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Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 57 dtd 15 May 1999 (edited)
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 1999 07:36:56 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 57
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(issued biweekly by
May 15, 1999
(all rights reserved)

Any family tree produces some lemons, some nuts and a few bad apples
(as well as some real peaches and a few rare orchids).

This first section of the 3 section newsletter contains the start of a new
village series (The Upper Lafnitz), starting with the village of Wolfau. We
also have a Report of Genealogical Vandalism, What's Happening in Gssing,
More on Fandl Name, Behind the Scenes of the BB, Is Kossuth County, Iowa, a
Burgenland Enclave?, A Thank You-with the Origins of the BB, Excerpt from my
Delightful Little Travel Book and some current Austrian Travel Tips.

PLEASE READ - ARE YOU GETTING AN INFORMATION OVERLOAD?
The newsletter is now being emailed to 318 people. At 27 pages per issue,
we're taking up a lot of internet band width and filling a lot of mailboxes.
Some members may be getting an information overload. We've had a few ask if
they can remain on the BB membership list (and continue to have their data
listed on the home page) but be removed from the newsletter mailing list.You
certainly can. You won't hurt our feelings! If you are no longer interested
in receiving the newsletter please tell us via email, but be careful, if you
say "cancel" you'll be removed from everything. Just say "remove from mailing
list" and you'll no longer be sent newletters. You can always change your
mind and you can still read the newsletters from the homepage. They are
archived and may be scanned or downloaded anytime from a hyperlink in the
homepage. You can also scan the archives "catalog" to see what the
newsletters contain before scanning them. The first paragraph of each
newsletter also explains the contents. Combining the membership listing with
automatic receipt of the newsletter stems from the days when we had a few
dozen very active members who were constantly corresponding.

Remember you can be a member and list your genealogy data with us without
receiving the newsletter email. Just let us know.

We will soon be adding homepage links which will take you to individual
village data being stored within our web site network. This new feature is
due to the work of Bill Rudy. Our thanks to Bill as we wish to make data
retrieval as painless as possible. We have information for about 70 of the
400 Burgenland villages and it will take some time for us to load the data.
More villages are being researched daily.

LIST YOUR FAMILY QUERY WITH THE OBERWART ZEITUNG - CONTACT ALBERT SCHUCH -
SEE STAFF LISTING (SEC. B) FOR EMAIL ADDRESS

NEW VILLAGE SERIES-THE UPPER LAFNITZ (from Albert Schuch)
This is the start of a new series. The author is Dr. Josef LOIBERSBECK, born
1890 in Hodis (near Rechnitz) - died 1975 in Eisenstadt, who also wrote the
"Um Pilgersdorf und Kogl" series I sent last year. This first article is
about Wolfau.

From: Josef LOIBERSBECK: Das obere Lafnitztal. In: Burgenlndische
Heimatbltter 1963-64. The Upper Lafnitz Valley; 1) Wolfau, 2) Allhau, 3)
Buchschachen, 4) Kitzladen, 5) Loipersdorf.

1) Wolfau
First mentioned in 1365 as "Walho", in 1455 as "Walfaw". Belonged to the
noble family KVESKUTI, as a part of the Domain Buchschachen (including
Wolfau, Buchschachen, Allhau, Kitzladen and Loipersdorf). By way of marriage
the domain came into the hands of the CSORNAI family in 1416, who sold it in
1462 to Berthold von ELLERBACH, who in turn sold it to Wilhelm and Andreas,
sons of the famous Andreas BAUMKIRCHER in 1482. So these villages became part
of the Domain Schlaining (BATTHYANY property since 1527/44).

The Urbarium of 1539 lists 18 farmers with a full sessio: DORN, PLAN, SEILER
(2), RANF, RACH, NADLER, KONRAD, KRUMPFUSS, HHNL, PRIEDL, BAUER,
RIEMERSSTOCK, BISCHOF, RABOLD, FHWALD, ZENZ and KOHLMANN. The widow of Hanns
RANF owns 1/2 sessio, and the sessio of KOHLMANN is to be divided in two
halves soon. The farmers pay taxes on St. George's Day, St. Jacob's Day and
at Christmas. At Christmas they also have to give chicken and corn to the
landlord. The Urbarium further lists 3 Sllner without land (2 FLEISS and 1
GEMITOR) and 2 mills (owners: MLLNER and RAINER). The revenue of the
"Mautstelle" (customs office) is to be delivered to Schlaining Castle.

