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From: <>
Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 62 dtd 15 Aug 1999
Date: Sun, 15 Aug 1999 09:59:23 EDT


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 62
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(issued biweekly by
August 15, 1999
(all rights reserved)

Many a family tree needs pruning

Note to recipients. If you don't want to receive Burgenland Bunch
newsletters, send email to with message "remove". ("Cancel"
will cancel membership, homepage listings and mail.) To join, see our
homepage. We can't help with non-Burgenland family history. Comments and
articles are appreciated. This first section of the 3 section newsletter
contains data on the Village of Loipersdorf, Latin Names of Hungarian
Counties (Megye), Burgenland Genealogy Suggestions, Pomogy/Pamhagen Site
Updated, Zanegg Book, Member Correspondence and the Hungarian Border Villages
of Und, gfalva, & Jnossomorja.

UPPER LAFNITZ VILLAGES (from Albert Schuch)
This is the fifth in the series. From: Josef LOIBERSBECK: Das Obere
Lafnitztal. (The Upper Lafnitz Valley.) In: Burgenlndische Heimatbltter
1963-64.

5) Loipersdorf
First mentioned in 1334 as Lipotfalva. Urbarium of 1532 shows 4 deserted
farms and 12 existing farms. Farmer names: 2 HALWACHS; 1 WELZL, BACH, GLSL,
LACKNER, GLASER, TRAPP, RIPPEL, BEHEIM, GSTL, LEITGEB. As for the 4 deserted
farms, the owner-names of two of them are still known (first names only).
Also a mill owned by one WELTZER. In 1652, when the village was mortgaged to
the Styrian RINDSMAUL family, 50 farmers and 7 dwellers were counted. Farmer
names: 9 KOCH; 8 HALWACHS; 4 FARKASCH; 3 WEBER, LECHNER, KRUTZLER; 2
RINGBAUER, GROSZBAUER, WELTLER, BHM, BINDER; 1 HEINZLER, LUITTN, KUCHER,
WEISSENBERGER, ZINKL, WAGENHOFER, PORN, MGL, WINKL, SCHEBINGER. Additional
dweller names: LACKNER, KRAUS.

The Urbarium of 1767 counts 71 farmers and 11 dwellers. Farmer names are: 13
LEHNER; 8 KOCH; 7 BHM; 4 KRUTZLER, HALWACHS; 3 WELTLER; 2 KAPPEL, SCHOBER,
GROSSBAUER, MLLNER; 1 RINGBAUER, SCHEBINGER, RUIDER, WEBER, PHL,
POGLIDISCH, HAHRER, HOFER, WILDNER, GAMAUF, HATZL, LIND, HAPPEL,
WEISSENBERGER, POSCH, GLATZHOFER, NADLER, FARKASCH, MAGL, TRIEBAUMER, HUTTER,
HEINBAUER, SCHRANZ, BINDER. Additional dweller names: KRAUS, ZISSER, EDERER,
TRINKL and KLENNER.

Lutherans belong to parish Allhau since 1781. Lutheran teachers: Johann Georg
GOGER (1822), Gottlieb ZUNFT (1823), Johann NIKA (1829-67, teacher's son from
Unterschtzen), his nephew Alexander NIKA (1867-72), Matthias KARNER
(1872-74, from Wolfau), Michael ZETTER (1874-1909, from Unterschtzen); Ernst
POLSTER (1910-39, from Oberschtzen)- In 1860 we find 70 farmers and 31
dwellers. Farmer names: 10 LEHNER; 5 BHM; 4 KOCH, WELTLER, HALWACHS,
RINGBAUER; 3 SCHOBER, GROSSBAUER, KRUTZLER; 2 HAIDBAUER, WIEDNER, GAMAUF,
WEISSENBERGER, HATZL, TRIEBAUMER; 1 KURZ, REINPRECHT, WEBER, PLL, URBAUER,
MLLNER, SCHMIED, OBERHOFER, KAINZ, MUSSER, SCHIEBINGER, NADLER, ZISSER,
RITTER, BINDER, HUTTER, WOPPEL, FASSL.

Dwellers: 6 LEHNER; 3 KOCH, HALWACHS, HATZL; 1 KRAUSS, MAIER, ZAPFL,
PFEFFER, KRUTZLER, SUPPER, BHM, WEBER, TRIEBAUMER, KIRNBAUER, DAMPF, PFIFF,
GLATZ, RITTER, HAGENAUER, NOWAK.

