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Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 59 dtd 15 Junw 1999 (edited)
Date: Sat, 10 Jul 1999 16:13:29 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 59
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(issued biweekly by
June 15, 1999
(all rights reserved)
Share your family history knowledge, it is one way to achieve immortality.

This first section of the 3 section newsletter contains the announcement of a
Burgenland Bunch Change, Burgenland Gemeinschaft News, Batthyany Family and
Gssing Castle, Burgenland Geography, More From the Allentown "Free
Burgenlander" and the first of a new Village Description Series from a New
Hungarian Atlas.

PLEASE READ - BURGENLAND BUNCH CHANGE - PLEASE READ

We are 2 1/2 years old. Like the terrible two of childhood, we are very
active! Membership is over 320 and we now represent most villages in the
Burgenland which sent immigrants to America. Our archives contain over 1200
pages of Burgenland family history. Many members have been able to trace
their Burgenland ancestors for a number of generations and quite a few have
been contacted by current descendants. We are linked to publications,
organizations and web sites here and abroad. A dedicated volunteer staff is
active in bringing you new material. We have a splendid homepage (website)
complete with archives and informational lists. Through the courtesy of
WorldGenWeb, we have a homepage gateway and a bulletin board posting
facility. This costs our membership nothing but interest and cooperation.

It is now time for a change. Due to the size of the group, I can no longer
efficiently distribute newsletters via my AOL email facilities. Effective
with newsletter number 60 or 61, newsletters will be distributed via a list
service provided by Roots Web, the same organization that hosts our WGW
posting board. Only I will have access to the mailing list and changes will
still have to be reported to me via email (as now). It will not be possible
to "subscribe" and "unsubscribe" directly , as is done with some newsletter
lists.

The only differences you will notice will be the omission of those many pages
of "CC" addresses which now show on your email, changes in sender
transmission data (the sender will be BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L. Do not try to
send messages to this address.) and the lack of color (AOL members now enjoy
color email). YOU NEED DO NOTHING, ALL WILL BE DONE FOR YOU!

Burgenland Bunch member Charles Wardell, who brought us the WGW posting
facility, is instrumental in bringing us this new service and he has our many
thanks. Charles is also host of WGW-Austria, the parent host of
WGW-Burgenland.

It is important that you promptly report address changes in order to reduce
the number of undeliverable newsletters. I will not look kindly on those who
continuously have mail returned. LIKEWISE, IF AT ANY TIME YOU NO LONGER READ
THE NEWSLETTERS OR ARE GETTING AN INFORMATION OVERLOAD, PLEASE CONSIDER
DROPPING YOUR SUBSCRIPTION. You can do this by email to ,
message "remove". This will only stop the newsletter, you will still be
listed with us. "Cancel" will cancel the newsletter and your membership
listing. Newsletters may still be read or downloaded from our homepage.
Beginning with Roots Web distribution, they will also be available for
sophisticated archival searches at another site to be announced later.

Newsletter no. 57 included a plea for "removals" from members no longer
interested. I'm perplexed but happy to report that I received only "four" but
naturally wonder if everyone got the message. I thank those four members for
their honesty and cooperation. Most editors usually make a plea for
increasing not decreasing subscribers. I sincerely hope you are all
benefiting from the newsletters and will continue to read them, but being a
realist, I'm sure some recipients find it easier to delete unwanted mail
rather than make the effort to stop a free subscription. If you find yourself
in this category, please do me a great service by sending a "removal". On the
other hand, if you're really serious about Burgenland family history stay
with us, we have great things planned. Gerry Berghold

BURGENLANDISCHE GEMEINSCHAFT NEWS
Page four of the Mar/April 1999 issue contains a full column concerning the
BB. This was written by Albert Schuch under the title "Burgenland Bunch-a
Grand Idea" and is a copy of the article that appeared in OZ in February. Hap
Anderson, Albert and I are mentioned, as is our homepage URL. This provides
some more foreign exposure.

