, PREINER; Sllner-families
living in the village: 3 MEDL; 1 JANY, UNGER, DRAUCH, ZODL, KREN;
Sllner-families living on the Heidenberg: 2 GRLLER; 1 MATTES, ZACH, KOLLER,
HARNISCH, LEITGEB; Sllner-familie living on the Goldberg: 3 JISICS, STELZER;
2 STEINER, GRLLER, GIBISER;1 ZWICKL, WEIDINGER, HEIDENWOLF, BRANSTEIN,
SCHERMANN, SCHLEHNER, HEMMER. Number of inhabitants: 1812: 228 Catholics, 67
Lutherans; 1876: 631 C 119 L; 1924: 554 C, 120 L; Catholics: always belonged
to Heiligenkreuz parish. Catholic teachers: Michael MAYER (1849-51); Johann
WEBER (1861), Karl KAISER (1863), Emil
LANGASCH (1876-95), Adolf KNIGSHOFER (1895-1914), Florian KNAUS
(1914-20), Franz THALER (1920-38). Lutherans: belong to Eltendorf parish.
Teacher in 1930: Gustav EBENSPANGER. (source: V+H Nr. 8/1959)

56) Heiligenkreuz im Lafnitztal
Inhabitants mentioned in early documents: In 1639 Adam BENK owns a farm that
had once been owned by a Michl PIGL, whose neighbours had been Hans PINTER
and Philipp SCHWARZ. In 1681 the widow of the miller Georg BECZKOVICS is
mentioned, in 1693 Feitl KROBOTH, Georg PAMKERER, Hans SCHABHTTL and Stefan
HIBER. Families listed in the 1693-Urbarium: 6 SCHMIDT; 4 BERSCHINGER; 3
STEIDL, JANY, SCHWARZ, DEUTSCH; 2 PAMKEHRER, LACKNER, PUM, POMPER,
HOFSTDTER, FISCHL, TURCSY, STELTZER, FAX, KLEPEIS, PLATZER; 1 SEIDL,
PETERMANN, PREISINGER, PIGL, MARTIN, GYERI, OBERECKER, SCHUSTER, STINYAKI,
JAKOSBACHER, ROSNER, MOLNAR, KNAUS, NEUBAUER, PTL, KOLLER, MILLNER,
SCHERMANN, ROTH, BAUER, HEMMER, TRETTNER, PINDER, TADUSICH, SERGNHOFFER,
KNIGRATH, FLEISCHHACKER, GERENCSER, KALCHER, KADNER, JOST,
GOTTHARD, PALANKOVICH, OSPOCHER, UNGER, SZAKACS; Libertini (free(d)
families): SCHABHTTL, ZACH, KROBOTH, MILLNER, STEDN, FAX, PAUKOVICH;
Sllner-families living in their own house: GIGER, PIKL, RABOLT, KOLLER,
TURCSY, NIKLES, MARX, LACKNER, ROSNER, EDER, TADUSCHIK, DEUTSCH, HAFFNER,
BAUER; Sllner-families without houses of their own ("Inwohner"): 2 BERGHOLD;
1 NIKLES, GYERI, STELTZER, STEIDL, BERSCHINGER, TURCSY, FLEISCHHACKER. Gipsy
families first mentioned in the church records 1749: SARKZI, BARANYAI,
HORVATH. In 1799 Andreas NIKISCHER, former "Richter" of the community, died
at the age of 83.
Post office transferred to H. in 1779 from Rabafzes (Raabfidisch). First
post-master was Josef PSORNER (PSCHORNER). In 1791 his daughter Juliana died,
in 1797 his son Josef is mentioned in the records. In 1819 Johann HAUSMLLER,
"Ludirektor" (= teacher) of H. married Juliana PSCHORNER. In 1845 post-master
Josef PSCHORNER died at the age of 52. He was succeeded by his grandson Anton
HAUSMLLER, who died 1884. In 1824 almost the whole village destroyed by
fire. In 1917 16 houses burned down. Number of inhabitants: 1779: 499
Catholics, 208 Lutherans; 1876: 900 C, 296 L, 7 Jews; 1910: 1261 C, 320 L, 8
J; Catholics: In 1757 the Heiligenkreuz parish included Poppendorf,
Raabfidisch, Jakabhaza, Oberradling and Inzenhof. During the construction of
the new church in 1796, 16 year old Maria TURTSCHY fell from the tower and
died. Priests: Andreas KLSCHER (1698), Johann Christophorus GRAZL (1710-27),
Johann Baptist LEITNER (1727-30), Franz HAIDER (1730-32), Christian PIMPERL
(1733-55), Josef Ignatz HATZL (1755-61), Adam CSIK (1761-68), Jakob KOVACSICS
(1768-71), Johann MENGEL (1771-83), Johann Karl SZOKOLY (1783-85), Michael
GOMBAS (1785-95), Michael EBERL (1795-1811), Andreas SPANRAFT (1811-35),
Anton GRILLER (1836-49), Josef KAMETLER (1849-78), Franz EHRNHOFFER
(1878-89), Josef CZIGLER (1879-89), Anton MARTIN (1889-1916), Karl NEUBAUER
(1916-).
Catholic teachers: Karl MARX (died 1737), Philipp SAJER (ca. 1752-57),
Michael VEINER (1774-82), Anton GROSZ (died 1784), Lorenz NITSCH (ca. 1812),
Johann HAUSMLLER (1819-32), Alois POLY (1853-94), Paul KORNAUTH (1894-1907),
Michael BADER (1907-), Barbara PERENYI (1922-). Lutherans: Pastors: Michael
RICARDI (1616-20), Johann SCHEFFLER (1623-27), Nikolaus BALOGH (1646). The
Visitatio Canonica of 1698 still counts 427 Lutherans and only 169 Catholics,
but the the number of the Lutherans decreased rapidly in the middle of the
18th century. Lutheran elementary school established in 1872. Teachers:
Johann BAUER (1872-73), Eduard SCHERMANN (1873-1914), Gustav KARNER (1914-).
(source: V+H Nr. 8-11/1959)