Catholic school built in 1912. First teacher there was Josef Ernst JAHRMANN
from Pinkafeld. Since WW 2 public school for both confessions, several
teacher changes during the war; form 1945 until ? Josef GARGER was teacher.
Statistical data: 1842/43: 257 Catholics, 440 Lutherans; 1890: 137 houses,
842 inhabitants; 1934: 172 houses, 896 inh. (incl. 110 gypsies); 1961: 170
houses, 771 inhabitants

LATIN NAMES OF HUNGARIAN COUNTIES (courtesy Joe Jarfas, Tom Venetianer
<> and )

Joe Jarfas writes: Hi Gerry, the other day Tom, below, put up a question
regarding the Latin county names for all of Hungary. A couple of days later
he himself answered it. Quite a find. BB members should be able to use these.
(Ed. Note: Tom is researching Transylvania, so is not a member of our group.
If you are also researching that area, you may wish to contact him.)

Resent-From:
From: Tom Venetianer <>
Hello Joseph and all, I asked and I reply :-). Here is the full list of Latin
county (megye) names. County in Latin is "cottus" (abbreviated c.), thus
usually the full Latin name of a county would be "cottus something_ensis"
(with some very few exceptions). A piece of cake! As a bonus you will find an
URL address for each "megye" which if visited will deliver a nice map of that
specific county as it existed in year 1800. Wonderful resource for folks
looking for really old villages. Last but not least, the Slovak and German
names are also mentioned (when known). The sequence of names is: Hungarian,
Latin, Slovak and German. When the Slovak name is missing then two - - denote
the void. I hope you find this useful, regards Tom
PS: if the accents do not show, blame the server :)
Abaj - c. Abaujvr
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a41.htm
Arad - c. Aradiensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a50.htm
rva- c. Arviensis - Orava
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a9.htm
Baranya - c. Baranyiensis - Baranince
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a33.htm
Bars - c. Barsiensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a13.htm
Bcs - c. Bacsiensis - - Baatsch
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a19.htm
Bereg - c. Beregniensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a39.htm
Bks - c. Bks - - Bekesch
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a51.htm
Bihar - c. Bihariensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a52.htm
Borsod - c. Borsodiensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a43.htm
Csand - c. Csand
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a49.htm
Csongrd - c. Csongrd
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a45.htm
Esztergom - c. Striganiensis - Strihom - Gran
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a16.htm
Fejr - c. Albensis - - Stuhlweisser
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a30.htm
Gmr (& Kishont) - c. Gmriensis - Gemer
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a40.htm
Gyr - c Jauriniensis - - Raab
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a28.htm
Heves & Szolnok - c. Heves et Szolnok
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a44.htm
Hont - c. Hontensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a14.htm
Komrom - c. Comaromiensis - Komrno - Kamarun or Komorn
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a29.htm
Krass - c. Krasso
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a46.htm
Lipt - c. Liptoviensis - Liptov - Liptau
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a10.htm
Maramaros - c. Marmarus - - Marmarosch
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a57.htm
Moson - c. Mosoniensis - - Miesenburg
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a20.htm
Ngrd - c. Neogradiensis - Nowgrad - Neograd or Nauraden
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a15.htm
Nyitra - c. Nitriensis - Nitra - Neutra
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a6.htm
Pest - c. Pestiensis - Budapest - Budapest
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a17.htm
Pilis & Solt - c. Pilisensis et Solthensis - Pilis a Solt - Pilisch und
Scholth
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a18.htm
Pozsony - c. Posoniensis - Bratislava - Pressburg
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a4.htm
Sros - c. Sarosiensis - Saris - Scharosch
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a35.htm
Somogy - c. Smeghiensis - - Schomod
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a32.htm
Sopron - c. Soproniensis - Sopron - Odiburg or denburg
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a21.htm
Szabolcs - c. Szabolcs
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a54.htm
Zala - c. Szaladiensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a24.htm
Szatmr - c. Szathmariensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a55.htm
Szepes - c. Scepusiensis - Spis - Zipser
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a34.htm
Temes - c. Temesiensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a47.htm
Tolna - c. Tolnensis - - Tolnau
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a31.htm
Torontl - c. Torontal
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a48.htm
Torna - c. Tornansis - Turna - Tornau
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a42.htm
Trencsn - c. Trencsin - Trencin -Trentsin or Trenschin
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a8.htm
Turc - c. Thurotziensis - Martin
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a11.htm
Ugocha - c. Ugocsiensis
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a56.htm
Ung - c. Ungvr - Uzhorod - Ungwar
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a38.htm
Vas - c. Castriferrei - - Eisenburger
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a22.htm
Veszprm - c. Veszprim - Vesprim - Wesprim
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a27.htm
Zempln - c. Zempliniensis - Zemplin - Semplin
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a36.htm
Zlyom - c. Zoliensis - - Altsohl or Sohl
http://www.akm.externet.hu/km/terkep/tkp-a12.htm


GENEALOGY SUGGESTIONS PECULIAR TO THE BURGENLAND
Some of what I'm going to say is pretty obvious and can apply to genealogy in
other places. I have also mentioned some of it in previous newsletters, but
Burgenland family history does require special treatment and I still get a
lot of questions pertaining to the following.

