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Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 74 dtd 15 Feb. 2000
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2000 09:30:29 EST


THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 74
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(issued biweekly by
February 15, 2000
(all rights reserved)

"Seldom (do) three descents continue good." -Dryden: The Wife of Bath: Her
Tale


Note to recipients. If you don't want to receive Burgenland Bunch
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appreciated. Please add your name to email, otherwise we must search four
large membership lists. Staff and web site addresses are listed at the end of
each newsletter section "B". This first section of the 3 section newsletter
contains data on the northern Village of Tadten, the Obituary of Ladislaus
Esterhazy, Comments on the Batthyany Crypt in Güssing, A Coffee Shop in NY, A
Letter About the South Bend, IN Enclave, A New Member's Lament, a Request for
Descendant Information and A New Rudersdorf Bankerlsitzler.


VILLAGE OF TADTEN (from Albert Schuch)

Tadten
------
(source: Josef Loibersbeck: Am Waasen. In: Volk und Heimat 1966, # 10-13;
summarized and translated by Albert Schuch, February 2000)

First mentioned in a document dated 1250, when King Andreas II ruled Hungary:
The priest of "Tetuna" donated a vineyard to the Abbey of Csorna. In the
centuries to come, the village would be named Tetun, Theten, Taton and
Tétény. The origin of the village name is in dispute: Hungarian researchers
say it is a Hungarian name, whereas German researchers say it is a German
name. (A typical situation for village names in border regions.)

In 1391 and 1399 the nobles of Tadten sold parts of their property to Johann
KESSLER, a German knight from Hamburg, who had come to Hungary to serve in
King Sigismund's army. Tadten seems to have remained in the hands of members
of the lesser aristocracy throughout the 16th and 17th centuries. Tadten had
its "share" of the Turkish sieges of Vienna (1529 and 1683) and of the
Bocskay rebellion (1605-06), when parts of the village were destroyed.

Lutheran preachers were active from 1596 until 1674: Johann PERICH (1596),
Peter VODORITS (1600, from St. Niklas), Michael SZEREDI (1612), Thomas
SZEREDI (1631), Georg LAZIUS (1640), Georg BOGNÁR (1642), Georg PALLA VON
TURÓCZ (1653-59), Stefan HORETZKY (1670-72) and Andreas SÁROSY (1672-74,
former teacher in Güns). When the Lutheran Bishop Gregor MUZSAY inspected the
parish in 1653, the preacher was already old. The farmers who were present at
this inspection were named FALLER, FÉNYES, ANDA, UZSORÁS, GAZDAG, HATOS etc.
(apart from Faller all Hungarian names). Martin MARTINIDES was teacher. The
inhabitants were mostly Hungarian Lutherans, only a few German and Croatian
Catholics.

A catholic ecclesiastical inspection of 1659 gives the same picture. Another
one from 1680 reports that a Francisan Father from Frauenkirchen serves as
priest, and Georg VENUS (FÉNYES) is teacher, who has just converted to
catholicism. Another inspection of 1693 says that the village is owned by
Count Franz Esterházy, Paul Bezerédy, Sigismund Svastich (Schostik) and Peter
Balog. Of 650 inhabitants 510 are still Lutherans. The church is said to have
been damaged and looted by the Turks in 1683.

Around 1700 Prince Paul Esterházy took control of the village and
counter-reformation started, like everywhere on his properties. The
ecclesiastical inspection of 1713 names Johann HÉDERVÁRY (65 y) as priest,
and Georg KLEMENS
(25 y) as teacher.

