CORNISH-L Archives

Archiver > CORNISH > 2007-12 > 1197113691


From: "Brian Millett" <>
Subject: Re: [CORNISH] Weekly Newspaper. 20th September, 1844. News.
Date: Sat, 8 Dec 2007 22:34:51 +1100
In-Reply-To: <000001c83971$ef64afa0$24d2403e@f5s4e5>


It's interesting that recently I attended a Masonic funeral for an old
Masonic gardener who tended many of the roses in our town and we scattered
rose petals into the open grave. The action had a double meaning to it!
I've just been looking at Charles Winpenny's recent photographs of the sea
off Cornwall and it is certainly looking wild.
>From Brian of Yass nr Canberra, Australia where we have had wonderful rain
which has greened the country amazingly - a marked contrast to one year ago
when we were expecting bushfires.

-----Original Message-----
From: [mailto:] On
Behalf Of Brian Harris
Sent: Saturday, December 08, 2007 7:10 PM
To:
Subject: Re: [CORNISH] Weekly Newspaper. 20th September, 1844. News.


Ater a quick Gogle I found an account of a funeral on the Isle of Man , part
of the obituary reads as follows > At the close of the service, as is
customary, the Oddfellows and Freemasons respectively dropped sprigs of
thyme and accacia into the grave. The floral tributes here numerous and
beautiful, and in themselves an assurance of the very high esteem in which
the deceased was held.< So a custon of the Oddfellow and Free Masons it
wuld seem. Brian in a storm lashed Cornwall where gales of 80 - 90- mph
forcast :-(

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dawn Williams" <>
To: <>
Sent: Saturday, December 08, 2007 1:51 AM
Subject: Re: [CORNISH] Weekly Newspaper. 20th September, 1844. News.


> A fortunate man, Mr. Chawner. This is the first I've heard of throwing
> sprigs of thyme into the grave. Could someone please explain the
> significance of this custom? Is the custom particularly Cornish, or
> done
in
> other parts of the UK as well? Is it still done today?
> Thanks in advance,
> Dawn
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "harris" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Friday, December 07, 2007 9:57 AM
> Subject: [CORNISH] Weekly Newspaper. 20th September, 1844. News.
>
>
> West Briton and Cornwall Advertiser, Friday, 20th September, 1844.
>
> FUNERAL OF THE LATE Mr. CHAWNER - On Tuesday last, the remains of
> this talented and lamented gentleman were interred at Phillack, near
> Hayle,
with
> that pure simplicity which so silently and forcibly speaks of living
[..?].
> Preceded by the officiating minister, and others, and by the Lodge of
> Odd Fellows, his body was followed to the grave by his most intimate
> friends
as
> mourners, and by between two and three thousand persons. After the
service
> had been ended, the Odd Fellows, who were dressed in black, and wore
> black silk sashes, white gloves and white aprons trimmed with black
> silk
ribbons,
> divided their pairs, and as they passed on either side of the grave,
> each member dropped into it a sprig of thyme. They then formed in
> procession, and, after having returned with the mourners to the house
> of bereavement, repaired to their lodge. Thus was buried a stranger
> who came among strangers, and who, by his ability and virtues, won the
> affection of all men. Subscriptions are being made for the purpose of
> erecting a monument
to
> his memory.
>
>
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