BB members who receive the BG news don't want to miss page 12, lower right.
"Mitglieder im Ausland" (foreign members) -annual dues of $15 are due now.
Don't miss it, you won't get a bill.

The annual BG picnic will be held Sunday July 11, 1999 at the wine museum in
Moschendorf (Rt 56 just east of Gssing and Strem) beginning 1400 hours. If
you're in the Burgenland at that time, why not attend. Introduce yourself to
Dr. Walter Dujmovits and/or Frau Renate Dolmanits as a BB member and join the
BG. You'll be welcome amd maybe meet a cousin or two.

The computer science class of Johann Unger, Hauptschule (high school) Eberau,
has prepared a CD-ROM about the history of Deutsch-Schtzen, Sankt Kathrein,
Edlitz, Hll, Eisenberg, Moschendorf, Bildein, Kroattisch-Ehrensdorf, Gaas,
Winten, Kulm and Eberau. Available from the BG for ATS 100 ($10.00-include
$2.00 for overseas postage). Address of the BG is A-7540 Gssing, Hauptplatz
7, Austria. E-mail address is .

NEW VILLAGE SERIES-THE UPPER LAFNITZ (from Albert Schuch)
This is the third in the series. From: Josef LOIBERSBECK: Das Obere
Lafnitztal. (The Upper Lafnitz Valley.) In: Burgenlndische Heimatbltter
1963-64.

3) Buchschachen
North of Allhau. First mentioned in 1263. According to the Urbarium of 1532,
"Puechschachen" was inhabited by 17 farmers: 2 HALWACHS, SCHAFFNER, GRAT; 1
KURZ, GRASSL, SANDTNER, WURZER, GRADWOHL, GRAFL, GANGL, THR, KRAUTWALD, REH,
HELBRER. Five tenants are also mentioned: RITTER, ULRICH, MURH, Michael KURZ
and Georg WURZER. In 1652 Lutheran Preacher Daniel MUMENIUS, 70 years of age,
is mentioned in Buchschachen. The Urbarium of 1767 counts 67 farmers and 17
Sllner. Farmer names: 9 RITTER, KOCH; 8 SAUHAMMEL; 6 ARTWOHL, URBAUER; 4
HALWACHS, TUBL, BINDER, KICHER; 3 SANTER, EMMRISS, BHM, HAHRER; 2 BENEDEK,
KRAUSS, WOLFGEHER, PILLNHOFER, KURZ, HAGENAUER, POTTENDORFER; 1 TRIBEL,
KOLLER, HBNER, SAMERER, BODENHOFER, OBERHOFER, REITNER, VOLKER, JANI, FANDL,
PETINGER, AUER, HERSCH etc.; Sllner names: 1 BRUNNER, SCHRANK, KLENNER,
HONIGSCHNABEL.

In 1781 the Lutherans joined the parish Allhau. Teachers: Matthias BRUNNER
(until ca. 1820), Michael NIKA (1822; from Unterschtzen); Johann Georg
KNBEL (from Pinkafeld; 1824-34). 120 pupils were counted in 1830. Matthias
HAMMER (1834-37; from Gns); Samuel ESTL (1834-37); Franz PETER (1844-53;
from Eltendorf); Ludwig HUBER (1853-56, from Tolnau); Michael KNBEL
(1857-62; from Pinkafeld). Friedrich BENEDEK (1861-68; from Pinkafeld);
Samuel RITTER (1868-76, a native of Buchschachen); Adolf RCK (1877-1890);
Michael ZIMMERMANN (1890-1924, from Rechnitz). Johann SCHRANZ (1924-34, from
Jormannsdorf), Gustav FISCHL (1934-40, from Knigsdorf); Adolf KLENNER from
Oberschtzen was second teacher from 1913-35. Franz AUMLLER (1940-41),
Hermann HAAS (1941-43, from Litzelsdorf), Johann SCHADEN (1943-44, from
Riedlingsdorf), Dorris PAUER (1944-45), Johann BRUCKNER (1945-46, from
Pinkafeld), Maria PFEILER (1946); 1947- Julius GOGER from Oberschtzen,
second teacher Otto KURZ (1948), also from Oberschtzen.

