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Archiver > CORNISH > 1999-12 > 0944402459


From: <>
Subject: PARTY: The Sans Day Carol (or St Day Carol) and others
Date: Sun, 5 Dec 1999 09:00:59 EST


Dear List

I'm not attending the party, but I do enjoy some music. When I find Dr Ralph
Dunstan's Book of Christmas Carols I'll see what I can find, carol wise (it's
about 70 years old and is at Mum's and she is on holiday). Also, please put
me down as an alto for Handel's Messiah. I have sung it three times and have
my own copy of the score (somewhere).

Dr Ralph Dunstan was married to my grampa's Aunty Janey (Eliza Jane JULEFF
born April 1863, Truro) and produced several books of Cornish songs as well
as writing a requiem for his son and son in law who were killed in the First
World War. He was born in Carnon Downs and is buried at Perranzabuloe.

Meanwhile, here's the Sans Day Carol copied from the Oxford Book of Carols
which says The Sans Day or St Day Carol has been so named because the melody
and the first three verses were taken down at St Day in the parish of
Gwennap, Cornwall. St Day or St They was a Breton Saint whose cult was
widely spread in Armorican Cornwall. We owe the carol to the kindness of the
Rev G H Doble to whom Mr W D Watson sang it after hearing an old man, Mr
Thomas Beard, sing it at St Day. A version in Cornish was subsequently
published (Ma gron war'n gelinen') with a fourth stanza, here translated and
added to Mr Beard's English version.


Now the holly bears a berry as white as the milk
And Mary bore Jesus who was wrapped up in silk

And Mary bore Jesus Christ our Saviour for to be
And the first tree in the greenwood it was the holly, holly, holly
And the first tree in the greenwood it was the holly

Now the holly bears a berry as green as the grass
And Mary bore Jesus who died on the cross

And Mary bore Jesus Christ our Saviour for to be
And the first tree in the greenwood it was the holly, holly, holly
And the first tree in the greenwood it was the holly

Now the holly bears a berry as black as the coal
And Mary bore Jesus who died for us all

And Mary bore Jesus Christ our Saviour for to be
And the first tree in the greenwood it was the holly, holly, holly
And the first tree in the greenwood it was the holly

Now the holly bears a berry, as blood it is red
Then trust we our Savour who rose from the dead

And Mary bore Jesus Christ our Saviour for to be
And the first tree in the greenwood it was the holly, holly, holly
And the first tree in the greenwood it was the holly


Now, as to the tune, I may not be able to do this, so perhaps Debs Waller can
assist. The notes start with the E flat on the bottom line (I'll type top E
and top D in lower case to distinguish them - also note the spaces are not
bar lines but sort of phrasing marks, according to the way I sing it). I
hope you will excuse me if I do not include the harmonies, just the tune.
This is taking me ages and I wasn't even coming to your party.

It is written in the key of C minor (E flat major? Debs - HELP!! ).
Anyway, it has three flats, is in 3 4 time and the key to notes is:

D - below bottom line
E flat - bottom line
F - above it
G - above that
A flat - above that
B flat - above that
C - above that
d - octave above the other one
e - ditto

Again, note the Es, Bs and As are flat.

Verse: EGBBBAGE GAFDE EGBBBAGE G(G)AFDE
Chorus: EGBBCdeeBBBBCde EGBBBAGEGAFDE FF FE EGBBBAGEGAFDE

Now for the timing - I don't know about the speed, because it doesn't say on
the music, and I haven't seen my metronome since we moved house last year so
I can't work it out. It has to be at least eighteen years since I have done
anything like this, and I hope I don't have my note values muddled up, but I
refuse to be responsible for any errors and omissions or for any awful noises
you end up making.

Dotted crotchet, semi quaver/ crotchet, crotchet, dotted crotchet, semi
quaver/ crotchet crotchet crotchet/ minim, quaver, quaver/ crotchet,
crotchet, quaver, quaver/ crotchet, crotchet, quaver quaver (tied where
applicable)/ crotchet crotchet crotchet/ minim (not dotted for those who are
counting, see on!)// Quaver, quaver (tied)/ crotchet, crotchet, quaver,
quaver (tied)/ quaver quaver, crotchet, crotchet/ crotchet, crotchet, quaver,
quaver (tied)/ minim, quaver, quaver/ crotchet, crotchet, quaver quaver/
crotchet, crotchet, crotchet/crotchet, crotchet, crotchet/ minim,
crotchet/minim, crotchet/minim, quaver, quaver/ crotchet, crotchet, quaver,
quaver/crotchet, crotchet, crotchet/crotchet, crotchet, crotchet/minim.

For those of you who need a translation (and as I remember it):

whole note = semibreve (four beats)
half note = minim (two beats)
quarter note = crotchet (one beat)
eighth note = quaver (half beat)
sixteenth note - semiquaver (quarter beat)

This has just taken me the best part of an hour. I hope it works (I shall
probably never know unless someone who has never heard it before phones me up
and sings/plays to me down the phone).

Happy singing, people.

Alison Stevens, Truro, Cornwall


http://members.aol.com/alisonams/ams_fam.htm
Cornwall FHS #9593

Researching: BREWER (Liskeard area and possibly St Breock), TRATHEN
(Lanlivery/St Blazey area), BECKERLEG (Gwennap area), DUMBLE (St
Neot/Liskeard area)
Struggling with: DAVEY (St Blazey area), TRELOAR (Helston area)
Starting to research: JULEFF (Truro/St Clements), CROWLE (Truro area)

Not researching: STEVENS anywhere in Cornwall (my husband's family originated
in London and in any event I am only back to 1897!!)

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