Church records start in 1712. Surnames mentioned there 1712-1760: Hungarian
names like: SZALAY, SEREGÉLY, LENDVAY, FEJES, MOLNÁR, POLGÁR, EÖZSI, HATOS,
HORVÁT, HARASZTI, GRÁTZÓ, NÉMET, SZIJJÁRTÓ, FARKAS, KOPPI (KAPI), ÁRPÁS,
GARAI, SZABÓ, MADARÁSZ, EPERJES, KÜMÉHES (KÖMIVES), CSUNYI, WENES (FÉNYES),
LAPINCS, BALOG, SÁNTA, SZÁK, KRAJZÁR, NAGY, VARGA, BALÁZS, RÁKÓCZI, ESSÖ,
BORS, HÖVE, GULÁS, BUJTÁS, KOMP, PLÓSI, LAKI, KÁNTOR, HUSZAR, GYÖRIG,
CSONTOS. German names like: HUMMER, MOIK, FÄHNRICH, PILLER, EHMER, PESSL,
WALTER, PÖLTZER, KRAIS, LANG, BRASCH, PRETLER, PRETALLER, PILLER, PELTZMANN,
EBNER, HÄCK, SCHACK, WERL, MEIDINGER, SCHNEIDER, SATTLER, MÄDL, HERZOG,
LEHRNER, GRASS, MACHERL, TEHET, KOHLNBERGER, SCHADEN, MITTENÄCKER, KAPELLER,
PAAR, POTZ, NÄGLER, ZORN, GRASSL, ZIMMERMANN, MOLLER, SCHUSTER, FISCHER,
HALBAUER, WEISS, STAUDINGER, WAGNER, THELL, HAUPTMANN, LIEBMANN, ZWICKL,
SEIBART, KUGLER, GATTINGER, UNGER. Croatian names like: HUSSOVITSCH,
BURITSCH, KOLLOWITSCH, TURPAK, GOLDENITSCH, PAUKOWITSCH (PALKOWITSCH),
WUSCHITSCH. Gypsies' names like: LÁZÁR, PETRUS, VÖRÖS, TÓKÖZI.

18th century Catholic priests after Johann Héderváry: Johann Gabriel KOLLER
(1718-20), Josef LIEBEL (1720-38), Josef DIAKOVITS (1739-43), Georg MAIER
(1743-51), Georg RAAB (1751-53), Franz REICHARDT (1753-93), Franz RAFFEL
(1794-1846, died 84 y old after 51 y of service).

18th century teachers: Franz HORVATH (1718-20, married), Stefan BOROS
(1721-28, married with Helene, Maria SEMLER), Michael CHECH (1734, married),
Georg ENDRÉDI (1748), Stefan KNAUSS (1750, married with Elisabeth HARASZTI),
Paul BOKOR (1752, married with Elisabeth SCHNEIDER), Josef STUPPACHER
(1765-68, married), Josef Michael PLEININGER (1777-94, married with Maria
GLATZ), Jakob MAIER (1792, married with Therese STUPPACHER), Jakob SZABADOS
(1794-99, married).

The church records also mention the names of Prince Esterházy's local estate
managers: DOMSCHITZ (1712), PINTER (1736), HAISSAN (1754), KRAMMER (1763),
RIEDL (1792), Michael SEREGÉLY (1793).

Composer Joseph HAYDN's g-grandfather Kaspar HAYDN was born in Tadten ca.
1630. In 1740 another member of this family, Michael HAYDN, was "Richter"
(equivalent of a mayor, but not exactly the same) of Tadten.

In 1786 the Lutherans of Tadten tried to establish a parish, but it turned
out to be too small, so they became a part of Gols parish soon.

19th and 20th century Catholic priests: Josef KUNTZ (1846-48), Heinrich DUSAR
(1848-81), Josef BEHOFSICH (1881-1909), Johann KUCHER (1909-15), Johann
FLICKER (1915-47), Josef BALLA (1947-?, from Unterschützen). Until 1802 Andau
was a part of Tadten parish.

Teachers: Georg STUPPACHER (1806), Josef WAITZ (1812), Florian KLAUSS
(1820-29), Franz SMOLIK (1822, assistant teacher), Peter SCHÖLL (1835-58,
married with Anna SCHEDL), Georg KRESSNER (ca. 1845, assistant teacher,
married with Elisabeth PINTER), Gabriel SCHÖLL (1856-58), Michael SCHÖLL
(1873-80), Karl NADHERA (1882-88, married), Julius SCHMAL (1888-1927, from
Steinamanger), Michael MOLLAY (1927-39, from Oggau, son in law of his
predecessor), Simon ROTH (1945-46), Josef MOTAL (1949-?)

The church records mention the merchant Leopold MAUTNER in and after 1844,
and the master baker Ferdinand BRUNNER starting from 1872. The Esterházy
estate was mortgaged to one Ernst GAUPMANN in 1850.

Statistical data: 1720: 36 farmers and 21 Söllner. By nationality: 22
Hungarians, 30 Germans, 5 Croats; 1833: 146 houses, 810 inhabitants; 1900:
168 houses, 1248 inh. (172 Hungarians, 1076 Germans; by religion: 1125
Catholics, 100 Lutherans, 23 Jews); 1934: 197 houses, 1548 inh. (1422
Germans, 125 Hungarians, 1 Croat; by religion: 1430 Cath., 111 Luth., 7 Jews).



DR. LADISLAUS (LÁSZLÓ) ESTERHÁZY 1905-2000 (from Albert Schuch)
(Ed. Note: In studying Burgenland History, I've developed a great deal of
respect for the Esterhazy and Batthyany familes. As the prime aristocrats of
the Burgenland area from the 16th to the 20th centuries, they more than
anyone else determined the conditions under which our ancestors lived. In a
period when the European peasants' yoke was a heavy one, I feel these two
families must be noted for their general tolerance and good works.)

On January 15, 2000 Dr. Ladislaus Esterházy was laid to rest in the family
crypt in Eisenstadt's Franciscan church. Lászlo Esterházy, born June 4, 1905,
was the youngest brother of the late Prince Paul Esterházy. After growing up
in Eszterháza and Eisenstadt he studied agriculture in Keszthely and
political science in Budapest (wherein he earned a doctoral degree).

In 1929 he married Mariette Countess Erdödy de Monyorókerék and Monoszló. The
couple lived on his estate Majsa (in Hungary). They had 4 daughters and a
son, who died in an accident in Illmitz (Burgenland) in 1958.

In the 1930's László Esterházy inherited the Pottendorf estate from his uncle
Prince Nikolaus. In 1946 he was imprisoned for a short time. The Communist
government confiscated his Hungarian property and he moved to Pottendorf,
Austria.

During the Hungarian uprising of 1956 he was very active in providing aid to
his countrymen who fled to Austria by the thousands. For this and his life
long cooperation with ecclesiastical organisations he was awarded the Papal
order "Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice".

László Esterházy spent his last days in Lockenhaus castle, in the company of
his wife and his daughters. He died there on January 5, 2000.



BATTHYÁNY CRYPT GÜSSING (Albert Schuch)

The Batthyány family crypt in Güssing, situated underneath the Franciscan
church, is the second largest of its kind in Austria. (The largest is the
Habsburg crypt in Vienna's first district, known as "Kapuzinergruft".)
Currently the crypt is undergoing renovation. This work is said to be
finished by the end of the year 2000, and it started just recently with the
crypt's oldest parts, namely the sarcophagi of Count Adam Batthyány (died
1659) and his wife Baroness Aurora von Formentini. Their priceless tin
sarcophagi were made by Zacharias Laufer. The crypt, founded in 1648, is
probably best known for containing the sarcophagus of Fieldmarshall Prince
Karl Joseph Batthyány, whom Maria Theresia chose as educator (Ajo) for her
son, Emperor Joseph II. He died in 1772 and his lead sarcophagus is a work of
well known artist Balthasar Moll.




"BIG APPLE STRUDEL" IN NEW YORK (Albert Schuch)

The Austrian daily "Die Presse" recently (January 22, 2000) included an
article about an Austrian coffeehouse in New York, the "Big Apple Strudel" in
Manhattan (Upper East-Side). 30 year old co-owner Franziska SORGER (a native
of Styria) came to the US in 1994. She started this business 3 years ago,
after having received her green card. Meanwhile, her coffehouse is well known
in the area for its many Austrian pastries (including, of course, apple
strudel), the Linzer, Salzburg, Viennese and Grazer Breakfast, Wiener
Schnitzel and Goulash Soup. And once a year Franziska Sorger bakes a New
Years Eve Cake for NY Mayor Rudolph Giuliani.
(Ed. Note: my maternal grandfather Alois Sorger descends from a long line of
Sorgers in the Güssing area-while I have no proven links, the proximity to
Styria and the uncommon name make the above most interesting.)




A LETTER ABOUT THE BURGENLAND ENCLAVE OF SOUTH BEND, INDIANA (from Mary Morey)

Ed. Note: In the same way that our ancestors' immigration stories are being
forgotten, so too are the memories of first and second generation descendants
who remember their immigrant parents and grand parents. It is still not to
late to record them and thanks to some of the members of the Burgenland
Bunch, we are starting to get those stories for publication. The following
concerns the Burgenland immigrant enclave of South Bend, Indiana. Mary has
provided an excellent description of how it was. She writes:


"Greetings from Mary Morey in North Liberty, Indiana: I want to let you know
how much I appreciate the help I've gotten from the BB and your newsletters.
I am going thru the archives for the second time. I am pleased I found 2
"cousins" Rosemary Bradford and Norm Pihale. I have also been in contact
with Konrad Unger in Wallern thru them. He has an excellent website at
http://homepages.go.com/~konrad_unger

I purchased 2 books from amazon.com I find very interesting - "Exploring
Rural Austria" and "Austrian Cooking and Baking" both authored by Gretel
Beer. I also have the "Weihnachtszeit-Christmastime in Germany" cassette
tape by Al Meixner which is wonderful. It brings back good memories. I
found an excellent article "The World of Suleyman the Magnificent" in the
Nov. 1987 issue of National Geographic. It tells of the Turks seige of
Austria and Hungary.

There has been some discussion of Burgenland immigrants in various cities. I
am a first generation American and altho I can barely remember what I did
yesterday, I can recall names of Burgenland immigrants in South Bend,
Indiana. Most of them attended St. Mary's RC Church on S. Taylor Street
until the church and school were demolished and govt. housing was built in
its place. There was a mass said in
German occasionally by Fr. Louis Putz who taught at Notre Dame U. A new
church and parochial school (St. Mary's of the Assumption) was built on
Locust Road southwest of the city limits. Some of the old timers were very
upset when they found out they couldn't keep the beautiful altar, statues,
stain glass windows, etc. for the new church. They felt they paid for them
and belonged to them. The Burgenlanders lived in the southwest part of
SBend along with the Hungarians who attend Our Lady of Hungary RC Church on
Calvert Street. Many of them intermarried. The German speaking have the
Deutsch Fortbuildung Verein on the corner of Prairie Ave. and Indiana Ave.
(now known as the German Club) and the Hungarians had the Wm. Penn Club on
Indiana Ave. (half block away) which has disbanded. There was also the
Mannerchor which has disbanded. The immigrants came to S.Bend for job
opportunities (they thought the streets were paved with gold-my mother's
words-she did housework until she married and cared for a family of 3
daughters). My mother was Magdalena Gross from Frauenkirchen and father was
John Strobl from Neckenmarkt. They met in South Bend through mutual friends.
Most of the Burgenlanders are buried in Highland Cemetery on Portage Ave.
The men found jobs at Studebakers, Singers (sewing machines), Olivers (farm
equipment), Bendix (aviation) and Drewrys Brewery as well as smaller
companies who supplied parts to these companies.

These are the Burgenland families I recall: Andert, Bleich, Csenar, Ettl
(grocer), Freitag (tavern), Fuchs, Ganser, Gross, Gruber (grocer), Haas,
Hahn, Horwarth, Hutter, Kallinger, Kierein, Kirsits, Kotal, Kurz, Lentsch
(bakery-they sponsored my mother coming to this country in 1923), Mayerhofer,
Pantzer, Paar, Piller, Rammer, Reiner, Romwalter, Scheidl, Scheu,
Seiler/Sailer, Siderits, Steinhofer, Strantz, Strobl, Tschida, Wallisch,
Weinzetl, Weiss, Wieger, Winkler and Zwickl.

These are names of some of their friends and neighbors: Barilich, Benko,
Brenner, Buzolitz, Dezamitz, Eichstadt, Farkas, Gerenczer, Herczog, Horvath,
Katona, Keglovits (grocer), Kish, Kocsis, Kovatch, Lehner, Mezzei (grocer),
Miko, Nagy, Nemeth (funeral home), Nyari, Olczak (attorney), Petrass (family
doctor who made house calls), Pinter, Szabo, Szalay, Szucs, Takacs, Toth,
Vargo, Wukovits, and
Zahoran (funeral home).

I regret I cannot speak or write German altho I can understand some. My
older sister (8 years older) started school knowing only German. The
teachers told my parents they lived in the United States now and to speak
English with us. They hardly knew English themselves. My mother had a fifth
grade education. Both my parents taught themselves to read, write and speak
English. There were extremely stressful times during WW II. Family members
and loved ones were killed in the war. My mother and younger sister went to
Burgenland in 1970 and 1982. I asked them to ask family members for names &
dates for genealogy. Some information was obtained from the Frauenkirchen
church records. They were told by family this information was none of my
business. They had a hard time trusting anyone since the war.

We lived in the country on 10 acres. Our family had 2 cows for milk, butter
and cottage cheese. We raised chickens for eating and eggs, and a hog for
butchering (had a smokehouse) and a large garden. My father and some of his
friends made their own wine from Concord grapes. He died at an early age of
48 years.

As in most cities, the old neighberhoods have changed over the years. Some of
the older homes are in disrepair and have been torn down. The younger
generation moves onward and upward to bigger and better jobs and
neighborhoods."

The time period I recalled of the former St. Marys RC Church was in the 1940s
through 1960s. I thought of a few more names - the Burgenland families also
include Billischitz, Handler, Heschl and Mittermayer. Their friends and
neighbors include Hupka, Karafa, Kazmarek and Szoke.
Sincerely, Mary Strobl Morey



A NEW MEMBER'S LAMENT AND OUR ANSWER

Mary Ann E. Krisa writes:

I've been subscribing to Burgenlandische Gemeinschaft since 1976. My
grandfather's name was Paul Mirokovits and he came from Moeschendorf. My
grandmother always said she was from "Burgenland auf der Pinka." She
mentioned Guessing but we don't think she lived in the town. Her maiden name
was Eberhard. She had a cousin who lived in Eisenberg but we've forgotten her
name.

My parents live in Northampton PA USA. My mother used to speak Hienzisch with
her family and almost all our neighbors. Now she has no one left to talk to.
I used to be a German teacher and I can understand that dialect and read it.
But I could never hold a conversation in it. When my parents ' generation
passes away, so will the Burgenland culture and language in this country. I
really would like to know about our family in Austria. At the very least, I
can make my own children aware of who their forefathers are.

I'm very glad to be able to turn on the internet and see over 4,000
references to the Burgenland. My own mother never knew anything about it. We
had one black and whilte photo of a wooded field that was taken in
Moeschendorf--that's all any of us ever had from the "old country." Until we
discovered BG, we had no idea where the Burgenland even was. In 1991 my
oldest son and I were in Vienna and we went to Guessing by bus for a day
trip. We were in a cenetery looking at names on tombstones when 2 women
started a conversation with us. Both had relatives from the Allentown area,
which amazed and delighted us. I intend to visit again with my 2 other
children and certainly see Moeschendorf this time. I'm looking forward to
hearing from you. Mary Ann Krisa (from Scranton, PA area)

Our Reply

No the Burgenland culture will not pass, which is one reason why I started
the Burgenland Bunch. The lack of knowledge among the younger generations is
due mostly to the language barrier and secondly to the fact that the
geography and history of the Burgenland is not well known. Few even realize
that the name was first used in 1921 although thr region has been inhabited
since the stone age. The political changes likewise can be confusing.
Hungarian-Austrian--German and Croatian influence-Turkish
invasion-Austrian-Hungarian-German anschluss-Russian occupation-Austrian. One
must read many histories to unravel the enigma of this newest but oldest
Austrian "Land".

We are attempting to rectify the situation. As you look through our archives,
you will find todate 73 newsletters concerning Burgenland family history;
newsletters from the last two years alone average 24 pages per edition. Stay
with us and learn about the Burgenland. Print some for your children. Look
for the Moschendorf and Eisenberg writeups in our index available in our
archives from the homepage.