In 1858 Buchschachen counted 100 farmers and 51 Sllner. Farmer names: 10
SAUHAMMEL; 6 KOCH, KRAUSS, BHM; 5 RITTER, TUBEL; 4 URBAUER, KURZ, BENEDEK,
BINDER; 3 HAGENAUER; 2 KUCHER, WELTLER, GANGL, SANDER, HONIGSCHNABEL,
HALWACHS, KOLLER, ARTWOHL, PAPST, AUER, OBERHOFER, POTTENDORFER; 1 MERT,
KRUTZLER, SCHOBER, GAMAUF, FINK, GROSS, WERTNER, VOLKER, TAUSS, ARTNER,
WOLFGEHER, REITNER, BUNDSCHUH, ARTHOFER, FLECK, EMMRESS, HEINRER, ZISSER,
LATTINGER. Sllner names: 1 REINDL, HEROLD, NIKA, PFERSCHY, PESCHL, FASSL,
GRASSL, RINGBAUER, UIDL etc.

1833: 140 houses, 953 inhabitants; 1900: 193 houses (87 of these with straw
roofs), 1041 inh. (224 Catholics, 816 Lutheran, 1 Reformed); 1961: 153
houses, 617 inh. (597 Germans, 20 gypsies; 85 Catholics, 532 Lutherans; 348
working in agriculture).

SOUTH BURGENLAND HERRSCHAFT-BATTHYANY FAMILY & CASTLE
Ed. Note: Having received two Batthyany family contacts back to back (see
newsletter no. 58), I felt it was time to tell our members about this
historically important, aristocratic, southern Burgenland family. The
following was recently received from Robert Bathiany. << I just came across
the Burgenland Bunch website. I am researching the Hungarian family BATTYANY
which had a castle in Gussing. I would be very interested in exchanging
information with any other Burgenland Bunch members interested in this
family. I have done extensive research in this area, but have a few missing
links which I am trying to close. Robert Bathiany. >>

My reply: While your spellings of the Batthyany name have changed, your
mention of Castle Gssing links you to the southern Burgenland family. I have
no information concerning modern Batthyany family history, but can tell you a
little of their origins, which you may already know. I have also copied
Ladislaus Batthyany (Vienna) if you wish to correspond. Franz Batthyany
(1497-1566; at the time, Ban of Croatia) and his nephew Christoph were given
the Gssing Herrschaft (translates domain or fief) in 1524 (in effect
southern Burgenland below the Pinka river, less a few other minor
Herrschafts) by Hungarian King Lajos (Ludwig) II. The Herrschaft was vacant
at the time, the Ujlaky line, the previous owners, having died out. The gift
was predicated on Batthyany help in resisting the Turkish invasion of
Hungary. King Lajos and most of the Hungarian (Magyar) nobility subsequently
died at the battle of Mohacs (1526). Hungary was then shared between the
Turks and the Habsburgs, gaining partial independence only after the
revolution of 1848, full in 1918. While I have read that Franz Batthyany and
his followers (3000 cavalry and 1000 foot soldiers) were late arriving at the
battle of Mohacs, I'm not sure of the facts. What is certain is that Franz
and his followers survived and Castle Gssing remained a bulwark against
Turkish incursions for almost 200 years. The family consolidated their
holdings over the years and absorbed most of the other south Burgenland
Herrschafts. While many villages were destroyed, I understand the castle was
never taken, even during the Bocskay rebellion when Gssing itself was
burned. It ceased to be of military significance during the reign of Maria
Theresia.

Although the Batthyany are Croatian nobility in origin (I am not sure if they
are of Slav or Magyar descent), they've been considered Hungarian since
arriving in the Burgenland in 1524 and Austrian since 1921. I have little
knowledge of the family prior to or after those dates, except that they had
(data taken from "Stadterhebung Gssing 1973") "a noble holding in Batthyany,
a court in Enying, a castle at Torony, holdings in Ugal, and Szabas (Komitat
Somogy), castle Gereben by Varazdin, castle Kristaloc, Garnica, Mogor and
Ujudvar" plus others. These places are in southern Hungary and northern
Croatia. It's possible they were part of earlier Hungarian (Magyar) holdings
in Croatia. (see Volk an der Grenze ..." People on the Border, Johann
Dobrovich).

They brought many Croatian followers fleeing Turkish invasion, including
minor Croatian nobility, with them both in 1524 and in subsequent years. This
is the reason for the Croatian presence in the Burgenland today (about 12%)
in a region predominantly German (85%). For a brief period the Batthyany were
also Lutheran which encouraged a large movement of German speaking colonists
to migrate into southern Burgenland. The area became a sort of Protestant
refuge during the Counter Reformation. There is still a large group of
Lutherans in the Eltendorf, Kukmirn and Stegersbach areas. I descend from one
such group. Upon reverting to Catholicism, the family (Graf Adam-abt 1638)
built the present Franciscan Cloister and "Maria Heimsuchung" church in
Gssing. There is a family crypt in the church. Later the family married
into the Popel-Lobkowitz, Strattman and Draskovich families and these names
will also be encountered.

I understand there are private family archives in the Batthyany Palace
(Kastely) in Kormend, Hungary, but have no knowledge of what they contain or
whether the Hungarian government has appropriated or returned family property
and historical documents. A book (in German), "Die Kroaten der Herrschaft
Gssing", by Robert Hajszan contains translations of some family papers
(concerning Croatian settlement) from that archive. Perhaps the archive is
available to scholars. From facsimiles of the documents Hajszan translated,
it appears these archives are written in medieval Latin, Serbo-Croatian,
German and Hungarian script. Not something for even the most advanced
genealogist.

Castle Gssing is the focal point of southern Burgenland historical
treasures. It can be seen for miles in every direction. It is among the
oldest in the Burgenland if not in Austria (dating from the 12th Century) and
may even have some Roman antecedents. "Mons Gssing" (mountain) was probably
always used as a watch or signal base. There are better preserved castles,
but none that have more history or significance than Gssing. It is deserving
of special treatment and preservation. It is part of the Batthyany (their
"sitz" for centuries) and Burgenland stories.

While I've dwelt on Franz Batthyany as the first of the line to hold the
Gssing Herrschaft, he is not the only notable. There were many notable
individuals in this family. If I was to pick one it would be Balthasar
(1543-1590), under whose guidance Gssing became a cultural center and a
center of religious tolerance. He was also a scourge of the Turk. I
understand his library is in the Franciscan Cloister and makes up a good
portion of their valuable collection of early books and incunabula. His son
Franz II (1570-1625) who received the Herrschaft of Kormend in 1604 is also
of note as is Adam (1609-1659) for his involvement in religious matters.

I've seen Batthyany genealogical records in the LDS Ancestral File. I don't
know who placed them there. We've had one family contact as stated. I'm not
aware of Batthyany emigration to the US, but you may well be a case in point.
I'd appreciate being brought up to date if you have knowledge of family
emigration and history post WWI. I'd also like to see an ahnentafel of the
main Batthyany line if such is available.

At the present time our newsletters are running installments of an English
translation by one of our members, of "Volk an der Grenze ..." (People on the
Border), the history of the Croatians in Burgenland, written by Johann
Dobrovich. May be of interest to you. I'm also sending you an invitation to
join the Burgenland Bunch via separate email. G. Berghold, Editor Burgenland
Bunch Newsletter

AUSTRIAN GEOGRAPHY - GEMEINDEN AND BEZIRKS (DISTRICTS)
Geographical accuracy is essential to genealogical research. There are many
cities and villages with the same names. This is doubly true of the Germanic
regions. In the same way that we identify American locales by name, county
and state, so too should we identify Austrian locales by name, bezirk and
province. Some prefer to translate "Bezirk" as county instead of district and
"Province" as state. My personal preference is to use district and province.
There is another term much in use in Austria which really has no American
counterpart-it is the term "Gemeinde" or community. Within the "Gemeinde" we
find many smaller villages which have lost their administrative identity in
the same way that smaller postal "villages" in the US get absorbed by
expanding urban areas, the so-called "suburbs", in German sometimes referred
to as "ausser stadt" (outer city). An example is Gssing which has absorbed
Rosenberg and Langzeil. If you look for those names in a village listing you
won't find them. Yet your immigrant ancestor will say he came from Rosenberg!
His uncle had a vineyard in Langzeil! You know, (ach, now we have it) bei
Gssing in das Sd Burgenland!

There is another term which can cause confusion-this is "Ortsteile"=parts of
the place. Ortsteile include villages which are administered partly or
completely by another such as Neuseidl, Limbach and Eisenhttl administered
from Kukmirn. Look for them in the Kirsner and Peternell book and you won't
find them in the Gemeinden listing. You will find them as "Ortsteille" in the
listing of "Die Gemeinden und Ihre Ortsteille". To further confuse the issue,
local politics and changing times can often cause a village to become more or
less independent. They may be mentioned in one book or publication as
independent and ignored a few years later. While Bezirk Gssing covers 26
Gemeinden (including Stadt Gssing), the Gemeinden cover another 28
Ortsteile, making 53 villages and one stadt exclusive of the absorbed
villages.

Another Austrian (and German) practice is to define similar villages by the
rivers, river valleys or other unique places in which they are located. Thus
we have Heiligenkreuz im Lafnitztal (Heiligenkreuz in the valley of the
Lafnitz River), Mannersdorf an den Rabnitz (Mannersdorf on the Rabnitz River)
and Podersdorf am See (Podersdorf on the Lake). There are many others.

When speaking of the importance of geography, I like to tell the following
story: Someone once asked me if I knew anything about a village in Austria.
He said it was his immigrant ancestor's village, mentioned in some papers he
had inherited and, while he said he didn't have a good map, he found a place
by that name just outside a major Austrian city. He was pretty sure it was
the correct place because he found people there with his family name (a
common one) and in viewing the church records, while he hadn't found the
correct birth date of his ancestor, he had found one with the same name that
was so close it had to be his. He also found some, but not all, siblings with
the correct names! As a result he spent much time gathering "family" data
from that village and added it to his computer files. It was only when he
found another village of the same name and again a concentration of his
family name that he began to have doubts,. When he searched those records, he
found "exact" birth date and sibling matches. Further study proved his
original "find" to be invalid. It can happen, particularly with common names.
Most Americans have little knowledge of foreign geography. Not much American,
much less European geography is being taught in our schools. You should read
some of the queries I get.

When looking for that village of origin, be sure you are aware of other
places with the same name. Don't confuse the Heiligenkreuz in the Vienna
Woods (bei Baden) with the one along the Hungarian border (im Lafnitztal).
Get yourself a good map (1:200,000 or less) and use it. Also familiarize
yourself with a gazetteer of the place and time period you are researching
(the LDS has them in their location index). At least look at the village
listing in the Austrian phonebook.

Like wise, we should pay attention to Hungarian geography, being aware of
Hungarian names, former Megye (county) and possibly even Komitat (Gemeinde),
particularly if you are working in the pre 1921 period.

In my computer files I show birth place as Heiligenkreuz, Burgenland,
Austria but the notes for the first entry with this village also say, "in the
southern Burgenland, Bezirk of Jennersdorf with the full name of
Heiligenkreuz im Lafnitztal, known as Rabakeresztur, Vas Megye (Komitat
Eisenburg), Hungary pre 1921. Includes Poppendorf. An historical description
(like Leser's) follows that note.