EARLY SOUTH BURGENLAND SCHOOL PROBLEMS (Fritz Knigshofer)
Ed. Note: Following the reforms engendered by the Revolution of 1848,
Austrian and Hungarian school teachers had the daunting job of providing a
basic education which would eventually bring a mostly uneducated peasantry
into the modern era. Today's excellent Burgenland school system is
indicative of their success. The opportunity to achieve an education
through the doctoral degree with government support, available in Austria
today, is not matched by many countries. It would have been unthinkable in
our ancestors' time. Post 1848 school teachers had their work cut out for
them. Large classes and poor facilities were just two of their problems. Not
only did they personally have to cope with German, Latin and Hungarian
(Croatian in some cases), they had insure that their students knew enough
German and Hungarian to cope with normal bilingual relationships. In
addition, students who had the opportunity and ability to advance to
positions within the government, had to be fluent in Hungarian and often
Latin as well. We have already printed one article in which my
2g-grandfather, Mihaly Mhl, teacher in Urbersdorf coerced the authorities to
rebuild his school. Fritz Knigshofer has now found further examples of the
educational struggle. He writes:

"When recently visiting Budapest, I managed to continue reading issues of Der
Volksfreund. In 1889, I hit upon a huge controversy about the circumstances
of the teacher job in Fels Rnk. Over several issues of Der Volksfreund,
letters were written by the various parties. I believe the core issue was
the discontent of the teacher at the time, Andreas Schlamadinger, about his
pay conditions, specifically his inability to collect the full agreed
remuneration from the families in the village and of two neighboring villages
that sent children to the school in Oberradling.

The controversy in the newspaper started in late April 1889 with an article
about the general misery of the teaching conditions, an article that for
insiders must have clearly alluded to the specific situation in Oberradling.
This was followed by a letter to the editor. Then, in the issue of May 11,
1889, the r-c pastor of Oberradling, Nikolaus Herczeg, published a statement
about the session of the village's school council, to which the village judge
Franz Artinger added a further letter. I believe both opposed the earlier
story written by teacher Schlamadinger who, they stated, was not even capable
of writing correct letters in German and thus had been helped.

The controversy continued in the issue of June 1, 1889 with a letter from
Andreas Schlamadinger who distanced himself from the original article that
had stirred up the controversy, while defending himself against the charge of
lack of German language knowledge. A correspondent with the signature
"Veritas" (truth) added a further article on the matter. (I believe that
"Veritas" was the pseudonym used by a teacher in the Gssing/Strem area.) At
that point, the debate fizzled out.

Schlamadinger must have left the position soon afterwards since the teacher
position of Oberradling was advertised as vacant in the spring of 1890. It
appears it could not be filled for some time despite the nominally dcent
salary of 431 florins per year. Perhaps teachers knew about the inability of
actually collecting this remuneration. The post was readvertised in July
1890, and again in September 1890, when the offered remuneration was
increased to 497 florins and 40 kreutzer. I am not sure whether the position
was filled, but in January 1893 it was once again advertised, this time with
a remuneration of only 384 florins and 10 kreutzer, but with "decent living
quarters" added. At that time, my greatgrandfather Alois Koller won the
competitive selection and became the teacher of Oberradling. Perhaps some of
the other conditions had also been changed (such as the obligation to teach
children from other villages).

The time was already additionally impacted by the new and very serious
problem of the condition of the old church, and the need to build a new one.
When the old church was closed by the authorities due to its dangerous state,
mass services and church administration were moved into the school house,
once again making life intolerable for the teachers and their families.
Frustrated, Alois Koller resigned his post in Oberradling in mid 1899. The
next teacher successfully protested the conditions. In the early 20th
century not only was a new church built (consecrated in June 1905), but also
a new schoolhouse (in September 1909).

MORE ON OBERKRAIN AND BURGENLAND MUSIC (from Gerhard Lang)
Ed. Note: Gerhard had some problems with the article concerning Oberkrain
music. As he's a musician we're thankful for his corrections. He writes: "I
don't agree with that. (explanation).... That Oberkrainer music I know well -
the typical sound with a typical accordian-accompainment with chords in five
and six voices as created about 40 - 50 years ago by Slavko Avsenik. I've
bought some literature to practice his style of playing. Most of the famous
songs of "Slavko Avsenik und seine Original Oberkrainer" - the name has been
changed from Original Oberkrainer Quintett (I guess due to the development
from pure instrumental music to being accompained by singers and a 2nd
trumpet) - were composed by the brothers Slavko and Vilko Avsenik and are not
arrangements of what we normally understand as "traditional songs". The
typical instrumentation of an Oberkrainer-group is baritone (playing the
bass, some times solo-lines), guitar, accordion and some kinds of solo-parts)
1 or 2 trumpets and clarinet (playing the melody-line with fill by
accordion-solos). Typically there is no drumset. Some of these beautiful
melodies were written for 3 singers - two women and one man. In the last
years Slavko wrote a few songs for his son Gregor - who studied the guitar -
with difficult melody-lines for the guitar. I suggest everyone listen to
that. Slavko had to retire from the stage due to problems with his back from
playing his accordion for so many years - a typical illness for
accordionists. For anybody who's interested in getting a taste of Oberkrainer
music: prepare your browser to receive and play Midi-files, and try the
following URL: < http://members.aol.com/accrdnmn/index.html > and look for
the Oberkrainer page, select "Trompeten Echo" (Trumpet's Echo) or "Auf der
Autobahn" (On The Highway) for example and you'll soon know what Oberkrainer
music sounds like.

Tyroleans, Salzburgers and Upper and Lower Austrians and Burgenlanders and
Vorarlbergers all play this music. Most of the groups playing in the
"Oberkrainer style" use the typical elements of Avseniks' compositions.
Famous Austrian groups as the "(Zillertaler) Schu"rzenja"ger" (Tyrol) or the
"(Jungen) Klostertaler" (Vorarlberg) and many more use(d) that style.