You also write:
<<I've been subscribing to Burgenlandische Gemeinschaft since 1976. My
grandfather's name was Paul Mirokovits and he came from Moeschendorf. My
grandmother always said she was from"Burgenland auf der Pinka."She mentioned
Guessing but we don't think she lived in the town. Her maiden name was
Eberhard. She had a cousin who lived in Eisenberg but we've
forgotten her name.>>

We would like to see an abbreviated English language edition of the
Burgenländische Gemeinschaft News on the internet. Modern computer technology
makes this feasible although the language translation is still labor
intensive.

The Mirokovits name is a Croatian one and the Moschendorf phone book still
has one family by that name. I suggest you contact Frank Teklits, our
Croatian contributing editor. He may be able to tell you more. He was born
and raised in Northampton. Güssing is important to you because it is the
"Bezirk" for the region which includes Moschendorf. My maternal grandparents
also came from the Güssing area-paternal from Heiligenkreuz-Poppendorf.
Eisenberg is slightly north east of Güssing-we have an Eberhard (Frieda)
among our membership.

The Burgenland church records available from the LDS are an added plus for
those interested in family history. No other group enjoys such a wealth of
pre immigration data. We are also explaining how these may be read and
translated.

We now have close to 500 members, so you see interest in Burgenland culture
is not dying-it just needs a little fertilization and tender care! If you'd
like to join us, just follow the instructions below-we'll be glad to have
you.



SEEKING DESCENDANTS OF BURGENLAND IMMIGRANTS IN THE UNITED STATES

Maria Gartner from Illmitz, Friedhofgasse 9 seeks descendants of immigrants
from her family in the USA. The last known address she has is an Alice
Haider, 1670 Ashland Ave., St. Paul / Minn.55104 Alice Haider was the
daughter of Michael Haider, born in Illmitz 26. 9. 1885 and died 23.
June1960. If you have information concerning descendants of the St. Paul
"Haider" family please respond to:

Bgld.Gemeinschaft, Renate Dolmanits; Burgenlaendische Gemeinschaft
Hauptplatz 7
A-7540 Guessing
tel: 03322/42598; fax: 03322/42133; email:



A NEW RUDERSDORF "BANKERLSITZLER" (Peter Sattler and G. Berghold)

In every village you'll find a bench (Bankerl) or two which serve as meeting
places for a few village elders. It may be by the village green, the
Gemeindeamt, the local Gasthaus, the cemetery or elsewhere. In visiting
southern Burgenland, my wife and I often ate our picnic lunches sitting on
these benches. The older folks gather by these benches and spread the news
(read "gossip"). Peter Sattler, editor of the Rudersdorf internet news
selected his local Bankerl as the title amd focus of his news site. He even
features pictures of the locals using the bench for their daily news
exchange.

The website is in German and provides news items for Rudersdorf, Dobersdorf,
Deutsch Kaltenbrün and Jennersdorf among others. All are in Bezirk
Jennersdorf, the most southerly Burgenland district. Even if you don't read
German, you'll appreciate the pictures. You might even see a relative. This
issue also has a village directory of residents. You'll enjoy a visit. There
is a link to the BB. We've had this site in our URL list for some time, but
see below:

Peter writes:

lieber gerry, die neue ausgabe meines "bankerlsitzer" ist im jänner
erschienen und seither auch im internet. vielleicht kannst du das den
interessierten mitteilen - burgenlandbunch etc. adressen:
http://www.sbox.tu-graz.ac.at/home/b/bzotter/bs
oder
http://come.to/bankerlsitzer
hoffentlich funktioniert es - lasse es mich bitte wissen.

(translated) Dear Gerry, the new edition of my "bankerlsitzler" appears on
the internet in January. Perhaps you can let the BB know if interested. Here
are the addresses. Hope it functions properly, please let me know. (which I
promptly did, telling him how much I'd like to be able to join the "sitzlers"
every day and talk about old and new times).

(Newsletter continues as no. 74A)

This thread: