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From: <>
Subject: Re: Smoots, Durhams and Hunts redeux
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 1997 10:21:38 -0500 (EST)


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There's a little girl on my lap, I forgot to hit attach on the last e-mail!

Michelle Ule

Ukiah, CA

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Hunts, Durhams and Smoots
=0D

Bermuda is a complex of 150 islands well east of the Virginia coast in t=
he Atlantic Ocean. In 1503 a group of Spanish mariners were blown off co=
urse and shipwrecked on the major island. They eventually were rescued a=
nd nothing much happened on the archipelago until British colonists on th=
eir way to Virginia were shipwrecked over a hundred years later.
The British decided to stay and in 1612 the islands were included in the=
third charter of the Virginia Company. The history of Bermuda is of som=
e interest to our family because the warm waters, sunny skies and hope of=
fortune brought the Hunts and the Durhams there in the early Seventeenth=
century.
Many attempts to trace the Hunt and Durham families to Bermuda and back =
have been attempted but little hard evidence has been found except for in=
formation in the Latter Day Saints Churches' International Genealogical I=
ndex (IGI). The pedigree charts from the church show us descending from =
one Governor Richard Hunt, presumably a governor of Bermuda, who lived on=
the island after 1627 (when he married Francis Grimsditch in St. Giles C=
hurch, London) and through at least 1643 (when daughter Judith is believe=
d to have been born there).
Also in Bermuda at the same time was Thomas Durham, a Pittingdon, Devon,=
native who married in Port Royal, Bermuda about 1627. His son Henry was=
born there circa 1629-1634.
Henry Durham and Judith Hunt undoubtedly knew each other growing up in P=
ort Royal and are believed to have married there on Valentine's Day, 1660=
=2E Their first son, Thomas Durham, was born March 6, 1661 in Port Royal=
and at some point the family appears to have moved to Richmond County, V=
irginia.
The list of children found through the Latter Day Saints Family History =
Center doesn't make any sense, so it won't be included here. Sufficient =
to say Thomas Durham met Dorothy Smoot in Richmond County and they were m=
arried in North Farnham Parish.
=

*
=0D
Dorothy Smoot also has a puzzling ancestry. Believed to be the daughter=
of William and Jane Smoot, she is thought to be the granddaughter of Wil=
liam Smoot, the original Smoot in America. =

William Smoot the elder, was born about 1596 in London and was a member =
of the Boat wright Guild when he was asked to come to Virginia in 1633. =
He was contracted to perform 50 days worth of labor for Colonel Thomas Bu=
rbage at Hampton on the York River. Once he made the arduous trip and lo=
oked around, he decided to stay and build up his own business.
He first obtained land on February 24, 1642 in payment for transporting =
eight individuals into the colony. Smoot was granted 400 acres of land n=
ear the head of Tymber Creek on the north side of Charles River in York C=
ounty. Harry Wright Newman, the author of The Smoots of Maryland and Vir=
ginia, believes William Smoot was bringing his family and some indentured=
servants into the colony at the time.
Smoot seems to have established his boat yard in good order, paying off =
one indentured servant, George Codd, in 1644 with "three barrels of corn =
and clothes". As a citizen of the fledgling colony, he also fought the P=
amunky and Chickahominy Indians. He received 600 pounds of tobacco for h=
is efforts. He undoubtedly needed the money for that same year he was su=
ed in court for 854 pounds of tobacco owed to Ashwell Batten.
There are several references in the records of Smoot suing and being sue=
d, perhaps it was a necessary part of business in those days!
About 1646, William Smoot packed up his family and moved north to Maryla=
nd. He was granted a patent for 300 acres in 1647 for land near the mout=
h of Herring Creek on the Potomac River. Later, he settled on 400 acres =
of land known as "Smoothly", which he received for transporting his then-=
wife Grace, her daughter Elizabeth Wood, and his children Thomas, Richard=
,Elizabeth, Anne and Alice as well as a servant Anne Woodnot. This may =
have been the land in present day Charles County on the Wiccomico River w=
here he set up a boatyard and established himself as a knowledgeable boat=
builder.
During his early years in Maryland, Smoot built boats for Ralph Beane an=
d Charles Calvert, among others. He purchased a ship from Governor Leona=
rd Calvert, trading it away within the year. In his old age he was asked=
to appraise the ship St. George, after it sank in the Wiccommico River. =
He may have grown tobacco on his plantations, but water craft appear to =
have been his main interest.
William Smoot is believed to have married and had children while still i=
n England. His conjectured English wife is not known and the children of=
their marriage are believed to be:
Richard; married Elizabeth
Thomas; married Jane Batten
Elizabeth; married Humphrey Atwickes
Anne; wed William Hungerford and William Barton =

Alice
William; married Jane
=0D
Most of the children are believed to have been born in England, but nothi=
ng definite is known. =

At the time of his move to Maryland, William Smoot apparently was marrie=
d to the widow Grace Wood, though there is confusion as to just who she w=
as. Newman, in The Smoots of Maryland and Virginia, noted Grace apparent=
ly was married to James Atwickes at the time of her transportation into V=
irginia by John Dorman of Northampton County. He received land for bring=
ing the Atwickes over in 1655, along with transporting their two children=
William and Jeane (note there is no daughter Elizabeth mentioned). Grac=
e was also thought to have married a Thomas Hinton and the Smoot children=
referred to her as "sister", causing one historian to think she may have=
been William Smoot's sister, rather than his wife. Whatever, she was at=
tached somehow to William Smoot in Maryland, and she died there January 1=
4, 1666.
The Smoots were Anglicans and signed Stone's Declaration allowing for fr=
eedom of religious worship in Maryland. Smoot continued to transport peo=
ple and acquire land throughout the 1650's. He is believed to have died =
within a few years of Grace and no will has been found.
=0D
William and Jane Smoot
Thomas and Dorothy Smoot Durham
=0D
It is not clear if William Smoot the younger was born in Maryland or Vir=
ginia. He is believed to have been born before 1654, but an exact date h=
as never been determined. Since William Smoot the elder did not receive =
any land for transporting him into Maryland, he may have been born after =
the 1646 move. The IGI lists his birth date as about 1636, so perhaps he=
never went to Maryland with this family!
He was living in Old Rappahannock County, Virginia by 1672 when he witne=
ssed the sale of a cow, and therefore he must have been at least 18 years=
old. At some point he married a woman named Jane and in 1681 he purchas=
ed some land. Within a few years the couple settled in Richmond County.
It continues to be confusing. The IGI lists Jane and William as the par=
ents of Dorothy Smoot, born in 1663 in Richmond County, Virginia. Newman=
lists the couple in The Smoots of Maryland and Virginia, as being parent=
s of three girls born between 1693 and 1698, none of whom were named Doro=
thy. They were:
Mary (April 7,1693- May 8, 1750); married Thomas Durham, Jr.
Elizabeth (March 16, 1698)
Anne (March 16, 1698)
=0D
Mary was willed a landed estate in 1693 by Elizabeth Grady of Richmond C=
ounty, VA. William Smoot received all of Elizabeth's personal property a=
nd was named the executor. Perhaps Elizabeth was his sister? Her will, =
dated March 4, 1693, was not approved until November 4, 1702 according to=
Newman. The officials approving the will were Thomas Durham (undoubtedl=
y the husband of Dorothy) and Richard Draper.
Perhaps we're dealing with different William Smoots married to Janes. I=
n The Dodson Family of North Farnham Parish, authors Lucas and Williams l=
ist William and Jane Smoot as having three daughters:
Dorothy (1663-1716); married Thomas Durham Sr. about 1685
Alice (?-1701); wed John Chinn and John Stretchly
Thomazin; married Marshall
=0D
Since in his will, William is named as William Smoot Sr, we can suppose t=
hey had a son as well. Our ancestor Dorothy is known to have given birth=
in 1686, so I'm inclined to believe the IGI and the Dodson family book.
On the other hand, maybe Dorothy, Alice and Thomazin are SISTERS of Will=
iam Smoot Sr. and none of them are descended from William Smoot the Maryl=
and boat builder? =

The primary historical connection between William Smoot Sr. and Dorothy =
Smoot is the granting of land in 1700. On August 2, 1700, William Smoot =
Sr.:
for love and affection for Dorothy Durham, wife of Thomas Durha=
m, and her children, deeded sixty-two acres of land entailing it upon the=
ir eldest son Thomas Durham Jr., their second son, John Durham and their =
eldest daughter, Mary Durham; he provides if all of these children the sa=
id land was to descend to the fourth, fifth and sixth child of the said D=
orothy Durham and if all the aforementioned children of Dorothy Durham de=
ceased, said land to descend to Ann Fox, wife of William Fox, Gentleman, =
of Lancaster County.
=0D
Ann Fox was the daughter of Dorothy's sister Alice. If William was Dorot=
hy's brother, he might be assigning family property to his sister, nieces=
and nephews in the above deed.
Thomas Durham, tobacco planter, and Dorothy Smoot were married before 16=
86 at the North Farnham Parish church. They had three children known to h=
ave survived to adulthood:
Mary (June 15, 1686-January 1, 1715); Thomas Dodson Sr.
Thomas Jr. (June 27, 1690-December 3, 1734); Mary Smoot
John (November 23, 1698-September 23, 1722)
=

In 1707 William Smoot Sr. deeded to Thomas and Dorothy Durham, his wife,=
an additional 50 acres of land. Jane Smoot also deeded them 50 acres of=
land in 1707.
That same year William Smoot witnessed another deed assigning land to th=
e Durhams. There is no mention of a purchase price for the land "upon a =
branch of Farnham Creeke called and knowne by the name of the Buory Swamp=
" estimated at 50 acres. It was granted and conveyed to both Thomas and D=
orothy Durham his wife on April 26, 1707 by a widow, Mary M. Gilbert and =
recorded on May 15.
William Smoot's will was dated February 24, 1715; Jane survived him. In=
the will, he mentioned his wife Jane, his son-in-law Thomas Durham and t=
hree grandchildren: Margaret, Joseph and Sarah Durham. =

The Thomas Durham mentioned in the will was the son of Thomas and Doroth=
y Smoot Durham, since Thomas Durham Jr. married Mary Smoot about 1710. T=
hat the will did not mention Dorothy Durham and referred to Mary's childr=
en as grandchildren, would seem to indicate Dorothy was not William's chi=
ld (though HER child Thomas was his son-in-law!). This all seems to indi=
cate Mary Smoot and her twin sisters were really William and Jane Smoot's=
children and Dorothy, Alice and Thomazin were other relations, albeit cl=
ose ones!
William made provision for his wife to "devise the use of all lands and =
the plantation during life", then everything went to his son-in-law and t=
hree grandchildren. We don't know when Jane died.
(Only three of Thomas and Mary Smoot Durham's children are listed in Wil=
liam Smoot Sr.'s will. The youngest child, Sarah, eventually grew up to m=
arry William Hanks, older brother of Luke Hanks from whom we descend.)
Thomas Durham Sr. marked and sealed his will on August 4, 1711, though i=
t was not approved until June 1, 1715. He left his plantation and all hi=
s lands and tenements to his "dear and loving wife" Dorothy, with the pla=
ntation going to his son Thomas and daughter-in-law Mary at Dorothy's dea=
th. His only daughter Mary Durham Dodson received tobacco and her son Th=
omas Dodson was granted land if son John Durham never had an heirs (which=
he doesn't appear to have had). =

William Smoot, Thomas Durham Sr. and Dorothy Smoot Durham were all dead =
by 1716. The person we are really interested in was Thomas and Dorothy's=
daughter Mary Durham, because she married Thomas Dodson.
=0D
=

=0D
=

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