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Subject: Ca-Merced Co. History (County Officials)
Date: 2 Feb 2006 01:26:13 -0000


Merced County CA Archives History - Books .....County Officials 1925
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Book Title: History Of Merced County California

CHAPTER XVI

COUNTY OFFICIALS

We cannot be entirely sure that we have the names of all the early county
officials. The first book of the minutes of the board of supervisors—Book A—is
not indexed, and moreover the rather sketchy nature of the early minutes leaves
us with some lurking doubts, as for example when the board canvassed the votes
of one of the very early elections, and the minutes recite that fact and the
further fact that they ordered certificates of election issued to those who had
received the greatest number of votes, but do not tell us who the successful
candidates—or the unsuccessful, either—were. It is probable, however, that the
following list is pretty nearly complete for the period prior to February 6,
1867, when Book B begins, and complete after that date.

In the minutes of the first meeting of the board of supervisors, on June 4,
1855, G. H. Murry (so the minutes spell it), William J. Barfield, and S. L.
Kelly were the supervisors. Murray was chairman. E. G. Rector was clerk. "M.
Stockard" was appointed justice of the peace in Township One and William Finch
and William Wall in Township Two. This meeting of June and another in August
were all the board held at the county seat on the Turner and Osborn Ranch, so
far as the minutes reveal. On September 17 there was an election, and on October
1 we find by the minutes that A. Stevinson has succeeded Murray as supervisor
and chairman of the board. Jack W. Smith is mentioned as district attorney in
the minutes of November 5.

We may go back here long enough to quote the following list of officers
elected at the election on the second Monday in May, 1855. It is taken from the
1881 Elliott & Moore history: "John W. Fitzhugh, County Judge; E. G. Rector,
County Clerk; Charles F. Bludworth, Sheriff; Jack W. Smith, District Attorney;
George W. Halstead, County Treasurer; James W. Robertson, County Assessor;
Erastus Kelsey, County Surveyor; Gordon H. Murray, W. J. Bar-field, and Samuel
D. Kelly, Board of Supervisors; Samuel H. P. Ross, and J. A. Vance, Associate
Justices."

On November 4, 1856, B. F. Howell appears as supervisor for District One,
Silas March for District Two, and John Sylvester for District Three. On February
3, 1857, S. H. P. Ross appears as superintendent of schools. We have already
noticed in another chapter One. On May 4 of the same year R. R. Leak was
appointed constable in Township One in place of R. H. Crozier, who had left the
county. The Merced Banner appears as the official paper.

In October, 1863, R. V. Woodcock appears as supervisor from District One, P.
Y. Welch from District Two, and Silas March from District Three. There had been
an election the previous month, on September 2. The county cast 295 votes for W.
S. Montgomery and 100 for A. Ingalsbe, for State Senator, and 300 for W. S.
Dickenson and 94 for J. C. Breen for assemblyman. P. D. Wigginton was elected
district attorney; E. G. Rector, sheriff; J. W. Bost, clerk; L. P. Wilson,
assessor; D. A. Jamison, treasurer; W. G. Collier, surveyor; S. M. Brown,
coroner; R. B. Huey, superintendent of schools; J. M. Strong, public
administrator. The county gave J. M. Baudurant 212 votes and E. Burke 39 for
district judge in the Thirteenth Judicial District. J. W. Robertson was elected
county judge. R. R. Leak and A. C. McSwain were elected justices of the peace
and J. B. Sensabaugh and J. M. Hicks constables, in Township One; and J. C. C.
Russell and A. J. W. Albeck, justices in Township Two.

On November 2, 1863, appears an appointment of A. C. McSwain as justice of
the peace of Township One, to succeed Samuel J. Benton, resigned, apparently to
fill the unexpired term.

Silas March, I. N. Ward, and P. Y. Welch appear as supervisors in the minutes
on February 3, 1864, apparently elected the preceding year. Early in 1864 there
appears to have been an election of supervisors ; R. V. Woodcock, Silas March,
and James Cunningham appear in the minutes, February 20, 1864, as supervisors
for Districts One, Two, and Three respectively.

On May 2, 1864, R. R. Leak was appointed county clerk in place of J. W. Bost,
resigned; and S. H. P. Ross, justice of the peace in Township One in place of R.
R. Leak, resigned. At this date there is a minute to the effect that the
Democratic Record is the official paper of the county.

There was an election on November 8, 1864. Nicholas Breen, Silas March, and
E. Russell were elected supervisors. On February 7, 1865, T. O. Ellis was
appointed superintendent of schools in place of R. B. Huey, resigned.

During this year the Merced Herald is made the county paper.

At the election of September 6, 1865, R. H. Ward received 151 votes in the
county for assemblyman, and A. Ingalsbe 141. C. M. Blair was elected clerk; D.
A. Jamison, treasurer; J. B. Sensabaugh, sheriff; P. D. Wigginton, district
attorney; W. G. Collier, surveyor; S. M. Brown, coroner; James E. Hicks,
assessor; J. M. Strong, public administrator; T. O. Ellis, superintendent of
schools; C. F. Bludworth and W. B. Thompson, constables of Township One; and C.
Helmer and A. Douth, constables of Township Two. On October 18, 1865, R. R. Leak
and Samuel H. P. Ross appear as justices of the peace in Township One, and E.
Hunter and A. Albeck in Township Two.

On November 7, 1865, appears a new Township Three, and Abner Phelps as
justice of the peace for it. On the same date Charles M. Blair, clerk-elect, was
appointed clerk to fill out the unexpired few weeks of R. R. Leak, resigned.

On February 8, 1866,--------Hill was appointed justice of the peace in
Township Three.

At an election on March 28, 1866, John B. Cocanour was elected supervisor in
District One.

There appear through the minutes several appointments of "Judges of the
Plains." On May 5, 1856, John Sylvester, John Ruddle, Jr., S. R. De Hart and
Bates De Hart appear. On May 4, 1858, the board appointed Arthur Tooms, John
Ruddle, George G. Belt, and Ezekiel -------. No further appointment seems to
have been made through the whole period from then on until after the close of
the Civil War; but on February 4, 1866, the board appointed P. W. Vaughn and
Archibald Rice. This institution of "Judge of the Plains," or Juaz de Campo, was
one (it has been said to have been the only one) of the institutions of the
Mexicans taken over by their American successors. It was the function of the
judges of the plains to attend rodeos and decide questions of the ownership of
cattle; and from some items in the papers in the sixties, it seems to have been
their duty also to check over for ownership any cattle being driven through—or
out of—the county. There is a newspaper story in the Herald in the sixties,
quoted elsewhere, about three men, apparently judges of the plains, stopping
three citizens of Maximilian's Empire who were driving some forty cattle across
the Merced towards Sonora, and the Mexicans paid for the only animal which
seemed to belong to a Merced County owner.