In 1600 a Lutheran preacher from Stubenberg (Styria) fled to Wolfau with his
wife and child. Lutheran pastors in Wolfau: Philipp WEITH (1647 from
Karpfen), Christoph WINKLER (from Augsburg; 1650), Andresas KREHER (from
Obermedling; 1650-52), Franz BRENNER (1665). The Catholic Visitatio of 1674
tells us that the church has "recently" been taken away from the Lutherans.
Catholic priest is Daniel RUISS from Bavaria, 43 years of age, he is also
priest of Allhau and Kemeten. The boys go to school in Kemeten.

The Catholic Visitatio of 1697 reports that the following inhabitants have
rented meadows and fields from the church: GRASSL, MUSSER, KOBER, KLAMPFER,
PUTZ, ZERL, MLLNER, SAILER, SIMMER, PAUER and HASIEBER. Priest is Dr. Johann
Jakob HASSENIUS from Eichfeld in Lower Saxony, 57 years old, in Wolfau since
1693. The vicary is in bad shape, but the inhabitants of Wolfau refuse to
repair it, they are in general hostile towards the priest. Teacher is
Sebastian HOCHHOFER, a Catholic. There is no school house. Of 450
inhabitants, 150 are still Protestants. The Catholic Vistiatio of 1713
reports that 2/3 of the parish members are still staunch Lutherans. Priest is
Johann Georg TENTIUS, 50 years, who came here from Vorau Abbey (Styria).

An Urbarium of 1715 counts 48 farmers: 12 with a half and 32 with a quarter
sessio. 9 quarter farms are deserted. Farmer names: 5 MUSSER, VORAUER; 4
PIMPERL; 3 GRUBER, KODNER, WEISS; 2 KOCH, MLL, SIMANDL, PERTL, LANG, GRASSL,
TLLER; 1 HIRTZ, GRILL, ZIEGLER, HASIEBER, FISCHER, MLLNER, GARTNER,
KRUTZLER, NEUBAUER, SAMPEL, GDERL, STAMPFL, BISCHOF, PUTZ, HOHOFER, TOLLING,
IGLER, BINDER, KRUMPFUSS, MERKER. The names of the two Sllner are SEIDL and
KRENNERIN (i.e. wife/widow of KRENNER). (By the year of 1715, the BATTHYANY
family had already split up in different branches and hence this Urbarium
probably doesn't describe the whole village!)

Urbarium 1766: 112 farmers (33 with 1/2, 39 with 3/8, 40 with 1/4 and 1 with
1/8 sessio) and 74 Sllner. Farmer names: 9 MLLNER; 8 KODNER, MUSSER; 7
VORAUER; 6 PIMPERL, FLASCH, SCHLLER; 5 MADL; 4 GRASSL, KOCH, ZETTL; 3
BISCHOF, PERTL, STELZER, GOGER; 2 GDERL, WEISS, SIMANDL, KRUMPFUSS, WEIGL,
IGLER, HIMMLER, SEMMLER; 1 TEILER, MHL, HIRTZER, TRIEBAUMER, STAMPFL,
KRUTZLER, ABRAHAM, HASIEBER, NEUBAUER, WILFINGER, PORT, LEBER, KAUFMANN,
SAMPL, STROBL, SCHNEIDER, SEIDL. Sllner names: NADLER, HAINDL, KAINRAT etc.
In 1770 Jewish grocer Aaron VEIT opens up his shop, in 1781 a brandy
distillery.

Urbarium 1846: 116 farmers (1 with 7/16, 24 with 3/8, 5 with 5/16, 61 with
1/4, 1 with 1/3, 15 with 1/8, 2 with 1/16 sessio) and 104 Sllner. Farmer
names: 11 SCHLLER; 9 MLLNER, PIMPERL, KARNER; 6 BISCHOF; 5 MADL; 4 MUSSER,
FLASCH, GRASSL, MHL, FRAUER; 3 GOGER, HIRTZ; 2 STAMPFL, GDERL, IGLER,
HOCHSTETTER, LEBER, HOHALD, WEIGL, PERTL, WIEDERER, UNGER, HINKER; 1 LEITNER,
SIMANDL, LIEBHART, KRAUSS, WEISS, KINELLY, MEIXNER, TRIEBAUMER, STELZER,
TEILER, PIELER, FAHRT, BRENNER. Catholic Priests: Johann TAUCHER (1724-39),
Matthias WUKOWITSCH (1739-61), Johann Alois KUTSCHY from Rattersdorf
(1762-1807), Georg KERTSCHELITSCH from Hodis (1807 12; went to Neuhaus),
Franz Xaver TOMPEK from Gns (1812-16), Johann SCHENK from Steinamanger
(1816-1848; died 1848), Ignaz PERNHOFER from Gns (1851-56), Johann MARTON
from Hodis (1856-84; died 1884), Alois WALLNER from Pinkafeld (1884-89; went
to Weichselbaum), Alexander SCHAFFER from Oberwart, son of a physician
(1888-1913; emigrated to the USA, returned to Gns in 1927), Franz JANISCH
from Eisenzicken (1913-18; went to Unterbildein), Kolomann MERKL from
Rauchwart (1918-21; went to Oberkohlsttten), Josef BARTAL from Lockenhaus
(1921-33), Franz KUGLER (-1951), Heinrich RUDASI (1951-).

Kemeten became an independent parish in 1809. Catholic teachers: Anton HOSS
(1757), Anton SCHWARZ from Hannersdorf (Visitatio 1832 says he is 60 years
old, in Wolfau for 40 years, assited by his son Johann), Anton MLLNER,
WILTMEIER, Johann FRAUER, Michael BRENNER (1862-75; married Maria SCHLLER),
Kolomann BRENNER (1890-1919), Josef TUNKL (1923-1925), Franz WAGNER
(1926-38). Church records start in 1755.

After the laws of tolerance 1781 the Lutheran parish Allhau came into being.
82 families from Wolfau became part of this parish (names: GDERL, HAHOLD,
VORAUER, GRASSL, PIMPERL, SCHILLER, MUSSER, GOGER, KARNER, WEIGL, MLLER,
ZIEGLER, HINKER). In 1831 a Lutheran school was built. Teachers: Johann
KARNER, Alexander NIKA (1847-52; teacher's son from Allhau), Johann HERMANN
from Goberling (1853-57), Josef NIKA, brother of the above (1857-74), Johann
ZUMPF from Drumling (1874-76), Michael BHM from Unterschtzen (1876-1902),
Johann SCHRANZ from Jormannsdorf (1902-13), Karl GOGER from Oberschtzen
(1913-27), Johann SCHADEN from Riedlingsdorf (1927-38). Catholic and Lutheran
school united in 1938. Teachers: Alois KARNER (1945-49), Franz WAGNER
(1950-53), Hermann HAAS (1953-). Number of inhabitants: 1843: 795 Catholics,
568 Lutherans; 1910: 271 houses (of these 82 with straw roofs), 966
Catholics, 687 Lutherans, 3 Jews.

GENEALOGICAL VANDALISM (from Bob Unger)
Sad but unfortunately true. During a recent German Research Association
meeting, here in the San Diego area, the speaker made a very shocking
comment. He said that many churches in Europe are being swamped with
Americans doing genealogical research. Unfortunately a few have resorted to
tearing pages out of the original old record books. How sad. As a consequence
many churches have resorted to not allowing individuals to handle their
record books, and the only way to get information is with the assistance of
someone from the church staff. Staff members do not often have the time to
help (and thus another source of data is closed).

Ed. Note: I had access to the Martin Luther Kirche Church Records, 1770-1993
in Eltendorf, Burgenland. Many were fragile and very brittle. Many of the
older pages were foxed, torn and stained. There was much ink bleed through.
Some pages had to be supported on both sides before turning. Bindings were
split. I did not feel that I could subject them to copier handling. When the
Pastor suggested I use the church copier I refused as I didn't want to chance
splitting the bindings further, nor did I know what the high intensity strobe
might do to old ink and paper. The records were stored in a locked metal
cabinet in the church office and the older volumes were wrapped in sheets of
plastic, so they were taking care of them. I was happy to see that pages
prior to 1945 had been copied and archived by the Lutheran Church (binders
were so stamped with their seal). It took a few hours every day for the
better part of 11 days for my wife and I to review and hand copy the data we
wanted (every record for our family names), even though there were indices
for some years. Access to records as old as this is best left to some one who
knows how to handle them, much less some vandal. It is always best if we can
work from available microfilm; and we are fortunate in having the LDS film
available to us. Hopefully the LDS will be able to film pre 1828 records
before they disappear. I can't comment on people who remove or damage such
records without using language which would offend you.

WHAT'S HAPPENING IN GSSING (from Heinz Koller)
Heinz reports that the following meeting of "litereati" took place in
Gssing recently. It would have been most interesting to be able to attend.

Ulrike Winkler-Hermaden, a native of Gssing, presented her new novel
"Heimat", which is about a Southern Burgenland family.

Heinz Koller talked about his book "tief verwurzelt", a collection of his
Hianzisch poetry, to be published in June.

Christian Putz, student from Pinkafeld, who is the author of the epilogue
written for this year's "Burgspiele Gssing" (annual Gssing castle play) to
add to Josef Reichls play "Landflucht", was introduced to the audience.

The Womens' Choir of Raabfidisch (Rbafzesi Nmet Asszonykrus) sang German
and Hianzisch folk songs.

MORE ON FANDL NAME (Knigshofer & Schuch)
Fritz writes: Further on Fandl; when I went through my notes from the
Volksfreund newspaper (for another reason), I noted that the issue of October
12, 1901 carried an article about a scam, where a traveling salesman had
forged the signatures of three Lafnitz Valley teachers on the order for an
expensive encyclopedia ("Konversations-Lexikon"). The names of the cheated
(and unsuspecting) teachers were Knigshofer (my great grandfather),
Korntheuer, and Fandl. The teachers had to appear at the court in Szent
Gotthrd to be interrogated about the case. It shows that there was a bearer
of the name Fandl who must have worked as a teacher around 1901 in one of the
villages near Heiligenkreuz.

Albert writes: Sorry, but I have no idea about the meaning of the Fandl name.
Similar names, also quite common in Southern Burgenland, are Jandl and
Tschandl. Since both Jandl and Fandl exist in Grosspetersdorf, one might be a
misspelling of the other. The Tschandl name can be found in Pinkafeld, for
example. Another name that comes to mind is Mandler, common in and around
Stegersbach. In the old days, when the corn was reaped, it was bound together
in units called "Mandl" or "Kornmandl". These stood on the field like small
men, hence the name.

BEHIND THE SCENES OF THE BB (Frank Teklits)
Ed. Note: I'm always pleased when I hear about work like the following. Frank
writes: As you know in release 5.0 of Dr. Dobrovich's text (yes Frank has
revised it 5 times!), I've used the Times New Roman font and none of the
Croatian village names have the unique character inflections typical of the
Croatian alphabet. As an example, the village named Rupisce should in reality
be spelled as Rupice, but I lacked the ability to insert the special
characters into the text until now.

A fellow BB member, Bruce Klemens, has been working diligently on this, & has
forwarded the procedures necessary to use the special Croatian symbols while
retaining the Find, and Find & Replace feature of Word for Windows. I have
forwarded my thanks to Bruce for his assistance, and plan on inserting the
special characters into release 5.1 over the next few weeks. My suggestion is
for you to continue releasing the text as planned until I can complete this
task.

Limitations of Word for Windows prevent this update from being a painless
procedure as this update will take some time because of the number of steps
necessary to incorporate these special characters into the 200+ some Croatian
names identified in the text. I'll keep you appraised of my progress for this
update.

In the meantime, with some excellent effort from Albert Schuch , I've been
able to complete a good draft for two village register listings, namely,
Burgenland to Croatian, and Croatian to Burgenland villages. In each of the
two listings, there are approximately 105 village names for which both
Burgenland & Croatian names are included . I hope to get active tonight at
the FHC, using fiche 6001476 to verify the listings, & complete this effort
prior to initiating the insertion of the special characters. I did want to
update you on Bruce's & Albert's good efforts, as it is another reflection on
the unique strength of the BB.

