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Archiver > CHOATE > 1999-05 > 0926173736


From: barbara <>
Subject: (Intro to Choate Family in Barefoot/Withrow Book)
Date: Sat, 08 May 1999 09:28:56 -0500


Intro to Choate Family in Barefoot/Withrow Book

"Barefoot and Withrow Family", by Anne and Vivian Daughterty, Litho in
USA by Ray L. Stanphill, Dallas, Texas, 1966

pp, 121-122

The Choate Family

John Tipton Barefoot's mother was Nancy Choate, the daughter of Thomas
Kyle and Elizabeth Renfro Choate.

For many years we knew only that she was Nancy Choate who had married
first Dillon Barefoot, and then a Mr. Spurlock, that John Tipton
Barefoot had a first cousin named James Monroe Choate to whom he was
very close as they grew up together, and that John Tipton's half sister,
Nancy Anne Spurlock, had married her cousin, John Choate,and his half
sister, Hetty Spurlock, had married first a Lyons, then her cousin,
James Choate, brother of John Choate. Later from John Tipton's papers
we learned that Nancy Choate Barefoot Spurlock had a brother, Squire
Edward Choate, and that John Tipton's other uncles were Ephraim Grisham,
Lion Smart, "Boss" Sharp, etc. The latter three were all
brothers-in-law of Nancy Choate Barefoot.

>From Squire Edward Choate's descendants we learned that Squire Edward's
parents were Thomas Kyle Choate and Elizabeth Renfro of Lawrence County,
Tennessee, and that Thomas Kyle's parents were Thomas Choate and
Elizabeth Keith of Virginia. For some time we could find nothing
further. Joseph Hodges Choate in his story of his family said that his
ancestor, John Choate, was the progenitor of all people of the name
Choate in America. We could not, however, tie in the Virginia family
with this New England family although they may have been of the same
family in England.

Then came Mr. Sid Cox of College Station, Texas, whose wife is a great
granddaughter of James Monroe Choate. Mr. Cox has done an enormous
amount of research on the Choates, as has Mr. Donald Choate of El Paso,
Arkansas.

Mr. Cox tells us that the first of our family who came to America was
Christopher Chotte who arrived in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, on the
good ship Cecilius in 1676. His arrival was authenticated by the
signature of Charles Baltimore. Christopher died in Anne Arundel County
in 1692. Christopher's son, Christopher, known in records as
Christopher, Sr., left Baltimore County, Maryland, and moved to
Lunenburg County, Virginia, with Christopher, Jr., Richard, and Sabret
Choate, who appear to be his sons. Christopher, Jr., had Sons
Christopher, wo went to McNairy COunty, Tennessee, and Thomas, who
married Elizabeth Keith. According to family legend, Thomas was killed
by the Tories during the Revolutionary War. One version says he was
killed at Old Fort Dinwiddie, Virginia, while another says he was killed
in South Carolina.

Many of the Choate family moved westward into Tennessee and these
included Thomas' son, Thomas Kyle Choate, wo finally settled in Lawrence
County, Tennessee. Thomas Kyle married Elizabeth Renfro and his brother
John married Eleanor Renfro, presumably a sister of Elizabeth. There
were numerous Choates in various counties of Tennessee, all apparently
related.

>From Tennessee the Choate descendants moved into Arkansas, Texas,
Oklahoma (or the Indian Territory) and, of course, from here have moved
all over the United States.

>From practically no material at all on the Choates we have now an
immense amount of material which owuld probably fill a book by itself.
That is what we may do with it at some later date.

Family anecdotes on the Choate family are many and colorful. Mr. Cox
has written and printed some sketches on the Choates in South Texas.
References to Monroe Choate and his sons in connection with ranching and
the trail drives are to be found in various books, such as "The Chisholm
Trail," by Wayne Gard, University of Oklahoma Press, 1954 (pp. 38-39,
48-49, 144 and 210-211), "The Trail Drivers of Texas," by J. Marvin
Hunter (pp. 119, 417-19), "America's Heartland, the Southwest," by Green
Peyton, University of Oklahoma Press, 1948 (pp. 76-78), etc.

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