On February 6, 1867, N. Breen was appointed constable to fill a vacancy
created by the resignation of William S. Thompson in Township Number One, and
William S. Weed was appointed justice of the peace to succeed R. R. Leak, deceased.

At the general election held Wednesday, September 9, 1867, James B.
Sensabaugh was elected sheriff; Charles M. Blair, county clerk; D. A. Jamison,
county treasurer; R. H. Ward, district attorney; James H. Cox, assessors; F. J.
Hardwick, public administrator; M. C. Monroe, superintendent of common schools;
William G. Collier, county surveyor; Thomas H. Patterson, coroner; J. B.
Cocanour, supervisor in District One, A. Harrel in District Two, and John K.
Mears in District Three; S. M. Brown and Samuel Shears, constables in Township
One; and Arch Rice and Charles Helmer, constables in Township Two. The board of
supervisors organized by electing J. B. Cocanour chairman, succeeding Silas
March, who had been first elected a supervisor ten years earlier.

At the special judicial election on October 16, 1867, James W. Robertson was
elected county judge; Erastus Eagleson and William S. Weed, justices of the
peace for Township One; E. Hunter and Reuben Hail, justices of the peace for
Township Two; and Joseph De Hart and Joseph Bittick justices of the peace for
Township Three. On November 6, 1868, H. B. Jolley was appointed a justice of the
peace for Township Three.

At the general election on Tuesday, November 3, 1868, John B. Cocanour was
elected supervisor for District One for the three-year term beginning the first
Monday in March, 1869. On August 4, 1869, Erastus Eagleson resigned as a justice
of the peace in Township One, and A. Boyce was appointed to succeed him.

At the general election on Wednesday, September 6, 1869, S. M. Brown was
elected sheriff; James E. Hicks, clerk; James H. Cox, assessor; R. H. Ward,
district attorney; George Turner, treasurer; William G. Collier, surveyor; M. C.
Monroe, superintendent of schools; V. H. Cox, coroner; T. J. Hardwick, public
administrator; John K. Mears, supervisor from District Three (and he became
chairman on organization of the board) ; R. H. Northfield and William L. Silman,
constables for Township One; William C. Wilson and Joseph L. Turner, for
Township Two; and J. Stubbs and W. R. Wiggs, for Township Three.

At the special judicial election on October 20, 1869, L. W. Tal-bott (he of
the four-dollar dog on the 1857 assessment roll) and A. Boyce were elected
justices of the peace for Township One; E. Hunter and Mathias Smythe, for
Township Two; and A. W. Hulse, for Township Three.

At a special election held the first Wednesday in September, 1870, J. C.
Morrison was elected supervisor from District Two for the three-year term
beginning the first Monday of March, 1871, and we find A. Harrel chairman of the
board.

On February 8, 1871, Mark Wyatt was appointed justice of the peace in
Township Three to fill a vacancy created by the removal of A. Boyce. Three days
later Amos A. Hicks was appointed assessor, James H. Cox having died.

The county's vote cast during the years from 1867 to 1869 for other officers
for districts larger than the county, from district judge and assemblyman to
United States Senator, were as follows: On September 9, 1867, for United States
Senator, T. G. Phelps, 56; S. B. Axtell, 253. For State senator, H. A. Skelton
68; James H. Lawrence 233. For assemblyman, J. W. Newson, 252. For district
judge, A. C. Bradford, 210. On November 3, 1868, the county cast for Member of
Congress: For S. B. Axtell, 274, and for Frank M. Pixley, 98. On September 6,
1869, the county's vote for assemblyman: J. B. Cocanour, 260; Miner Walden, 33;
A. Ingalsbe, 76.

At the general election held September 6, 1871, James E. Hicks was elected
clerk; Samuel M. Brown, sheriff; George Turner, treasurer; H. F. Blackwell,
assessor; R. H. Ward, district attorney; Samuel H. P. Ross, superintendent of
schools; Mark Howell, surveyor; V. H. Cox, coroner; Thomas G. Hardwick, public
administrator; William H. Bean and William M. Bagby, constables of Township One;
and T. J. James and A. Jones, constables of Township Two. J. S. Cocanour
continues as chairman of the board of supervisors.

At the judicial election Monday, October 23, 1871, James W. Robertson was
elected county judge; L. W. Talbott and Willis Hicks, justices of the peace for
Township One; J. C. Jenkins and R. S. Clay, justices for Township Two; and R. J.
Ashe and N. H. Spencer, justices for Township Three.

In 1872 we find J. K. Mears chairman of the board. On August 6, of that year,
M. T. McPherson was appointed constable in Township One in place of William
Bean, removed; S. P. Curry, constable in Township Two; and Richard Simpsen,
justice of the peace in Township Two. At a special election on September 11 of
that year, Ion Simons was elected supervisor of District Two.

The election to remove the county seat was held December 12, 1872. On
November 4 of that year G. W. Rogers was appointed constable of Township Three
and S. S. Reynolds justice of the peace.

At the general election on November 5 of that year the vote cast for
Congressman stood: S. V. Houghton, 257; E. J. Kewin, 393.

On February 5, 1873, George Powell was appointed justice of the peace in
Township Two in place of Mathias Smythe, resigned. On May 6, 1873, N. Breen was
appointed constable of Township One to succeed William M. Bagby, deceased, and
Wilber F. Clark was appointed justice of the peace of Township Five. This is the
first mention of Township Five, and strangely enough there appear no officers
for Township Four. See, a little further on, the results of the general election
of September 3 of this year. On May 10, Thomas A. Leggett was appointed justice
of the peace for Township Two in place of George Powell, resigned; on July 8,
John K. Law was appointed superintendent of schools to succeed Samuel H. P.
Ross, deceased; and on August 7, George H. Perrin was appointed county surveyor
to succeed Mark Howell, resigned. Silas March appears as chairman of the board
this year.

At the general election on September 3, 1873, H. B. Davis received 525 votes
and William Waldo 75 in this county for assemblyman. A. J. Meany was elected
sheriff; George Turner, treasurer; James E. Hicks, clerk; D. M. McKenney,
district attorney; George H. Perrin, surveyor; H. N. Rucker, coroner; G. W.
Rogers, assessor; Ion Simons, supervisor for District Two; M. T. McPherson and
Frank Sheridan, constables for Township One; George Powell and S. P. Curry,
constables for Township Two; William M. Vinley and Charles S. Johnson,
constables for Township Five; and W. W. Abbott and T. W. Coleman, constables for
Township Three.

At the judicial election on October 15, 1873, the county cast for district
judge, 471 votes for Alex. Deering and 267 for A. C. Bradford. Our five judicial
townships now appear, thus indicating the creation of Le Grand and Livingston
Townships, in addition to Township One at Snelling, Township Two at Merced, and
Township Three at Los Banos, and also indicating the growth of population along
the railroad and the increase of the wheat-growing industry. Justices of the
peace were elected as follows: Township One, L. W. Talbott and W. H. Hamilton;
Township Two, R. Simpson and T. A. Leggett; Township Three, T. J. Wilcox and
William S. Weed; Township Four, R. J. Ashe; and Township Five, C. Talbott and
Wilber F. Clark.

In 1874, on May 8, Y. Poncabore was appointed constable of Township One in
place of Frank Sheridan, resigned; and on September 2, John B. Cocanour was
elected supervisor of District One. Silas March continues this year as chairman
of the board.

R. H. Ward was appointed district attorney on May 3, 1875, "D. M. McKenney,"
says the minute, "having failed to do duty."

At the general election on September 1 of that year, the county cast for
Member of Congress, 588 votes for P. D. Wigginton, 316 for S. O. Houghton, and
235 for J. S. Thompson; for State senator, 506 votes for R. H. Ward and 639 for
J. M. Montgomery; for assemblyman, S53 for J. W. Wilcox and 510 for W. J.
Howard. A. J. Meany was elected sheriff; George Turner, treasurer; E. J.
Hamilton, recorder; James E. Hicks, clerk; A. D. Turner, assessor; J. K. Law,
district attorney; E. Beaumont, surveyor; B. F. Fowler, superintendent of
schools; H. N. Rucker, coroner; B. F. Davis, supervisor for District Three; and
for constable, S. Addison and George W. Halstead were elected in Township One;
E. A. Packer and Joseph Leeson, in Township Two; W. W. Abbott and E. C. Mason,
in Township Three; Richard Shaffer, in Township Four; and G. F. Lawrence and
Charles J. Johnson, in Township Five.

At the judicial election on October 20, 1875, J. W. Robertson was elected
county judge, and justices of the peace were elected as follows : Township One,
H. F. Buckley and L. W. Talbott; Township Two, J. O. Blackburn and T. A.
Leggett; Township Three; T. J, E. Wilcox and J. F. Sumner; Township Four, H. F.
Rosecrans and L. B. McCormack; Township Five, S. A. Smith and Ira J. Tren. J. K.
Mears is chairman of the board for 1875. Ion Simons succeeds him in 1876.
On May 2, 1876, H. A. Harrelson was appointed justice of the peace for Township
One, and at a special election that year W. J. Quigley was elected supervisor
for District Two.

At the general election on November 7, 1876, the county cast for Congressman,
776 votes for P. D. Wigginton and 572 for R. Pacheco.

In 1877, J. B. Cocanour again becomes chairman of the board. On March 19 of
that year, Frank H. Farrar was appointed justice of the peace in Township Two.

At the general election on September 5, 1877, the county cast for
assemblyman: 557 votes for Andrew Ewing and 357 for R. S. Clay. A. J. Meany was
elected sheriff; George Turner, treasurer; James E. Hicks, clerk; P. B. King,
district attorney; E. J. Hamilton, recorder; William G. Collier, surveyor; L. D.
Stockton, superintendent of schools; H. N. Rucker, coroner; and G. C. Baker,
supervisor of District One. Constables were elected as follows: Township One, G.
W. Halstead and A. Bertrandis; Township Two, E. A. Packer and Joseph Leeson;
Township Three, Daniel Donovan and J. A. Barker; Township Four, Eli M. McKee;
Township Five, C. S. John and L. C. Davis.

At the judicial election, October 17, 1877, the county cast for district
judge, 392 votes for J. B. Campbell and 20 for L. F. Jones. J. A. Harrelson and
W. L. Williams were elected justices of the peace in Township One; N. Breen and
T. A. Leggett, in Township Two; Nelson Howeth and A. M. Chadwick, in Township
Three; J. W. Campbell, in Township Four; J. A. Worthington and Ira J. Tren, in
Township Five.

In 1878, B. F. Davis appears as chairman of the board of supervisors. On may
6 of that year Andrew Lauder was appointed justice of the peace to succeed A. M.
Chadwick, resigned. At a special election on September 4, N. Bibby was elected
supervisor of District Three.

In 1879, W. J. Quigley is chairman of the board. On July 2, apparently by
appointment, J. B. Cocanour succeeds G. C. Baker, resigned, as supervisor of
District One.

At the general election held September 3, 1879, the county's vote for Member
of Congress was 511 for Wallace Leach, 425 for R. Pacheco, and 146 for J. J.
Ayers; for Senator, 511 for D. M. Pool and 565 for T. W. Drullard; for
assemblyman, 491 for W. F. Coffman and 585 for N. S. Rogers.

We now come under the present State constitution, and the first superior
judge appears in the person of Charles H. Marks. William J. Quigley was elected
treasurer; John Simonson, clerk; A. J. Meany, sheriff and tax collector; Frank
H. Farrar, district attorney; E. J. Hamilton, auditor and recorder; W. B. Aiken,
assessor; John W. Bost, surveyor; E. T. Dixon, superintendent of schools; H. N.
Rucker, coroner and public administrator; Thomas Upton, supervisor of District
Two. In Township One, J. R. Horsley and M. D. D. Wick-ham were elected justices
of the peace, and A. Bertrandis and George F. Hannah, constables; in Township
Two, T. H. Leggett and N. Breen, justices, and Joseph Leeson and F. M.
Gardenhire, constables; in Township Three, T. J. E. Wilcox and Andrew Lauder,
justices, and D. Donovan and A. H. Ross, constables; in Township Four, T. F.
Smith and David Chedister, justices, and James Beel and Samuel Stevinson,
constables; in Township Five, W. R. Wiggs and W. F. Clark, justices, and Charles
S. Johnson and L. C. Davis, constables. W. J. Quigley was chairman of the board
during this year, going to the office of county treasurer at the beginning of 1880.

It will be noted that a lot of new blood came in at this first election under
the constitution of 1879: Marks, Simonson, Aiken, Bost, Upton. Bost had held the
office of deputy under Surveyor William G. Collier in the late sixties. Frank H.
Farrar is new in the district attorney's office, although he had held township
office before, as we have seen. On October 22, 1879, P. D. Wigginton was
appointed district attorney in place of P. B. King, deceased. This was obviously
only for the remainder of 1879, as Frank H. Farrar had been elected on September
3 for the term beginning the first of 1880.

On March 19, 1880, appears an appointment of H. N. Rucker as coroner and
public administrator, to which combined offices he had been elected the previous
September. The necessity for the appointment is not explained. During this year,
N. Bibby was chairman of the board of supervisors.

At the general election on November 2, 1880 (note that the general election
of 1879 had been in September, under the old constitution), the county cast for
Members of Congress, 529 votes for R. Pacheco and 692 for Wallace Leach; for
assemblyman, 511 for Samuel C. Bates and 698 for John W. Bost. W. L. Means was
elected supervisor from District One. Justices of the peace in the several
townships were elected as follows: J. A. Harrelson in Township One, J. O.
Blackburn in Township Two, A. Lauder in Township Three, J. G. Schroder in
Township Four, W. F. Clarke and W. R. Wiggs in Township Five; and the
constables, as follows: A. Bertrandis in Township One, Joseph Leeson in Township
Two, Louis H. Abbott in Township Three, John A. Henderson in Township Four, and
C. L. Johnson and L. C. Davis in Township Five.

On January 3, 1881, Mark Howell was appointed county surveyor in place of
John W. Bost, who had resigned on account of his election to the assembly. On
March 31, John F. McSwain by appointment succeeded E. J. Hamilton as recorder;
and on May 7, I. J. Buckley was appointed to succeed J. A. Harrelson, resigned,
as justice of the peace in Township One. On November 10, J. A. Langan was
appointed justice of the peace in Township Five to succeed W. F. Clarke,
resigned. On December 29, W. P. Stoneroad was appointed county surveyor in place
of Mark Howell, resigned. N. Bibby was chairman of the board during this year
also, but Thomas Upton succeeds him in that capacity in 1882.

On May 31, 1882, I. J. Buckley having resigned as justice of the peace in
Township One, J. A. Harrelson, his predecessor, was appointed to the office again.

At the general election on November 7, 1882, the county cast for Congressman,
532 votes for G. L. Wood and 892 for P. B. Tully; and for Representative to
Congress at large, 543 for Henry Edgerton, 548 for W. W. Morrow, 881 for Charles
Sumner, and 878 for John Gascock (Glascock?). Evidently they were voting for
two. For essemblyman the county cast 657 votes for R. S. Clay and 745 for W. L.
Smith. A. J. Meany was elected sheriff; John H. Simonson, clerk; John F.
McSwain, recorder; M. D. Wood, treasurer; Frank H. Farrar, district attorney;
William B. Aiken, assessor; W. P. Stoneroad, surveyor; E. T. Dixon,
superintendent of schools; J. E. P. Williams, coroner. There were elected three
new supervisors: B. H. Dean from District One, W. H. Hartley from District Two,
and J. L. Crittenden from District Three. Justices of the peace were elected as
follows: J. A. Herrelson in Township One, J. W. Robertson in Township Two, T. J.
E. Wilcox in Township Three, J. F. Ward in Township Four, and W. J. Stockton in
Township Five; and constables as follows: A. Bertrandis in Township One, Joseph
Leeson in Township Two, A. K. Bagwell in Township Three, William Steele in
Township Four, L. C. Davis in Township Five.

On May 11, 1883, Dan Donovan was appointed constable of Township Three to
succeed A. K. Bagwell, resigned.

On March 4, 1884, Merced and Mariposa Counties appear to have been made into one
assembly district. On the 15th of the same month, W. L. Smith, assemblyman,
having removed from the State, there was a special election for assemblyman, at
which this county cast 254 votes for N. S. Rogers and 528 for J. W.
Breckinridge. On April 12, Andrew Lauder was appointed justice of the peace of
Township Three in place of T. J. E. Wilcox, resigned, and two days later, E. C.
Fitzhugh, constable of Township One in place of A. Bertrandis, resigned.

At the general election on November 4, 1884, the county cast for Congressman,
806 votes for J. A. Louttit and 969 for Charles A. Sumner; for State senator,
807 for A. E. Wagstaff and 973 for J. D. Spencer; and for member of assembly,
807 for I. J. Buckley and 961 for G. G. Gaucher. C. H. Marks was elected
superior judge; J. L. Crittenden, sheriff; John H. Simonson, clerk; Robert N.
Hughes, auditor; John G. Elliott, recorder; Frank M. Ostrander, district
attorney; M. D. Wood, treasurer; L. H. Bradley, coroner and public
administrator; L. M. Gillham, surveyor.

We now arrive at the point where the county has five supervisors instead of
three, and find an entire new board elected: John A. Montgomery from District
One, Henry Creighton from District Two, W. W. Gray from District Three, E. L.
Sturgeon from District Four, and C. W. Smith from District Five. This board went
in at the beginning of 1885, and on organization elected E. L. Sturgeon
chairman. J. L. Crittenden was chairman in 1884.

In Judicial Township One, J. A. Harrelson and S. W. Blaisdell were elected
justices of the peace and E. C. Fitzhugh, constable; in Township Two, N. Breen
and Andrew Lauder, justices, and F. M. Gardenhire and T. H. Leggett, constables;
in Township Three, W. R. Wiggs and W. J. Stockton, justices, and L. C. Davis and
J. W. Graham, constables.

On April 7, 1885, A. E. Knight was appointed constable in Township Three, "L. C.
Davis having failed to return to State at end of sixty day leave." On July 10,
Henry Latour was appointed constable of Township One in place of E. C. Fitzhugh,
resigned.

In 1886, C. W. Smith was chairman of the board. On May 19 of that year, John
F. McSwain was appointed sheriff to succeed J. L. Crittenden, deceased.

At the general election held November 2, 1886, the county cast 967 votes for
Marion Biggs, for Congressman, and 698 for J. C. Campbell. A. J. Meany was
elected State senator for the Thirtieth District; and J. W. Bost, assemblyman
for the Sixty-seventh District. Meany received in this county 955 votes, to 656
for C. F. Wade; and Bost, 1034 against 637 for W. E. Gallison. John H. Givens
was elected sheriff; Jerry Myall, clerk; R. N. Hughes, auditor; J. G. Elliott,
recorder; J. W. Breckinridge, district attorney; J. K. P. Price, treasurer; J.
A. Norvell, superintendent of schools; M. D. Wood, assessor; C. D. Martin,
surveyor; E. S. O'Brien, coroner; W. W. Gray, supervisor from District Three;
and W. J. Stockton, supervisor from District Five. In Township One, C. E.
Blewett and J. A. Harrelson were elected justices, and A. Bertrandis and T. V.
Estes, constables; in Township Two, Andrew Lauder and J. W. Robertson, justices,
and H. W. French and F. M. Gardenhire, constables ; in Township Three, W. E.
Merritt and T. W. Ralley, justices, and A. A. Bither and B. W. Jeffers,
constables. Apparently Judicial Townships Four and Five have lapsed, having been
merged into the first three. W. W. Gray appears as chairman of the board for
1887, and J. A. Montgomery for 1888.

On April 30, 1888, Frank Howell was appointed treasurer to succeed J. K. P.
Price, deceased.

At the general election on November 6, 1888, the county cast for Congressman,
764 votes for John Eagan and 968 for Marion Biggs; for assemblyman, 977 for W.
M. Rundell, 40 for J. O. Blackburn, and 70 for John Conway. C. A. H. Warfield
was elected sheriff; Jerry Myall, clerk; R. N. Hughes, auditor; E. A. Hicks,
recorder; J. W. Breckinridge, district attorney; E. J. Rector, treasurer, C. D.
Martin, surveyor; E. S. O'Brien, coroner; J. A. Montgomery, supervisor from
District One; C. C. Nelson, supervisor from District Two; and J. H. Edwards,
supervisor from District Four. For Township One, J. A. Harrelson and W. C.
Bennett were justices of the peace, and C. E. Blanchard and Edgar Latour,
constables—the latter now constable in the same Township; for Township Two, J.
W. Robertson and J. Y. Jones, justices, and Thomas F. Carrigan and T. H.
Leggett, constables; for Township Three, W. E. Merritt and C. W. Smith,
justices, and B. W. Jeffers and A. A. Bither, constables.

At the general election on November 4, 1890, this county gave A. Caminetti
990 votes for Congressman, and G. G. Blanchard 868; for State senator, T. O.
Hays 988 and J. C. Needham 889; and for assemblyman, F. H. Gould 959 and Henry
Nelson 902. J. K. Law was elected superior judge; C. A. H. Warfield, sheriff; J.
G. Elliott, clerk; Nick Breen, auditor; E. A. Hicks, recorder; B. F. Fowler,
district attorney; J. H. Simonson, assessor; R. F. Bartlett, treasurer; J. A.
Norvell, superintendent of schools; E. S. O'Brien, public administrator; C. A.
Robinson, surveyor; R. Shaffer, supervisor from District Three; and J. W. Haley,
supervisor from District Five. William M. Gray appears as chairman of the board
in 1890; and J. A. Montgomery again in 1891.

On March 4, 1891, H. R. Potter was appointed justice of the peace in Township
Three to succeed W. E. Merritt, resigned, and on May 13, James E. Hicks in
Township Two to succeed J. W. Robertson, deceased. The death of J. W. Robertson
removed one of the original officers upon the formation of the county; he was
assessor in 1855.

John A. Montgomery appears as chairman of the board in 1892. On May 2 of that
year the name of T. A. Mack, the present sheriff, first appears as a county
officer; he was appointed constable in Township Two to succeed T. F. Carrigan,
resigned. On September 29 of this year, George A. Kahl was appointed justice of
the peace in Township Four.

The general election of 1892 took place on November 8. The county cast 713
votes for William M. Bowers and 893 for Olin Wellborn, for Congressman; 646 for
J. S. Alexander and 1055 for F H. Gould, for assemblyman. C. A. H. Warfield was
elected sheriff; J. G. Elliott, clerk; N. Breen, auditor; Jeff. Fruit, recorder;
R. F. Bartlett, treasurer; F. G. Ostrander, district attorney; A. G. Clough,
coroner and public administrator; W. P. Stoneroad, surveyor; George P. Kelsey,
supervisor from District One; C. C. Nelson, supervisor from District Two; and J.
H. Edwards, supervisor from District Four. The election of F. G. Ostrander as
district attorney put into that office the second son of Harvey J. Ostrander,
pioneer of the county. Another son, Frank M. Ostrander, had been elected to that
office in 1884, as we have seen. F. G. Ostrander and his nephew Frank M. (the
latter the son of the Frank M. elected in 1884) are now practicing law in Merced
under the firm name of Ostrander & Ostrander.

At this election of 1892, J. A. Harrelson and Jesse Neighbor were elected
justices, and Fred Griffith and C. E. Rhodes constables, of Township One; James
E. Hicks and J. B. Ralston justices, and Thomas A. Mack and G. W. Yoakum
constables, in Township Two; Charles W. Smith and S. A. Smith justices, and
Jacob Gardner, Jr., and B. W. Jeffers constables, in Township Three; G. A. Kahl
and F. G. Poor justices, and Norman Moss and John A. Artman constables, in
Township Four. Township Four now appears again.

The two constables elected that year for the Merced Township are now, one of
them, sheriff (T. A. Mack), and the other in charge of the court house park (G.
W. Yoakum). Fred Griffith, elected constable at Snelling, was a son of that Dr.
Joshua Griffith who came to Merced River bottom in 1852, when the only men on
the river, according to his information given in his life sketch in the history
of 1881, were John M. Montgomery, Samuel Scott, and James Waters.

Township Five now appears again. On January 12, 1893, L. M. Gillihan was
appointed justice of the peace for the new township. The appointment was
rescinded the next day. Gillihan was reappointed March 6, 1893. On October 5 of
this year, Edgar Latour was appointed constable in Township One to fill a
vacancy caused by the creation of the new Township Five.

The People's Party appears in the general election held on November 6, 1893.
In this county, C. H. Castle, People's Party, received 832 votes for State
senator; E. D. McCabe, Democrat, 603; and John H. Shine, Republican, 458; and
for assemblyman, Horace G. Kelsey, People's Party, received 742 votes; J. R.
Broughton, Democrat, 470; and L. A. Richards, Republican, 660. C. A. H. Warfield
was elected sheriff; J .H. Simonson, assessor; T. H. Leg-gett, recorder; William
H. Cook, auditor; O. W. Grove, school superintendent; W. P. Stoneroad, surveyor;
A. G. Clough, coroner and public administrator; F. G. Ostrander, district
attorney; R. Shaffer, supervisor for District Three; and J. W. Haley, supervisor
for District Five. In Township One, G. B. Neighbor and J. A. Harrelson were
elected justices and Edgar Latour and A. L. Standi-ford, constables; in Township
Two, John Naffziger and Fred Read, justices, and T. A. Mack and John Rahilly,
constables; in Township Three, C. F. Bertholf and C. S. Cothran, justices, and
Jake Carter and Joel Webb, constables; in Township Four, George A. Kahl and
B. C. H. Turner, justices, and William Boyd and Thomas D. Willson, constables;
in Township Five, B. Berry and R. A. Weaver, justices, and W. W. Abbott and C.
S. McSwain, constables. E. A. Hicks and A. M. Vanderlip tied for county clerk,
and on December 20 a special election was held for that office again and Hicks
defeated Vanderlip. C. C. Nelson appears as chairman of the board during 1894,
and also during the next two years.

On January 15, 1895, C. F. Blewett was appointed justice of the peace in
Township Five. For some reason the two justices elected in Township Four at the
general election in November, 1894, were appointed in March, 1895, to the same
offices. The appointment of B. C. H. Turner was made March 4, and that of George
D. Kahl on March 7.

A special election of January 21, 1896, to elect a supervisor in District
Four, resulted in the choice of John Q. Drummond.

The general election of that year was held on November 3. For Congressman, C.
H. Castle received in the county 1000 votes and William W. Bowers 578; for
assemblyman, A. S. Emory, 544, and J. G. Elliott, 1155. J. K. Law was elected
superior judge; A. B. Hamilton, supervisor for District One; Paul Neumann,
supervisor for District Two; and G. W. Abbott, supervisor for District Four.

On January 7, 1897, S. W. Dickinson was appointed constable in Township Four,
and on December 9, R. N. Hughes was appointed recorder to fill a vacancy caused
by the death of T. H. Leggett. J. W. Haley was chairman of the board this year
and during 1898.

At the general election on November 8, 1898, the county gave Curtis H. Castle
1169 votes for Congressman, against 699 for James C. Needham; for State senator
the Twelfth District gave J. B. Curtin 1066, against 774 for Joseph McNeil; and
for assemblyman the Fifty-seventh District gave A. T. Hastings 964 and G. R.
Stewart 944. It is interesting to observe the gradual growth of the total vote;
but it is still only about one-quarter of the total which the county now casts.
Allowance must now be made, however, for the women's vote. C. A. H. Warfield was
again elected sheriff; W. B. Croop was elected clerk; A. G. Clough, assessor; D.
C. Bambauer, treasurer; W. H. Cook, auditor; E. W. Stockird, recorder; F. G.
Ostrander, district attorney; O. W. Grove, superintendent of schools; H. H.
Henderson, surveyor; George W. Kibby, tax collector; F. E. Lilley, coroner and
public administrator; C. H. Deane, supervisor for District Three; and W. H.
Ogden, supervisor for District Five. In Township One, J. A. Harrelson was
elected justice of the peace and E. J. Feldhaus, constable; in Township Two,
George F. Crocker, justice, and J. M. Smith, constable; in Township Three, C. S.
Coth-ran, justice, and C. H. Wiley, constable; in Township Four, George A. Kahl,
justice, and Wade Turner, constable; in Township Five, Benjamin Berry, justice,
and John George, constable.

In 1899, Paul Neumann appears as chairman of the board. On November 16 of
that year, W. J. Stockton was appointed coroner and public administrator in
place of F. E. Lilley, deceased.

On March 13, 1900, T. A. Mack was appointed the county's first game warden.
The following day Jeff. Fruit was appointed justice of the peace in Township Two
to succeed George L. Crocker, resigned. On May 15 of this year F. G. Ostrander
was appointed superior judge to succeed J. K. Law, resigned. J. F. McSwain was
appointed district attorney to fill the vacancy caused by Judge Ostrander's
promotion.

The general election of this year was held on November 6. The county gave
for Congressman, Seventh District, James C. Needham, 788; W. D. Crichton, 1046;
for assemblyman, Fifty-seventh District, J. W. Haley, 1217; Thomas R. Scoon,
648. E. N. Rector was elected superior judge; A. B. Hamilton, supervisor from
District One; Thomas Price, supervisor from District Two; and George H.
Whitworth, supervisor from District Four. Judge Rector has held his office
continuously since, and George H. Whitworth's service as supervisor was
terminated only by his death in 1922.

On April 9, 1901, W. M. Davis was appointed constable in Township Three in
place of C. H. Wiley, resigned. On July 9, 1901, appears a new Township Six,
Gustine; Eugene McCabe was appointed justice of the peace, and B. W. Jeffers
constable, of Township Six on that date.

Paul Neumann continues as chairman of the board in 1900, but in 1901 A. B.
Hamilton succeeds him in that capacity. On August 11, 1902, G. R. Summers was
appointed justice of the peace of Township Five; and on September 15 of the same
year, W. F. Blewett was appointed constable of the same township to succeed J.
H. George, deceased.

At the general election on November 4, 1902, the county gave Gaston M. Ashe
1005 votes and J. C. Needham 819 for Congressman in the Sixth District; J. B.
Curtin 1241 votes for State senator, Twelfth District; and V. E. Bangs 1213 for
assemblyman, Twenty-fifth District. John S. McSwain was elected sheriff; W. B.
Croop, clerk; A. G. Clough, assessor; G. W. Kibby, treasurer; W. H. Cook,
auditor; S. J. Allen, recorder; E. H. Hoar, district attorney; Mrs. Anna Silman,
superintendent of schools; Arthur E. Cowell, surveyor; W. F. Clarke, tax
collector; G. E. Nordgren, coroner and public administrator; C. H. Deane,
supervisor from District Three; and W. H. Ogden, supervisor from District Five.
Justices of the peace were elected as follows: In Township One, J. A. Harrelson;
in Township Two, J. J. Griffin; in Township Three, C. S. Cothran; in Township
Four, J. D. Price; in Township Five, J. H. Sorensen; in Township Six, Eugene
McCabe. Edgar Latour was elected constable in Township One; J. H. McNamara, in
Township Two; W. M. Roberts, in Township Three; A. K. Ellett, in Township Four;
W. F. Blewett, in Township Five; and John Hickey, in Township Six.

In 1903, Thomas Price is chairman of the board. On August 4 of that year, C.
M. Harrelson was appointed justice of the peace in Township One to succeed J. A.
Harrelson, resigned. At the general election on November 8, 1904, the county
gave James C. Need-ham 880 votes for Congressman from the Sixth District and
William M. Conley 1026; S.. S. Burge 912 for assemblyman, Twenty-fifth District,
and Fred W. Yokum 937. Henry Nelson was elected super visor for District One; J.
R. Baxter, for District Two; and George H. Whitworth, for District Four. George
H. Whitworth was chairman of the board during 1905 and 1906.

On September 19, 1905, Henry Knight was appointed constable in Township Six
to succeed John Hickey, resigned.

On February 6, 1906, a new Township Seven appears, with the appointment of
Ambers Brown as justice of the peace and F. J. Clausen as constable. This is Dos
Palos, then quite newly colonized, thus making now three judicial townships on
the West Side and four on the East Side.

At the general election of November 6, 1906, the county gave J. C. Needham
1028 votes and H. A. Greene 919 for Congressman from the Sixth District; H. J.
Ostrander 948 and J. B. Curtin 1057, for State senator from the Twelfth
District; and R. K. Whitmore 894 and F. W. Yokum 1049, for assemblyman from the
Twenty-fifth District. John S. Swan was elected sheriff; P. J. Thornton, clerk;
A. G. Clough, assessor; G. W. Kibby, treasurer; W. H. Cook, auditor; S. J.
Allen, recorder; H. S. Shaffer, district attorney; Belle Smythe, superintendent
of schools; A. E. Cowell surveyor; W. F. Clarke, tax collector; G. E. Nordgren,
coroner and public administrator; C. H. Deane, supervisor from District Three;
and J. W. Haley, supervisor from District Five. I. J. Buckley was elected
justice of the peace in Township One; J. J. Griffin, in Township Two; W. E.
Burch, in Township Three; J. D. Price, in Township Four; J. N. Hitchcock, in
Township Five; Eugene McCabe, in Township Six; and J. S. Sitton, in Township
Seven. Edgar Latour was elected constable in Township One; J. H. McNamara, in
Township Two; W. M. Roberts, in Township Three; G. A. Watson, in Township Five;
B. W. Jeffers, in Township Six; and F. J. Clausen, in Township Seven. There was
a tie in Township Four; and at a special election on December 1, W. C. Wilson
was elected constable of that township.

J. R. Baxter appears as chairman of the board of supervisors in 1907, and
continues through that year and 1908. On January 9, 1907, I. J. Buckley was
appointed justice of the peace of Township One, and Edgar Latour constable, to
take effect October 1, 1907. They were the incumbents, elected the previous
fall. Their election appears to have been considered good until October 1, 1907;
and as the appointment could not apparently have been to cure an invalid
election, it was probably to effect a change in salary. On October 1, 1907, C.
B. Harrell was appointed county recorder to succeed S. J. Allen, resigned. On
April 27, 1908, E. F. Mugler was appointed auditor to succeed William H. Cook,
deceased; and on June 1 of the same year, Frank J. McInerny was appointed to
succeed Mugler, resigned.

At the general election on November 3, 1908, the county gave James C. Needham
1087 votes and Fred P. Feliz 1020 for Congressman from the Sixth District, and
Charles W. Wagner 988 and John R. Richardson 1047 for assemblyman from the
Twenty-fifth District. E. N. Rector was elected superior judge; Thomas H.
Scand-rett, supervisor from District One; J. R. Baxter, supervisor from District
Two; and George H. Whitworth, supervisor from District Four. On December 8,
1908, W. F. Meredith was appointed justice of the peace of Township Six in place
of Eugene McCabe, resigned.

In 1909 and 1910, C. H. Deane was chairman of the board. On March 11, 1909,
A. L. Silman was appointed auditor to succeed Frank J. McInerny, resigned.

At the general election on November 8, 1910, the county gave J. C. Needham
1037 votes for Congressman from the Sixth District, and A. L. Cowell, the
present attorney for the Merced Irrigation District, 1264; L. L. Dennett, for
State senator from the Twelfth District, 1071, and J. B. Curtin 1207; D. D.
Thompson 1045 for assemblyman from the Twenty-fifth District, and J. J. Griffin
1154. S. C. Cornell was elected sheriff; H. S. Shaffer, district attorney; P. J.
Thornton, clerk; L. R. Johnson, auditor; G. W. Kibby, treasurer; A. G. Clough,
assessor; W. H. Wegner, tax collector; Margaret Sheehy, superintendent of
schools; A. E. Cowell, surveyor; G. E. Nordgren, coroner and public
administrator; H. G. Peck, supervisor from District Three; and C. S. Cothran,
supervisor from District Five. In Judicial Township One, I. J. Buckley was
elected justice of the peace and Edgar Latour, constable; in Township Two, W. B.
Croop, justice, and J. H. McNamara, constable; in Township Three, W. E. Burch,
justice, and W. M. Roberts, constable; in Township Four, L. S. Cardwell,
justice, and W. C. Wilson, constable; in Township Five, J. N. Hitchcock,
justice, and J. A. Watson, constable; in Township Six, C. F. Reutter, justice,
and T. J. Hazelwood, constable; and in Township Seven, J. S. Sitton, justice,
and Clyde Painter, constable.

T. H. Scandrett appears as chairman of the board in 1912. At the general
election on November 5 of that year, J. C. Needham received in this county 1482
votes for Congressman from the Seventh District (note the reapportionment
following the census year 1910), and Denver S. Church 1835. George Marchbank
received in the county 1358 votes for assemblyman from the Forty-ninth District,
and J. J. Griffin 1884. T. H. Scandrett was elected supervisor from District
One; D. K. Thornton, supervisor from District Two; and G. H. Whitworth,
supervisor from District Four.

On May 6, 1913, J. J. Garibaldi was appointed tax collector in place of W. H.
Wegner, deceased; and on June 1, 1914, T. A. Mack was appointed sheriff to
succeed S. C. Cornell, deceased.

At the general election held November 3, 1914, the county gave Francis J.
Heney 1174 votes for United States Senator, Joseph R. Knowland 1476, and James
D. Phelan 2002; Denver S. Church 2614 and A. M. Drew 1752 for Congressman from
the Seventh District; A. P. Ferguson 2499 and L. J. Maddux 2462 for State
senator from the Twelfth District; and Edward Stanton Ellis 3456 and Ernest D.
Kahl 1486 for assemblyman from the Forty-ninth District. E. N. Rector was
elected superior judge; T. A. Mack, sheriff; C. H McCray, district attorney; P.
J. Thornton, clerk; G. W. Kibby, treasurer; L. R. Johnson, auditor; A. G.
Clough, assessor; James J. Garibaldi, tax collector; J. C. Ivers, recorder; G.
E. Nordgren, coroner and public administrator; Margaret Sheehy, superintendent
of schools; A. E. Cowell, surveyor; Frank Pebley, supervisor from District One;
and C. S. Cothran, supervisor from District Five. J. C. Larsen was elected
justice of the peace and Edgar Latour, constable, in Township One; Frank H.
Farrar, justice, and J. H. Mc-Namara, constable, in Township Two; L. A. Sischo,
justice, and W. M. Roberts, constable, in Township Three; J. D. Price, justice,
and W. C. Wilson, constable, in Township Four; J. N. Hitchcock, justice, and
August E. Warn, constable, in Township Five; C. F. Reutter, justice, and J. T.
Hazelwood, constable, in Township Six; J. S. Sitton, justice, and T. C. Painter,
constable, in Township Seven; and W. H. Osborn, justice, and E. W. Fulkerth,
constable, in Township Eight.

Judicial Township Eight appears in an election here for the first time.
Justice Osborn and Constable Fulkerth have held their offices continuously since
the creation of the township, Atwater, ten years ago. W. C. Wilson won the
office of constable in Township Four only after an election contest.

At the general election on November 7, 1916, the county gave Hiram W. Johnson
2635 votes for United States Senator and George S. Patton 1495 ; Denver S.
Church, for Congressman from the Seventh District, 2279 and W. W. Phillips 1769;
H. Kylberg, for assembly man from the Forty-ninth District, 2729, and Walter C.
Maloy 1712. T. H. Scandrett was elected supervisor from District One; D. K.
Thornton, supervisor from District Two; and George H. Whitworth, supervisor from
District Four. T. H. Scandrett continues as chairman of the board.

On November 13, 1916, Winifred H. Bigley was appointed county librarian for a
four-year term beginning on November 16. This is not the beginning of Miss
Bigley's service as librarian, however.

On August 7, 1917, W. M. Griffin was appointed coroner and public
administrator to succeed G. E. Nordgren, deceased. On October 7, 1918, Mrs. M.
A. Clough was appointed assessor to succeed her husband, A. G. Clough, deceased.

At the general election on November 5, 1918, the county gave Henry Hawson
2098 votes and H. E. Barbour 1801 for Congressman from the Seventh District; J.
B. Curtin 1964 and L. L. Dennett 1977, for State senator from the Twelfth
District; and Guy Windrem 2871, for assemblyman from the Forty-ninth District.
P. J. Thornton was elected clerk; T. A. Mack, sheriff; C. W. Croop, district
attorney; Smith E. Acker, auditor; G. W. Kibby, treasurer; F. A. Robinson,
assessor; J. J. Garibaldi, tax collector; J. C. Ivers, recorder; W. M. Griffin,
coroner and public administrator; A. E. Cowell, surveyor; Mrs. Belle Smythe
Gribi, superintendent of schools; Frank Pebley, supervisor from District Three;
and C. S. Cothran, supervisor from District Five. In Township One, I. J. Buckley
was elected justice and Edgar Latour, constable; in Township Two, Frank H.
Farrar, justice, and J. H. McNamara, constable; in Township Three, W. H. Purdy,
justice, and C. M. Watkins, constable; in Township Four, C. T. Dooley, justice,
and W. C. Wilson, constable; in Township Five, J. N. Hitchcock, justice, and
August E. Warn, constable; in Township Six, H. K. Morris, justice, and Oliver F.
Carey, constable; in Township Seven, Ernest E. Winters, justice, and T. G.
Arbuthnot, constable; and in Township Eight, W. H. Osborn, justice, and E. W.
Fulkerth, constable.

On February 3, 1919, F. H. Cronwell was appointed justice of the peace in
Township Three. On February 2, 1920, John R. Graham was appointed by Governor
Stephens supervisor in District One to succeed T. H. Scandrett, resigned. Mr.
Scandrett had been chairman up to this time; Frank Pebley succeeded him as
chairman and is the present chairman. On June 10, 1920, H. K. Landram was
appointed district attorney to succeed C. W. Croop, resigned. On July 7, 1920,
Charles A. Miller was appointed justice of the peace of Township Six to succeed
H. K. Morris, resigned.

At the general election on November 2, 1920, the county gave Samuel M.
Shortridge 2549 votes for United States Senator; H. E. Barbour 3570 for
Congressman from the Seventh District, and Guy Windrem 2838 for assemblyman from
the Forty-ninth District. E. N. Rector was elected superior judge; Frank R.
Henderson, supervisor from District One; D. K. Thornton, supervisor from
District Two; and G. H. Whitworth, supervisor from District Four.

On November 9, 1920, G. D. Soper was appointed constable for Township Three
in place of C. M. Watkins, resigned. On April 5, 1921, J. L. Mulkey was
appointed constable of Township Seven in place of T. G. Arbuthnot, resigned. On
August 1, 1921, Winifred H. Bigley was reappointed county librarian for four
years. On September 6, 1921, J. W. Hall was appointed justice of the peace of
Township Five to succeed J. N. Hitchcock, deceased. On April 4, 1922, Harold
Bone was appointed justice of the peace of Township Two to succeed Frank H.
Farrar, deceased. On August 7, 1922, G. E. Winton was appointed county surveyor
to succeed A. E. Cowell, resigned. On October 23, 1922, W. E. Bunker was
appointed by Governor Stephens supervisor for District Four to succeed G. H.
Whitworth, deceased.

At the general election on November 7, 1922, the county gave Hiram W. Johnson
4090 votes for United States Senator, Harry E. Barbour 3955 for Congressman from
the Seventh District, L. L. Dennett 3763 for State senator from the Twelfth
District, and D. C. Williams 3096 and Guy Windrem 2135 for assemblyman from the
Forty-ninth District. C. S. Weaver was elected superintendent of schools; T. A.
Mack, sheriff; C. H. McCray, district attorney; S. E. Acker, auditor; G. W.
Kibby, treasurer; F. A. Robinson, assessor; J. J. Garibaldi, tax collector; J.
C. Ivers, recorder; W. M. Griffin, coroner and public administrator; W. E.
Bedesen, surveyor; Frank Pebley, supervisor from District Three; and G. B.
Smith, supervisor from District Five. In Township One, I. J. Buckley was elected
justice of the peace and Edgar Latour, constable; in Township Two, Harold Bone,
justice, and J. H. McNamara, constable; in Township Three, F. H. Cronwell,
justice, and G. D. Soper, constable; in Township Four, C. T. Dooley, justice,
and W. C. Wilson, constable; in Township Five, T. W. Pedigo, justice, and Dave
Bennett, constable; in Township Six, D. E. Hales, justice, and Oliver Carey,
constable; in Township Seven, H. Boyd Smith, justice, and John R. Campbell, Jr.,
constable; in Township Eight, W. H. Osborn, justice, and E. W. Fulkerth, constable.

On June 4, 1923, Essae M. Culver was appointed county librarian to succeed
Winifred H. Bigley, deceased. On September 4, 1923, John R. Campbell, Jr., was
appointed constable of Township Seven. On February 9, 1924, C. E. Welch was
appointed coroner and public administrator to succeed W. M. Griffin, deceased,
and E. D. Huffman was appointed constable of Township Two to succeed J. H.
McNamara, deceased.

At the general election on November 4, 1924, the county gave H. E. Barbour,
for Congressman from the Seventh District, 3942 votes; and D. C. Williams, for
assemblyman from the Forty-ninth District, 3021 and E. G. Adams 2725. F. R.
Henderson was elected supervisor from District One; J. C. Maddux, supervisor
from District Two; and W. E. Bunker, supervisor from District Four. No other
changes have occurred up to December 21, 1924.



Additional Comments:
Extracted from:

HISTORY OF
MERCED COUNTY
CALIFORNIA
WITH A
Biographical Review
OF
The Leading Men and Women of the County Who Have Been
Identified with Its Growth and Development
from the Early Days to the Present

HISTORY BY
JOHN OUTCALT

ILLUSTRATED COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME
HISTORIC RECORD COMPANY
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
1925


File at: http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ca/merced/history/1925/historyo/countyof332ms.txt

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