IS KOSSUTH COUNTY, IOWA - A BURGENLAND ENCLAVE?
Cathy Bourner writes: From the links list in the newsletter, I went to the
MSU Historical Links Archive
(http://www.msstate.edu/archives/history/hungary/shields.html), then to the
Kossuth coat of arms.The web site location isn't as important as the name:
Kossuth. That is the county in Iowa where my Burgenland ancestors settled.

My question: has anyone investigated this? Is there a strong Burgenland
link to settlement in north central Iowa, or is this just a coincidence?
Kossuth County was formed in 1851. From a web search on Kossuth county, I
found information about a "wave of immigration from 1860 to 1900" from
Luxembourg to Algona, Kossuth Co. (Algona is the county seat). I also had
numerous hits on the Burgenland Bunch surname list!

Before I investigate further, I thought I'd check to see if anyone else has
looked into this topic. I kind of wondered why my ancestors choose Iowa to
settle. Could there have possible been others from the Burgenland region
"breaking ground" so to speak? I have found Kossuth County to be one of the
least documented of Iowa's counties--at least on the web and in the
Historical Society's publications.

Ed. Reply: Dr. Walter Dujmovits, author of "Die Amerika Wanderung der
Burgenlnder" and noted authority concerning Burgenland emigration makes no
mention in his book of Iowa being a Burgenland enclave. Many Burgenlanders
did emigrate to Kansas, Minnesota and subsequently the Dakotas in the later
half of the 1800's. Many of these came from northern Burgenland. Since Indian
territories were being reshuffled during this period and government land was
being made available, it's not unlikely that your ancestors could have
drifted into Iowa from those regions . Had there been a large group going
directly to Iowa, I'm sure the records would mention it.

Kossuth, Lajos (Louis), 1802-1894, was of course the Hungarian patriot who
led the revolution of 1848. In April 1849 he became president of the newly
proclaimed republic. He resigned in August when the Austrian government with
Russian aid put down the rebellion with harsh measures (many of the leaders
were executed including Louis Batthyany, a member of the family who had the
Herrschaft of Gssing). Although the dual monarchy emerged a few years later,
Kossuth spent the rest of his life in exile. He came to America in 1851 and
received a tremendous welcome "as the enlightened representative of Hungarian
independence...and advocate of personal freedom." He then made a triumphal
tour of the US. He hoped for US intervention in Hungarian independence. This
was not forth coming and he left in 1852, became active in European politics
and died in Turin, Italy after 42 years of exile. He was hanged in effigy by
the Austrians. It's probable that a handful of his followers, proscribed by
the Austrians, may have emigrated. If so they may have come from other than
the Burgenland area of Hungary. Kossuth was highly admired both in the US and
in the British Empire and his popularity at the time of Iowa's formation may
have caused the county to be named after him. I'd think you could verify this
by investigating further the history of Kossuth Conunty, Iowa.

I'll include this in the next newsletter to see if any of our other members
have any information. Gerry Berghold

A THANK YOU-ORIGINS OF THE BB
Marjorie E. Krell writes: I just have to say, as a newer member of the group,
I am so happy you organized this. I just told my husband at breakfast that I
can NOT even remember how I learned about it! (When I sit down at the
computer, everything turns to magic) Now, would I have ever thought of
searching the Austrian Phone Directory? Probably not! I posted a query
somewhere last night about searching for an Eberau relative, and within a
short time had received a reply to go to that phone directory and I'd find
the names. The one who I know for sure is a descendent of my grandmother's
half brother is listed. I've also had 2 or 3 very wonderful contacts with
other members. I think I was helpful to Bill Rudy in regard to his father's
cousin who died in the German army. Then, Barrie Geosits offered to take some
of my information with her to Austria to pursue a couple of things if time
allows. Thanks again for your efforts.

Ed. Reply: Thanks for the kind words. Finding new contacts and helping them
over the hurdles is what it's all about. While we started with 8 members in
January of 1997 (a few of us met the previous year through postings on AOL's
genealogy bulletin board) we now have 318 members. The magic of computers and
the internet! Almost as good as compound interest.

When we started we would copy our other contacts whenever we sent email. One
said to me "we really are an organization and should have a newsletter"; thus
began the Burgenland Bunch. I've been editing news sheets since grade school.
A little later we set up our homepage and opened a window on the world and
thus allowed internet "Search Engines" to find us. If you search anywhere on
the word "Burgenland", you'll probably find a link to the Burgenland Bunch.
Since then we have placed articles in "Heritage Quest" magazine, the Austrian
newsletter of the "Burgenlandische Gemeinschaft", the Oberwart Zeitung (OZ),
Austrian Radio (ORF) and other publications here and abroad. We also have
links with most major internet genealogy sites including a "gateway" and
posting service with WorldGenWeb and through them to Roots/L. I have a
feeling that many of our members also spread the word via email and through
Austrian- American social clubs. Wishing you success in your search.

DELIGHTFUL LITTLE BURGENLAND TRAVEL BOOK (continued from previous newsletter
and taken from the German-English travel book "Burgenland", authors Pflagner
& Marco, 1970, Frick Verlag, Wien.)

1. (Scene) Way up the Mountain of Calvary in front of the Bergkirche in
Eisenstadt. The Pilgrimage Church of Maria Heimsuchung was built in the years
1715-1772 by the Counts Esterhazy in "Obersberg Eisenstadt. The Mountain of
Calvary, an artificial hill made of hewn stone, was created 1701-1707 by
command of Count-Palatine Paul Esterhazy by the Franciscan lay brother Felix
Nierinck. The Way of the Cross is a narrow path that widens by the Stations
with their Baroque Statues. This "holy mountain" is a peculiar, fantastic
work of art, the 24 Stations of the Cross are, in a way, motionless Baroque
theatre. Joseph Haydn's place of burial from 1820 to 1954 was in a vault
under the church. Count Dr. Paul Esterhazy had a magnificent tomb erected in
1932 in the left track of the Bergkirche, but the reburial of Joseph Haydn
had to be postponed because the Society of Music Friends in Vienna refused to
part with Haydn's head. Not until 1954 was the head brought in solemn
ceremony to Eisenstadt, united with the body and buried in the tomb. Haydn's
last masses were performed for the first time in the Bergkirche. (to be
continued)

AUSTRIAN TRAVEL TIPS (from Fritz Knigshofer)
Fritz replies to some travel questions from new member Alex Tschaar: "There
are some very economic places to rent a car here in the US to be picked up at
arrival, say, at Frankfurt or Munich (or Vienna-Schwechat) airport. The
company I have used most often is Europe by Car. You can also rent from them
for pick-up in Austria, but the rates for pick-up and return in Germany are
better. Call Europe by Car at 1-800-223-1516 or 1-800-637-9037, or
1-212-581-3040. They'll probably send you their booklet to browse and
choose. I don't know if they have a web address. Their actual cars come
from reputed car rentals and are first class.

For your choice of lodging, take a look at
http://www.burgenland-tourism.at/suedbgld/guessing.htm

If you type Olbendorf, it brings up one inn, where a room with breakfast (I
interpret NF to mean night plus Frhstck=breakfast) costs AS180 (about
$15-per person). Breakfasts in Austria are excellent (the taste of the bread
and butter alone are just unmatched anywhere). Check Stegersbach as well,
and any other village in the neighborhood. Please keep in mind you will be
in a region of thermal baths, therefore if you have some money to spend for
health, consider one of these places, like Stegersbach, Therme Loipersdorf,
or Bad Tatzmannsdorf and Blumau (or Bad Gleichenberg) in Styria.

Halbpension (HP) means you also get dinner in the evening, and VP
(Vollpension) means all meals are included in the price. With the price of
the room and breakfast in Olbendorf, you would easily be able to live with
under $50 per day, including some gas costs for the car. However, gas is
very expensive in Europe, three times what it costs here, therefore the trip
from Frankfurt to Burgenland and back would cost you $70 or more each way in
gas costs."
(End of article. Newsletter continued as no. 57A)

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