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Archiver > COOK-CO-IL > 2009-03 > 1238066837


From: Frank & Sheila <>
Subject: Re: [COOK-CO-IL] Scotland to Chicago
Date: Thu, 26 Mar 2009 11:27:17 +0000
References: <529621.94174.qm@web112208.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
In-Reply-To: <529621.94174.qm@web112208.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>


Laura, that is so interesting. I am going to visit the bookshops and see
if I can find any books about Chicago here in England. I too remember
collecting rags and taking them to the yard and being paid a few pence
which no doubt my mum was glad of. We recycled well in the 1940's! In
Edinburgh, we also had vans coming around selling meat and groceries,
saving us going into town.

Sheila.

Laura Aanenson wrote:
> I have to add to this thread because I find the topic fascinating too. Much of my research of late has been trying to capture my ancestors' lives as they lived them. Horse and buggy, streetcars etc.
>
>
> My library (here in Minnesota) has a four-part DVD series called Chicago. Each disk was a couple hours long, but they were positively wonderful! The story begins when Chicago was no more than a bog and continues for decades. Includes the slaughterhouses and lumberyards on the lakefront, railroads, the El, raising the buildings for sewer lines, immigrant labor, the Great Fire, etc. I highly recommend it.
>
> I recently read a book (great for work day lunch hours) called "In Their Own Words, Letters from Norwegian Immigrants" edited and translated by Solveig Zemple. Some of the people settled in small towns, and others in big cities, but all their letters tell of everyday happenings that make the writers come to life. One young immigrant woman arrived at the train station and there was no one there to meet her. A kind Swede stumbled through the language differences to help her reach her destination. Makes you realize how vulnerable our ancestors were and how helpful to one another. Helpful, kind of like this list! ;-)
>
> Someone on a list (was it this one?) recommended reading "Challenging Chicago, Coping with Everyday Life, 1837-1920" by Perry R Duis. Requires a little more concentration than the aforementioned book, but equally as interesting. How Michigan Avenue was a mass of people, horses, carts, store signs, and more - making it nearly imppossible to get from Point A to Point B. How street vendors and peddlers hawked their wares. How that made life easier because traveling was so difficult. My mom said even when she was growing up in the 30's they had the rag man on their street.
>
> The developers in the suburbs used to pay for families to ride the train out to the 'burbs and have a picnic on Sunday so they could convince you to buy one of their newly constructed houses. 'See how easy it is to commute? And you don't have the congestion of the city.'
>
> The Norwegian book tells about how quickly word spread about when and where work became available. Almost as fast as we are with our computers. John P Colletta, author of "They Came in Ships" said when the immigration law was changed to only admit people who were literate, the word spread like wildfire across Europe. From then on, every ship carried only people who could read. ;-)
>
> Just another limb,
>
> Laura
>
> Searching for Clarke, Klarin, Landstrom, Littrell, Mangels, Mueller, Schmitt, Tolf, and Walton
>
> www.LivinginthePastLane.com
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Sandra <>
> To: Cook List <>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 10:24:35 AM
> Subject: [COOK-CO-IL] Scotland to Chicago
>
> My G-Grandfather was a master stonemason from Co. Down, N. Ireland. His ancestors had crossed the channel from Scotland to N.. Ireland in the 1700's.
> I'm certain that my G-Grand came to Chicago to help rebuild the city after the Great Chicago fire.
>
> A N. Ireland cousin found a Newtownards newspaper article about many of my ancestors who came to America. They came to Castle Garden, the New York port, and then traveled by train to Rock Island, IL. This was a main railroad hub. Many new immigrants worked for the railroad when they first arrived. The immigrants worked hard, saved their money and helped others from the homeland to immigrate.
>
> Few immigrants woke up one morning and decided to go to Rock Island or St. Louis or anywhere else. They had a plan. Others had come before them. They knew there were jobs or cheap land.
>
> Some of my ancestors farmed large tracks of land around Rock Island. Then they moved to Iowa. Why? Cheap land. Iowa was offering cheap farmland to populate the state. My ancestors jumped at the opportunity. There is ALWAYS a reason and a plan for any moves. Finding that reason will aid in your research.
>
> My German immigrants first settled in Shawnee Village, OH. They were miners. I found out that the mine owners went to Germany to seek experienced mine workers. Ohio mine owners advertised in German newpapers for labor. They paid for the families passage to America and housed the employed workers and their families. This was a great opportunity for Germans who wished to leave the Homeland.
>
> Sandra
>
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