Sooner or later we buy genealogy software and sit down and begin to fill in
the blanks. If you're like me you never read the manual. They never seem to
answer our immediate "what should I do?" questions anyway. I once read an
article in Heritage Quest magazine in which one author wondered if she was
"doing genealogy or playing computer". When we only used paper to record our
data, it was simple. You filled in family group sheets and filed notes and
papers behind them. Now you must learn and follow a certain procedure, albeit
the end products are far superior. Computer genealogy is here to stay
however, so let's look at some of the usual problem questions and my
suggestions:

Names-what to use?
Given Names- I use names as found, spelled as found except for the
immigrants. Explain variations in the notes. However, if your immigrant
grandfather named Alois Mihaly Sorger was called Louis in America, show his
name as Sorger, Louis, Alois, Mihaly. It should be obvious that Alois isn't a
middle name. Most software packages provide for at least four names. Alois'
name undoubtedly appears on his more important "American" legal documents
(including death certificate) as "Louis". If you use "Alois", you'll be
giving someone a problem (particularly with a computer search). Same with
female names or diminutives. If Franciska Langasch became Fannie Langash
upon emigration and was buried under that name, show her as Langash, Fannie
Franciska but explain that spelling variation of Langash in the notes. Her
father should remain as Langasch, Aemilianus (Emil).

Surnames- same as above. Use as found, spelled as found. Explain in notes or
show the variation as a parenthetical name (be careful, some systems may not
allow) or as given name 2 or 3, or 4. I prefer to use names spelled as found.
Most are so close that they are obvious. Berghold- Bergholde-Bergholt or
Nikles-Niklesz or Langash-Langasch.

Spouse Surnames (not known). Use given name with spouse surname in
parentheses. Like (Berghold), Elisabetha. If location is not known, use
spouse's location explained in notes. She will probably be an end of line
individual anyway and thus suspect.

End-of-line (no parents) Names- you don't know the parents, but you do have
some clue as to siblings. maybe they resided in the same house or were
identified as such as godparents, witnesses etc. What to do? Give them at
least a father, name "Unknown Surname" or Same Given Name (first child often
named after parent), with a (?) Surname. Berghold, Michael?. Set his age at
"abt 25 years less" than oldest end of line child. Maybe you have a mother's
surname only, use it and do the same for the other data. Use the location
(village) of the last child. Place the clued siblings in the same family
group sheet. Use notes to explain the fictitious nature of the end of line
data. All educated guestimates, but they do tell you or your descendants
where to start. Too often we leave them without a clue. In my genealogy, all
end of line individuals are noted as "suspect" and "educated guesses". I
carry that "end-of-line" data with me as a report in my research. Never, ever
file away a clue without noting it in your end of line notes.

Dates?
Dates- use abt (about), aft (after) bef (before) when full date is not known
or when only "year" is known.. This has become pretty general usage. It
provides an all important time frame when the data is removed from the
genealogical sequence. (are you talking 1800's or 1900's?) It also means that
you have some clue as to the proper date. Remember that the age (years) at
death will not always give you a correct birth year, so "abt" is called for
in that situation also.

Locations-what to use?
Locations (birth, death)- here we can really go astray. Language, county,
country? Two suggestions, equally good. (1) Use today's names explaining in
the first occurence the previous names like "Poppendorf, Bezirk Jennersdorf,
Burgenland, Austria" pre 1921 was Patafalva, St. Gotthard, Vas megye,
Hungary, or use names as found (Hungarian pre 1921), Austrian post 1921.
Explain in notes for first use.
Locations (marriage, baptism, burial)- here the church name and location is
all important. This is where the records (and/or graves) will be found! If
you know the church name use it followed by a good location. "Maria
Heimsuchung", Gssing, Burgenland, Austria (again follow whatever suggestion
you adopted previously). Likewise for cemetery "St. Jakob", Gssing,
Burgenland, Austria.

I've found that LDS publications offer the best suggestions , when faced with
decisions as to what to do. Their approach to genealogical methods and
procedures have become pretty well standard. (Also part of their PAF manual.)

