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Archiver > EXULANTEN > 1999-10 > 0939347523


From: Charles Wardell <>
Subject: [EXULANTEN-L] THE SALZBURGER EXPULSION LISTS
Date: Fri, 08 Oct 1999 03:52:03 +0200


FYI: The following was published in the newsletter Missing Links:
RootsWeb's Genealogy Journal, Vol. 4, No. 41, 6 October 1999. RootsWeb:
<http://www.rootsweb.com/>;

QUOTE
* * * * *

SALZBURG EXPULSION LISTS WILL BE A BIG HELP

Reviewed by Horst Reschke <>

[The author writes a regular column in HERITAGE QUEST magazine
<http://www.heritagequest.com/genealogy/magazine/>; on Germanic
subjects.]

THE SALZBURGER EXPULSION LISTS, edited by Lewis Bunker Rohrbach,
Picton Press, Rockport, Maine, October 1999.

Grief and pain are not modern inventions. Refugees, expellees,
victims of "ethnic cleansing," were not the exclusive domain of
a Kosovo. History is replete with examples of man's inhumanity
to man.

For a case in point we go back in time to an event that
occurred about two and a half centuries ago, in Salzburg,
Austria. In 1723, Roman Catholic Archbishop Leopold von Firmian
felt committed to rooting out Protestantism in his territory.
To accomplish this, he issued a proclamation promising to compel
all Protestants in Salzburg either to become Catholics or to
leave the territory. This turned some 30,000 Lutherans into
refugees.

Then, in order to sweep Salzburg clean of Protestant elements,
the Archbishop issued his notorious 1731 expulsion order,
mandating that all remaining Protestants, some 21,475 people,
leave at once. But for the Protestant princes in Germany, who
took pity on the refugees and granted them a refuge, they would
have been destitute. As it turned out in many, if not in all,
instances, the sturdy, hard-working, stalwart Salzburgers became
an asset to the sovereign who allowed them to stay and settle in
his state. The king of Prussia, for example, fared extremely
well with the Salzburg refugees, whom he granted asylum and land
in his eastern-most province of East Prussia.

The various lists in German which a genealogist had to look up
in order possibly to find an ancestor amounted to a giant
headache which probably doubled if he or she was not schooled
in the German language.

It should therefore come as joyous news to all people of
"Salzburger Protestants" genealogy, that a book has been
published, nay, is hot off the press this month, which will be
a better tool than all previous list compilations combined. In
fact, that is what the book THE SALZBURGER EXPULSION LISTS is,
a consolidation of all previously constructed lists of Salzburg
Protestants. The 685-page English-language tome is the more
useful because, in addition, it contains a 30-page "Family and
Individual Index."

The core of the book consists of the essence of four previously
compiled sources, namely the STAMMBUCH DER OSTPREUSSISCHEN
SALZBURGER (register of East Prussian Salzburgers), compiled in
1934, in East Prussia, by Hermann Gollub; ALPHABETISCHES
REGISTER DER PERSONENNAMEN IN DEN SALZBURGER EMIGRATIONSLISTEN
(alphabetical register of names in the Salzburg emigration
lists) compiled and published by Herbert Nolde, in 1972. A
second edition followed in 1980. Then Mr. Nolde's son, Manfred,
published the result of rearranging his father's effort and
expanding it, giving it the title DIE SALZBURGER EMIGRANTEN:
ALPHABETISCHES REGISTER AND QUELLENAUSZUG DER PERSONENNAMEN IN
DEN SALZBURGER EMIGRATIONSLISTEN (The Salzburg Emigrants:
alphabetical register and abstract of names in the Salzburg
Emigration Lists).

Also used as potent sources on the Salzburg Emigrants subject,
as featured in this new book were: Detailed Reports on the
Salzburger Emigrants Who Settled in America: 1733-1760, by J.M.
Bolzius and I.C. Gronau (Picton Press, Rockport, Maine 1968-
1995) and The Salzburger Saga: Religious Exiles and Other
Germans Along the Savannah, by George Fenwick Jones, (Picton
Press, Camden, Maine, 1983 and 1997).

The publisher Picton Press should be congratulated for tackling
this monumental project and producing it in a timely manner, as
well as with an attractive cover.

One clarifying aspect bears mentioning if you should not find
your Salzburger surname spelled in exactly the way in which
your family uses it. Hermann Gollub, in his extensive foreword
to his lists compilation, points out that, prior to 1875,
"there was no fixed official spelling of surnames." The exotic
sound of the Salzburg dialect, which anyone who has ever heard
it, can confirm, would have driven a Prussian list-maker or
note-taker or in whatever official capacity he may have
functioned, to distraction. Thus, variations will have occurred.
Some are noted in the book, but it stands to reason that not
all of them could be accommodated.

END OF QUOTE

Best wishes,
--
Charles Wardell
A-2073 Schrattenthal 3
Tel/Fax: +43(2946)8325 Mobile: +43(676)359-1728
mailto: (COMPUSERVE: wardell)
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