(Ed.-Gerhard then translates the Oberkrain songs from my album Wine &
Songs-The Original Oberkrainer Quintet Avsenik-London International Stereo SW
99500. Songs are:)
Weinfest Polka (Na vinski razstavi), - Wine-Feast-Polka
Erinnerung an Zurich (Spomin na Zurich), - Remembrance To Zurich
Hatschi-Polka (Oh ta gripa), - Sneezing-Polka ("Hatschi" would describe sound
of sneezing)
Es war so schn (Lepo je bilo), - It was so beautiful
Sitzen wir froh beim Wein - Sitting Cheerful Over Some Wine
Scherben bringen Glck (the Slovene(?) for this is Case nalijmo si,
Matterhorn Marsch (Pogled na Matterhorn), - Matterhorn-March (the translation
Slovenian title would be "Look at the Matterhorn - well-known mountain in
Switzerland)
Wigel-Wogel-Polka Vigel-vogel-polka), - Reel to and fro ;-))
Der Wind bringt dir mein Lied (Veter nosi pesem mojo), - The Wind brings my
song to you
Lustiger Nachbar (Pri sosedovih na obisku), - Jolly Neighbour
Ich wart' auf dich! (Cakala bom), - I'm waiting for you!
Frohe Stunden (Vesele urice), - Happy hours
Denk mal an mich (Daj mi roko). - Think of me (I'd translate the Slovenian as
"Give me a hand")

The difference between the polka and the Lndler is that a bar in the polka
contains two beats and the bar in the Lndler contains three (maybe the waltz
developed from the Lndler but not the polka!) I can imagine that the person
who wrote that listened to a "Boarischer", which is also on two beats and
does not sound as fast as a polka....On the polka you must distinguish
between the "Oberkrainer" (faster) and the "Bohemian" style (slower). The
Bohemian style is the more traditional and I would say more typical in
Burgenland.

As far as I know Alfons Bauer was of Bavarian (German) origin and the titles
mentioned are written in a typical bavarian dialect.... in the film (Third
Man) the zither was played by Anton Kar(r)as, the composer of the "Third Man
Theme". (Ed. note: my memory suffered a real lapse on that one)

As I'm personally interested and love to listen to that kind of music (not
only due to my job playing in a dance-band and playing some times as a
"one-man-band", I learned a few things. I recently bought a few CD-records of
a Brass Band playing Polkas in the Bohemian style. "Koch-Records" produces
most of the groups playing popular music (one CD every 3 months containing
their recordings and a printed booklet with the musical notes), ....... Good
listening is a 9 CD series (2 for district Eisenstadt and 2 for Neusiedl) of
all the Burgenland (do you say "wind-orchestras") Blasmusikkapellen called
"Blasmusik aus dem Burgenland" and documents the work of all our
"Blasmusikkapellen". It containins records of mostly all the bands of all the
seven districts - a lot of polkas, marches and waltzes and a few modern
records were made of it. As I heard some days ago only a few entire sets are
available (I guess the set costs about US $100,-- but it is worth every
cent). As you see one of my well loved things is "Blasmusik" and besides
playing clarinet and marching as the tambour on marching events, I'm a
member of the board at Rust's Musikverein (treasurer, doing public relations,
.....). Last year I've been appointed to the board of the section for the
district of Eisenstadt of Burgenland's Blasmusik-Association, concerned with
public relations.

At the moment we are preparing for our 25th anniversary at Rust's Musikverein
and we've planned a lot of events through the year 1999. The three biggest
things will be a "Straenfest" at Whitsuntide, lasting two days with various
"Blasmusik-Vereinen" from Burgenland and abroad. One Band will be from
Styria, another from Germany and one from the Slovak Republic. Do you know
what a Straenfest is? Two roads at Rust will be closed to public traffic and
tables and seats will be put onto the street. Booths for selling food and
beverages will be errected and music will be played from 2.00 p.m. until
11.00 p.m. Lots of people and tourists are expected if the weather is fine -
it's the first such event at Rust and people love to sit in the open air,
listening to the music and enjoying Grillhendl (fried chicken), Grillwurst
(fried saussages) and other food and wine and beer (directly out of the
barrel). In August we will be going to Switzerland. Last year we were invited
to the celebration of the 150th anniversary of a Swiss musical society. Their
president spent his holidays at Rust, saw one of our guest-concerts and
invited us to bring one of these concerts to his village. We will give a
concert and be at the parade, but it will be a lot of stress too - being 12
hours on the bus for one tour. On Nov. 13th we will have our annual
"Martinikonzert". This year we also plan to go to Eisenstadt and play in the
cultural center there, they have a room for about 700 people and everybody is
anxious about filling that enormous number of seats. It's a lot of work- and
besides, some time must be left for doing my genealogical research (grin).
(newsletter continued as 53A)

This thread: