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Archiver > CHASE > 2003-02 > 1045483252


From: "KEITH HUME" <>
Subject: Re: [CHASE-L] Edward Chace in Patagonia
Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2003 12:00:52 -0000
References: <200302161535.h1GFZkv03083@stroopwafel.amaze.nl> <002b01c2d614$21dfcbc0$29c19c3f@2gvbk01>


Hi,
Just a reminder that the greater part of the CHASE/CHACE Chronicles are on
the CHASE/CHACE website at
http://chase.genealogysurnames.com
There are over 300 articles categorised and indexed there. In addition ther
are also scanned images of pages.
When I have finished the 1880 CHASE/CHACE and derivatives Index I will
return to the conversion of Lonnie Chase's complete Chronicles
transcriptions,
Keith Hume
----- Original Message -----
From: "Renogen" <>
To: <>
Sent: Sunday, February 16, 2003 11:35 PM
Subject: Re: [CHASE-L] Edward Chace in Patagonia


> Hi - I am sorry that I cannot help you with your question re: Edward
Chase -
> but, I am most anxious to know more about the Chase Chronicles....What,
> where, how to obtain, etc.....Any help appreciated, Phyl in Reno.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Jeffrey Chace" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Sunday, February 16, 2003 7:35 AM
> Subject: [CHASE-L] Edward Chace in Patagonia
>
>
> > Hello,
> >
> > Does anyone have any information on the lineage of Edward Chace,
> originally
> > from Taunton, who ended up in Patagonia from 1898 into the 1920s? Below
> is
> > what the Chase Chronicles has to say about him.
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Jeffrey Chace
> > http://home.wanadoo.nl/j.b.chace
> >
> > A Note From The Chronicles- July-Oct.- 1932
> >
> > EDWARD CHACE'S STORY AS TOLD IN
> > "A YANKEE IN PATAGONIA"
> >
> > Taunton Man Puts in Some Wild Tenderfoot Days With the
> > Tough Gauchos of Patagonia and Comes Home to Write
> > A Book About It.
> >
> > by H. F. Manchester
> > (Boston Sunday Herald, July 12, 1931)
> >
> > Ned Chace is now back in Taunton, trying the quiet life for a change.
> >
> > Chace shipped before the mast out of Boston in '97. He was ship's
> carpenter
> > on a little schooner. They sailed the South Shetlands, near the tip of
> > South America.
> >
> > Chace intended to be back in Boston within a few months, but with one
> thing
> > and another he got held up for 31 years. For one thing, the Captain was
> > drunk all the time, and Chace got sick of it. So when the skipper pulled
> > himself together and sent ashore for his crew, Chace was a few miles up
> the
> > hills of Patagonia.
> >
> > Patagonia, which is even now pretty close to the world's jumping-off
> place,
> > was then a little bit wilder, if possible, Chace saw strange animals,
> > strange Indians and stranger white men. He hunted pumas in their caves,
> ate
> > ostriches and herded sheep by the thousand. He rode with renegade
> > Englishmen and light-hearted Spanish gauchos with silver-handled knives
at
> > their belts.
> >
> > It was there the Barretts ran into him. The Barretts -Robert and
> > Katherine - spent their time traveling in strange places and now and
then
> > they write a book. Chace had no idea that he was worth a book, but once
> > they got him out of the wilds and started him talking, he wore out a
crew
> of
> > stenographers.
> >
> > Now Ulysses is home from his wanderings. Much has been seen and heard
and
> > this time he lives to see the saga in print. "A Yankee in Patagonia" is
> the
> > name of the book and it is just off the presses of Houghton Mifflin.
> > Patagonia, as we have said, was a pretty wild place. It was a land of
> > horses, desperadoes, bar-rooms and killings. There were few women in the
> > country and bleached skeletons of rival lovers decorated the arroyos
near
> > their homes.
> >
> > Those who have enjoyed accounts of the vivid range life
> > of our own West in the early days, with its occasional ferocity and its
> > madcap pranks, will find in the narrative of Chace the same lawless
spirit
> > of adventure.
> >
> > There was a crowd of gauchos with whom Chace threw dice for his drinks
in
> > the wayside bar-room, or "boliche", of one Dona Gregoria. Not far from
the
> > shack as he approached, he saw some of those fresh-looking skulls he had
> > been told about.
> >
> > It was a strangely mixed crowd. There were Spaniards, Argentines,
> Chileans,
> > Irishman, English, Scotch and German. All were armed to the teeth.
> >
> > That was not an alarming symptom - it was merely a custom of the
country.
> > Those of the Spanish strain had knives in their belts - the others
relied
> > upon pistols . Chace didn't like the knives. "A man wouldn't mind
gettin'
> > shot or something like that," he explained, "but when I saw a hand go
> toward
> > a knife I always figured it was time to do something quick."
> >
> > Chace was a newcomer, a tenderfoot. He heard men brag of killings in
their
> > drinks, but smiles up his sleeve. He thought they were spoofing. He
> > thought that one man known widely as "Matasiete, Killer of Seven." had
> > probably killed seven sheep. Later he was glad that his laugh was up his
> > sleeve.
> >
> > For a laugh meant a fight to those men, who were always ready to drink
> with
> > each other, but whose personal honor was a precariously balanced affair.
> >
> >
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> >
> >
>
>
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