The seven Burgenland "Bezirks", north to south are Neusiedl am See (28
Gemeinden-Andau to Zurndorf), Eisenstadt (24 Gemeinden-Breitenbrunn to
Zillingtal), Mattersburg (19 Gemeinden-Antau to Zemendorf-Stttera),
Oberpullendorf (28 Gemeinden-Deutschkreutz to Weppersdorf), Oberwart (31
Gemeinden-Bad Tatzmannsdorf to Wolfau), Gssing (26 Gemeinden-Bocksdorf to
Wrtherberg), and Jennersdorf (12 Gemeinden-Deutsch Kaltenbrunn to
Weichselbaum). In addition there are the free cities of Rust and Eisenstadt.
That's a total of 170 villages and cities although we know there are about
400. The difference are mainly Ortsteile. See what I mean? Do you know the
Bezirks and Gemeinden for your villages?

MORE FROM ALLENTOWN, PA ETHNIC NEWSPAPERS (from Albert Schuch)
(Ed. note: if anyone knows of a source of these newspapers or the location of
their archives, please advise). On 22 Nov 1931, the Oberwarter
Sonntags-Zeitung reported the death of Julius BODISCH, publisher of the
"Allentown Friedensbote". The newspaper was in existence for about 9 years.

>From the weekly "Der Freie Burgenlnder":
17 May 1925- Poppendorf: Donations from America for the Lutheran school;
collectors in New Britain were Franz BERGHOLD and Josef MIRTH (98 Dollars)

15 Jan 1928- Poppendorf: Fr eine evangelische Schule in Poppendorf wurde vom
Landsmann Josef BERGHOLD, der in Allentown lebt, eine Sammlung eingeleitet,
die 32 Dollar ergab, das sind 225 Schilling. [= For a Lutheran school in
Poppendorf our countryman Josef BERGHOLD in Allentown collected 32 Dollars,
that is 225 Schilling.]

also from 15 Jan 1928- Josef BODER collected 20 Dollars for the Fire Brigade
of Heiligenkreuz, donators were: 2 D(ollars): Frank SCHUSTER; 1 D: Johann
BERGHOLD, Josef BODER, Cilly GAAL, Gisela KROPF, Josef NIKLES, Josef
OBERECKER, Alois PFEIFFER, Franz PFEIFFER, Lina PIEBER, Karl SCHREI, Josef
SCHNIRLEIN, Josef SCHWARTZ, Therese URBAN, Frank WAGNER; 50 C: Therese HEBER,
Eduard RESZLER, Josef RESZLER, Therese SCHREINER, Johann ZEGLOWITSCH, Josef
ZWICKL; 25 C: Anna KLINE, Rudolf KROPF, Eduard RESZLER, Johann SIMITZ, Mary
STRANSEL. Alle from Coplay and Allentown.

NEW HUNGARIAN ATLAS DESCRIBES VILLAGES (from Fritz Knigshofer)
Fritz writes: During my recent trip to Budapest, I found some new books on
(present-day) Hungarian counties which I had not seen before. This is a
series titled "[county name] Atlas" and contains maps of all major
settlements in the county as well as brief descriptions of them in three
languages (Hungarian, English and German). I puchased the volumes for Vas,
Moson - Sopron-Gyr, and Somogy. The volume for Vas county came out in 1997.
The reason I'm writing this message, besides the information about this new
series, is to convey to you the English text (with my small corrections)
about Szent Pterfa.

Taken from Vas Megye Teleplseinek Atlasza, Peter Gndcs, publisher, 1997,
published by HISZI-MAP Kft., 5700 Gyula, Corvin utca 3, Tel/Fax:
+36-66-463610, 463323, Hungary. All rights reserved. Reprinted by permission.
Copies available in Hungary for 2,500 Forints."

SZENT PETERFA
"The settlement is situated along the Pinka stream and now inhabited mainly
by Croats. It was first recorded in 1221. The village owes its name to the
titular saint of the parish church. This church preserves the architectural
traits of consecutive periods. The baptismal fountain is Romanesque, while
most of the other architectural features originated in the second half of the
15th century, rendering St. Peter's church one of the most significant relics
of West Transdanubia's "brickwork Gothic" style. The village has a border
station to Austria. In 1923, after the Trianon Peace Treaty, the settlement
was awarded the title of "The Most Loyal
Hungarian Village" as the population had voted to return to Hungary. The
current population is 1,066."
(Newsletter continued as No. 59A)

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