POMOGY/PAMHAGEN SITE UPDATED (from Gene Andert)

Good day Pamhagen, Austria and Andert researchers. I have updated my web
site on the ANDERT, MUTH, UNGER and FLEISCHHAKER families of Pomogy, Hungary.
I've added information covering the years from 1826 to 1895. The
information includes the Husband and Wife (marriage date, if available, from
the microfilm) and the Children associated with each of the families. If
there was a marriage record, I've also noted the parents of the bride and
the groom. On the data for 1865 to 1895, I've included the House Number of
the new born children. There is information on 201 families in this data
transcribed from 3 LDS microfilms: 0700897, 0700898 and 0700899

In addition to the four surnames I've selected to study, there are many, many
more surnames listed as spouses and parents of individuals. I've added an
everyname index to help the navigation through the data. The four surnames
were chosen because the represent the four surnames of the parents of my
immigrant ancestors, Michael Andert and Maria Unger.

I've also included at this site another page I created with information on
Pamhagen. Including maps and historic information extracted from the
Burgenland Bunch newsletters. There are links also to the genconnect boards
for Andert, Muth and Unger.Here is the address of the
site: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~andert/pomogfamilies.htm
Enjoy.Gene Andert, Andert Family, http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~andert/;


ZANEGG (MOSONSZOLNOK) BOOK (from Albert Schuch)
Mr. Lunzer also showed me a great book called "Familienbuch Zanegg
(Mosonszolnok)", compiled by Matthias Brasch and Matthias Kohlmann. It is
Vol. 49 of the "Schriftenreihe zur donauschwbischen Herkunftsforschung" and
contains conicise transscriptions of church records for 1685-1900 for this
village. Can be ordered from Matthias Brasch, Fuchsweg 9, D-71603
Sindelfingen, Germany. But I don't know the price. I wish I had ancestors in
Zanegg!

SOME MEMBER CORRESPONDENCE
Hi Gerald: This is a THANK YOU note that I should have sent to you and the
B-B Group a long time ago. I joined the B-B Genealogy group about a year or
so ago. Looking for my G-Grandfather Wenzel Leier. Dale Knebel and Norm
Pihale put me on the right track. As it now turns out it is a very small
world as both Norm and Dale are in the lineage of our family tree. I should
go in and change the surname listing as I now found out through Dale and Norm
that my G-Grandparents had a spelling change in our last name. I was also
able to find this information in LDS records. From the B-B posting, a Leurer
in Regina Saskatchewan, Canada contacted Norm and me. With the information
that I had I was able to give them data on his G-Grandfather which also ties
back to our family. Again many thanks to the B-B Genealogy Group. Dallas Leier

MORE HUNGARIAN BORDER VILLAGES FROM GYOR-MOSON-SOPRON COUNTY (from Hizi
Atlas, furnished by Fritz Knigshofer with the publisher's permission; atlas
availability is covered in newsletter no.60).

Und. According to some opinions, the village was named after one of the
leaders of the seven original Hungarian tribes. It was first mentioned in
documents in 1225. Following damage by the Tatar troops, Croats from around
Zagreb settled here. As "Ond," the village aquired market town status from
1408. It was owned by the Ostffy family, later by the Poky family. The
village acquired the rights to hold country-wide markets in the 18th century.
After the village was destroyed by a huge fire, it was rebuilt on a new
hilly site. Today, it has a population of 392. Popular traditions are kept
alive, and pupils at school are also taught in their Croation mother tongue.
[German name was Undten]

gfalva. The village was part of the Dg domain. In 1195, it was acquired
by the Cistercian order. In the 13th century, the village became called
Agendorf by its German settlers. Until the 19th century, Agendorf was a serf
village ["Frondorf"] for Sopron. The mine in Brennberg was opened in 1785,
providing employment for many inhabitants. In 1906, the name of the village
was changed to gfalva. Today, it has a population of 1,947, and good public
services and facilities.

Jnossomorja. Was established in 1970 by uniting the three villages of
Mosonszentjnos, Mosonszentpter, and Pusztasomorja. The names of these
villages were first mentioned in documents of the 13th century when Tatar
troops killed the Hungarian and Pecheneg frontier guards, and Germans
subsequently settled the villages. Szent-Jnos and Szent-Pter were owned by
the castle of vr, while Somorja was always in the possession of Hungarian
land owners. The area was devastated and burned down by Turkish troops, so
German colonists and Hungarians from Csallkz settled here. During
relocation in 1946, the two German inhabited villages were nearly
depopulated, and were resettled by Hungarians from the Great Plains and again
from Csallkz. Besides agriculture, industry continues to grow. The Roman
catholic church in Mosonszentpter stands on fundaments dating to the days of
the Roman Empire. It has been declared a historic monument. There are
several German farm houses built in the Baroque style which have also been
declared historic monuments. The combined town has a population of 6,157.
[The German name of Pusztasomorja was Wstsommerein.]
(End of first section; newsletter continues as no. 62A)



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