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From: Brenda Gaines <>
Subject: [GAINES] GOWEN/ GOING FAMILY
Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 00:21:23 -0800


from ancestry.com PaulaBrannon68added this on 27 Nov 2009

Milhil/Michael Gowen Ancestry




GOWEN/ GOING FAMILY

Members of the Gowen family in Virginia were

1 i. Michael1, born say 1635.

ii. Philip1, born say 1650, called "Phillip Cowen a Negro" when he
petitioned the Governor and Council of State for his freedom. He was
the servant of Amye Beazleye whose 9 April 1664 will stated that he
was to be free and receive three barrels of corn and a suit of
clothes after serving her cousin, Humphrey Stafford, for eight years.
Stafford sold the remaining years of his indenture to Charles Lucas
who forced Philip to acknowledge an indenture for twenty years before
the Warwick County court [Colonial Papers, Library of Virginia
microfilm, p.19, fol. 2]. On 16 June 1675 he was called "Philip Gowen
negro Serving Mr. Jno Lucas" when the court ordered that his
indenture in Warwick County was invalid, that Philip was free, and
that he should be paid three barrels of corn according to Mrs. Amye
Beazleye's will [McIlwaine, Minutes of the Council, 411]. He may have
been identical to Philip Gawen who was listed in the quit rent roll
for James City County with 50 acres in 1704 [VMHB XXI:220].


1. Michael1 Gowen, born say 1635, was the "negro" servant of
Christopher Stafford who gave him his freedom by his 18 January 1654
York County will after four years of service. Accordingly, Stafford's
sister, Anne Barnehouse, discharged "Mihill Gowen" from her service
on 25 October 1657, and she gave him his child William, born of her
"negro Prossa" [DWO 3:16]. Since nothing further is said of Prossa,
she probably remained a slave. If she and Michael had any more
children, they too would have been slaves. Perhaps Michael married a
free woman - most likely white since most branches of the family were
very light skinned. Also, there may not have been any eligible free
African American women in York County at that time.

He patented "30 or 40 acres" in Merchants Hundred Parish in James
City County on 8 February 1668 and died before 11 September 1717 when
this land was mentioned again in James City County records:

It appears that Mihil Goen late of the said County of Jas. City dyed
seized of 30 or 40 acres [Duvall, James City County, 42, 78].

His children were

2 i. William1, born 25 August 1655.

3 ii. ?Daniel1, born say 1657.

4 iii. ?Christopher1, born say 1658.

5 iv. ?Thomas1, born say 1660.


2. William1 Gowen (Michael1), born 25 August 1655, son of Prossa,
was baptized by Mr. Edward Johnson on 25 September 1655 [York County
DWO 3:16]. He received a grant for land in Charles City County on 20
April 1687 [Patents 7:58]. He may have been the father of

6 i. Edward1, born say 1681.


3. Daniel1 Gowen (Michael1), born say 1657, received a patent for
100 acres in Kingston Parish, Gloucester County, adjoining his own
land on 1 May 1679 and another 52 acres in Gloucester County
adjoining Henry Preston, Ambrose Dudley, and Captain Ranson on 26
April 1698 [Patents 6:679; 9:147]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. James3, born say 1728, taxable in Gloucester County in 1770.
Perhaps his widow was Mary Gowen, taxable on 120 acres in 1784. He
and his unnamed wife were the parents of Sarah Gowen, born 16 January
1759 [Mason, Records of Colonial Gloucester, 33, 95].


4. Christopher1 Gowen (Michael1), born say 1658, may have been
named for Christopher Stafford, Michael1 Gowen's master. Christopher
and his wife Anne Gowen were living in Abingdon Parish, Gloucester
County, in January 1679 when their son Michael was born [Wynn,
Abingdon Parish, Gloucester County, Register, 319]. Their children were

7 i. Michael2, born in January 1679.

8 ii. ?Philip2, born say 1685.

iii. ?Christopher2, purchased 150 acres on the north side of the
Roanoke River in Bertie County, North Carolina, on 25 March 1728 [DB
C:23].


5. Thomas1 Gowen (Michael1), born say 1660, was living in
Westmoreland County between 1693 and 1702 when he was involved in
several minor court cases, both as defendant and plaintiff, for
debts. In 1703 he provided security of 2,000 pounds of tobacco for
Chapman Dark that he would return to the county after travelling to
Maryland to get testimony that he was a free man. On 1 March 1704/5
the court ordered him to pay Edward Barrow 1,200 pounds of tobacco
which Thomas lost to him in a horse race [Orders 1690-98, 90, 244a,
250a; 1698-1705, 33, 39a, 56a, 109, 174, 190a, 190, 238a, 254a]. He
was called Thomas Goin of Westmoreland County on 8 June 1707 when he
was granted 653 acres in Stafford County below the falls of the
Potomac River. This land was adjoining Robert Alexander's land
according to a 29 May 1739 Prince William County deed [Gray, Virginia
Northern Neck Land Grants, 39, 125]. In an 8 May 1767 land dispute a
seventy-year-old deponent, Charles Griffith, related a conversation
which he had with Major Robert Alexander forty-three years previously
in 1724. Major Robert Alexander, who owned land adjoining the Gowens,
supposedly said of them,

he had a great mind to turn the Molatto rascals (who were then his
tenants) of[f] his land.

Griffith further stated that

he was at a Race in the same year where the Goings were (who then had
running horses) and that the old people were talking about the Goings
taking up Alexanders land and selling it to Thomas and Todd which
land the old people then said was in Alexanders back line or at least
the greatest part of it ... and if it were not for the Alexanders
land ... the Goings would not be so lavish of their money of which
they seemed to have plenty at that time ... [Sparacio, Land Records
of Long Standing, Fairfax County, 89].

"Thomas and Todd," mentioned in the abstract, owned 1,215 acres in
Stafford County on Four Mile Creek adjoining Robert Alexander on 3
August 1719 which was land formerly surveyed for Thomas, John,
William, and James Goins [Gray, Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants,
69]. Later in his testimony Griffith mentioned conversations with
Thomas and James Gowen. Thomas' children may have been

9 i. William2, born say 1680.

10 ii. James1, born say 1683.

iii. Peter Goeing, born say 1690, granted 187 acres in King George
and Stafford counties adjoining Alexander Clements and Shrines' land
on 7 October 1724, but the deed was canceled and the land granted to
John Mercer [Northern Neck Grants A:86].


6. Edward1 Gowen (William1, Michael1), born say 1681, was taxable
on 150 acres in Kingston Parish, Gloucester County, in 1704 [Smith,
Quit Rents of Virginia, 1704, 37]. He may have been the father of

11 i. Edward2, born say 1700.


7. Michael2 Gowen (Christopher1, Michael1) was born in January
1679 in Abingdon Parish, Gloucester County [Wynn, Abingdon Parish,
Gloucester County, Register, 319] and was living in New Kent County
on 4 July 1702 [Bockstruck, Virginia's Colonial Soldiers, 218]. He
was probably living near the New Kent - Hanover County line on 14
July 1720 when the New Kent County court ordered the vestry of St.
Paul's Parish, Hanover County, to take "Michl Gowing's Male
Tithables" [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book of St. Paul's Parish, 93]. His
children may have been

i. John2, born say 1705, purchased 170 acres including a plantation
in St. Martin's Parish, Hanover County, from Shirley Whatley on 7
June 1734 [Court Records 1733-8, 71-3]. Perhaps John Gowen was the
ancestor of Henry Going who was head of a Hanover County household of
8 persons in 1782 [VA:27].

12 ii. Mary1, born say 1708.

13 iii. Ann1, born say 1719.


8. Philip2 Gowen (Christopher1, Michael1), born say 1685, was
living in New Kent County on 4 July 1702 [Bockstruck, Virginia's
Colonial Soldiers, 218]. He may have been the

14 i. George1, born say 1715.

ii. William, born say 1720, sued for trespass in Goochland County in
July 1741. Job Thomas sued him in May 1742 but failed to prosecute.
He and his wife Anutoice brought an action of trespass upon the case
against William Harris which was dismissed in August 1752. On 20
January 1755 he purchased 50 acres on a branch of Licking Hole Creek
called the Plum Tree Branch in Goochland County from Thomas Starke
for 12 pounds, and on 18 July 1757 he sold this land (signing) to
Jeremiah Rach for 14 pounds [DB 6:440; 7:177]. In September 1755 the
sheriff attached a horse belonging to Henry Adkins for a 7 pounds, 10
shilling debt he owed William. William Harris sued him for trespass
in a case that was dismissed by agreement in August 1752. John
Pleasants, Sr., sued him for 15 pounds damages in December 1763
[Orders 1735-41, 580; 1741-4, 36; 1750-7, 155, 170, 189; 1761-5, 250,
417, 573].

iii. Edward, born say 1722, sued by Mary Sutton in Goochland County
in May 1745. She failed to prosecute and the case was dismissed in
July 1746. Samuel Jordan sued him for debt in February 1746/7, but he
also failed to prosecute [Orders 1747-9, 67, 176, 212].

15 iv. Agnes1, born say 1725.

16 v. David1, born say 1727.

vi. Philip3, born say 1740, married Judith Potter and had a daughter
named Molly who was born 4 March 1770, baptized 27 May [Jones, The
Douglas Register, 87]. He was head of an Amherst County household of
13 persons in 1783 [VA:48] and 12 in 1785 [VA:83]. He and his
descendants were counted as white in the 1810 Virginia census.

17 vii. Mary Anne, born say 1742.


9. William2 Gowen (Thomas1, Michael1) was probably born about
1680. He and Evan Thomas were granted 124 acres in Stafford County on
Jonathan's Creek of Occaquan River on 10 September 1713, and he was
granted 180 acres on the main run of Accotinck Creek on 28 February
1719 [Gray, Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 54, 70]. He sold the
land on Jonathan's Creek on 6 May 1724. His wife Katherine Gowing was
called a widow in a 6 March 1726 Stafford County deed by which she
purchased 112 acres in Overwharton Parish near Rattlesnake Branch of
Pope's Head Run from her son Ambrose, which Ambrose's father, William
Gowing, was granted by patent of 12 November 1725 [DB J:121, 353].
She was called Catherine Padderson (Patterson) in her 21 May 1739
Prince William County will which was proved 23 July 1739 by her son
John Going. She left slaves and land to her children Alexander and
Susanna Going [WB C:180-181]. Thomas Ford, a neighbor of William2
Gowen [Joyner, Virginia's Northern Neck Warrants, 156], was a witness
to the will. William and Katherine's children were

18 i. John1, born say 1702.

ii. Ambrose, born say 1704, who sold William2's land to his mother.

iii. Susanna, who received a slave by her mother's will.

19 iv. ?William3, born say 1710.

20 v. Alexander, born say 1712.


10. James1 Gowen (Thomas1, Michael1), born say 1683, sold 652
acres in Stafford County on Four Mile Run adjoining Thomas Pearson on
4 March 1730 [DB C:118]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Daniel2, born about 1730, a 5'4", twenty-seven-year-old planter
from Stafford County who was listed in the 13 July 1756 size roll of
Captain Thomas Cocke's Company of the Virginia Militia. He was called
a hatter in the July 1757 size roll of Captain Joshua Lewis' Seventh
Company of the Virginia Regiment [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the
South, 385, 449].

21 ii. Luke, born say 1740.

iii. Michael5, born say 1742, head of a Shenandoah County household
of 7 persons in 1785 [VA:105].

iv. Joseph4, born say 1750, taxable in Loudoun County from 1769 to
1776, listed as Samuel Canby's tithable from 1771 to 1776 [Tithables
1758-1799, 477a, 576, 636, 670, 731, 780, 806a], head of a Fairfax
County household of 7 persons in 1782 [VA:17]. His indenture to
Samuel Canby was proved in Loudoun County court on 2 October 1772
[Orders 1770-3, 433].

v. George2, born say 1750, "free Negro" head of a Fairfax County
household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:257].

vi. Jason1, born before 1762, taxable in Loudoun County in 1774 and
1779 [Tithables 1758-1799, 768, 898a]. He was called the "brother of
Luke Goins" on 23 December 1795 when they obtained certificates as
"free Negroes" in Loudoun County. The certificate stated that Jason
had been living in the neighborhood of John Littleton for upward of
twenty years [Certificates of Free Negroes at the Loudoun County
courthouse, transcribed by Townsend Lucas]. There was a court case in
Loudoun County on 14 November 1786 in which Jason's suit against
James Elliott abated by the death of the plaintiff [Orders 1785-6, 383].


11. Edward2 Goeing (Edward1, William1, Michael1), born say 1700,
was sued by Francis Tyree for a debt of 450 pounds of tobacco in
Charles City County in August 1737. He sold land by deed he
acknowledged in court in Charles City County in May 1746 [Orders
1737-51, 16, 409]. He may have been the father of

i. Phillis Goeing, born say 1720, presented by the grand jury in
Charles City in November 1739 for having a bastard child. She
petitioned the court in July 1745, apparently asking that her
children be bound to George Gibson, but the court ordered the
churchwardens to bind them out because Gibson failed to answer her
petition. On 7 August 1754 the churchwardens of Westover Parish sued
her for debt, probably for having an illegitimate child [Orders
1737-51, 105, 117, 371, 383; 1751-7, 112, 142, 251].

22 i. Michael3, born say 1722.

23 ii. James2, born say 1725.

24 iii. Edward3, born say 1727.

25 iv. Joseph1, born say 1730.

26 v. David2, born say 1735.

27 vii. Shadrack1, born say 1737.

viii. Suffiah, born say 1739, head of a Pittsylvania County household
of 12 persons in 1785 [VA:100].

28 ix. John7, born say 1740.

x. Moses3, born say 1743, testified in Henry County court on 27 April
1780 that he had served as a soldier in Captain James Gunn's Company
in Colonel Byrd's Regiment in 1760 (in the French and Indian War) but
had not received bounty land. On 28 March 1783 he owned land on both
sides of the North Mayo River when the Henry County court allowed him
to build a water grist mill on it [Orders 1778-82, 86; 1782-5, 75].
He was taxable in Henry County from 1782 to 1786, charged with 2
tithes in 1785 and 1786 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830,
frames 18, 38, 87, 152, 217].


12. Mary1 Going (Michael2, Christopher1, Michael1), born say 1708,
was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, in April 1740 when the
court ordered her children Drury and Eleanor bound to Ralph Jackson.
She may also have been the mother of Cave Gowen, a seven-year-old boy
who was bound to James Vaughan by the 6 June 1734 Brunswick County
court and Thomas and John Going who were bound out by the court in
May 1739, no parent named [Orders 1737-41, 254, 302]. Her children were

i. ?Cave, born about 1727.

ii. ?Thomas3, born say 1734, sued in Brunswick County, Virginia court
by James House on 27 November 1759. He sued Joseph King in Brunswick
County court on 23 January 1760 [Orders 1757-9, 426; 1760-84, 75].

29 iii. ?James4 Gowen, born say 1735.

iv. ?John4, born say 1736.

30 v. Drury1, born say 1738.

vi. Eleanor, born say 1740.

vii. ?Frederick1, born say 1745, living in New Hanover County, North
Carolina, in December 1767 when there was a warrant for his arrest
for contempt and aiding the escape from jail of Richard Burbage who
was held on suspicion of horse stealing [Minutes 1738-69, 331]. He
and his wife were taxable "Molatoes" in Bladen County in 1770 and
1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:34, 95].


13. Ann1 Going (Michael2, Christopher1, Michael1), born say 1719,
sued John Magoffe and his wife Jane in Brunswick County, Virginia, in
September 1740 [Orders 1737-41, 353, 379]. Ann was living in
Granville County, North Carolina, on 5 September 1753 when the court
ordered her "Mulatto" child Cooper bound to John Parnall [Owen,
Granville County Notes, vol. I]. She was in Cumberland County, North
Carolina, in November 1761 when the court ordered her to "keep in her
possession a Mulatto Boy which she now has in order that she may have
him here next court" [Minutes 1759-65, 75]. She may have been the Ann
Goin who was granted 100 acres on Broad River and both sides of
Fannin's Creek in what later became Union County, South Carolina
[Lucas, Some South Carolina County Records, 2:524]. On 3 April 1799
the Robeson County court ordered John Ford, Esquire, in South
Carolina to take her deposition on behalf of James Terry vs. Willis
Barfield [Minutes 1797-1803, 69]. Her children may have been

i. Cooper, born say 1752.

31 ii. John6, born say 1758.

iii. Olive, born say 1780, head of a Robeson County household of 2
"other free" in 1800 [NC:381] and 2 "free colored" in 1840 [NC:222].

iv. William9, born about 1787, eleven years old when he was ordered
by the 3 April 1798 Robeson County court bound apprentice to James
Alford [Minutes 1797-1803, 37]. He was head of a Robeson County
household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:232] and 6 "free colored" in
1840 (55-100 years old) [NC:222]. On 23 November 1841 the Robeson
County court granted him permission to carry his gun in the county
[Minutes 1839-43, 240].


14. George1 Gowen (Philip2, Christopher1, Michael1, John1), born
say 1715, and his wife Sarah Gowan were the parents of Aaron, born 9
June, baptized 3 September 1737 in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent
County [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 134]. He sued William
Chamberlayne for trespass in Goochland County in May 1748. Job
Pleasants sued him for debt in February 1748/9 and he sued William
Chamberlayne in August 1752 [Orders 1744-9, 436, 476, 506]. In July
1760 William Winston "Essex," who "as well in behalf of Us as for
himself" sued Sarah Going, perhaps for failing to list herself as a
tithable. He failed to prosecute and was ordered to pay her costs in
July 1761 [Orders 1757-61, 318, 429]. George was added to the list of
tithables in Goochland County in August 1761. Thomas Whitlock sued
him and Sarah Going in a case which was agreed between the parties in
July 1764. George and Sarah sued Thomas Whitlock for trespass,
assault and battery in February 1765, and Whitlock sued Sarah for
debt in the same court. To satisfy the debt, the court ordered the
sheriff to sell nine pigs belonging to Sarah in the hands of
garnishee William French [Orders 1761-5, 15, 404, 468, 470, 507-8].
They were the ancestors of

i. Aaron1, born 9 June, baptized 3 September 1737 in St. Peter's
Parish, New Kent County [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 134].
He sued John Winston for trespass assault and battery in Goochland
County in June 1760. Winston testified that he only touched the
plaintiff gently, but Aaron was awarded 5 shillings [Orders 1757-61,
303, 328-9, 353; 1761-5, 8, 104]. He was living in Louisa County on
19 May 1763 when he mortgaged his household goods to Thomas Underwood
of Hanover County for 36 pounds currency by deed proved in Goochland
County in September 1764 [DB 8:422; Orders 1750-57, 84; 1757-61, 429;
1761-65, 429]. He was taxable in Powhatan County in John Chitwood's
household in 1791, charged with his own tax in 1792, 1796 and 1797
[PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 58, 77, 132, 146].

ii. ?Moses2, born say 1742, sued in Goochland County by William
Hudnell in April 1763. Thomas Riddle posted his bail. The suit was
dismissed on agreement between the parties. He sued James Moseley in
April 1763 but the case was also dismissed on agreement. He sued
Charles Murler for a 16 pound, 12 shilling debt in August 1763; he
was sued by Robert Smith for 30 shillings in May 1764; he
acknowledged a debt of 14 pounds, 10 shillings to Messrs. William
Pryor and William Merriwether in June 1764 and acknowledged a debt of
15 pounds, 12 shillings to Adams and Thomas Underwood in September
1764 [Orders 1761-5, 145, 151, 158, 228-9, 327, 334, 369, 424]. He
was a taxable in Powhatan County from 1792 to 1797 and from 1801 to
1817: called a "Mo" from 1793 to 1795 and from 1801 to 1814; listed
with 1 "free negroes & mulattoes" above the age of 16 in his
household in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 77,
92, 106, 118, 132, 146, 223, 257, 278, 295, 317, 342, 363, 380, 399,
421, 438, 458, 482, 533].

iii. ?Shadrack2, taxable in Powhatan County from 1791 to 1797: his
tax charged to Judith Bingley in 1791, called a "Mo" from 1793 to
1795 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 57, 92, 106, 118,
132, 146].


15. Agnes1 Going (Philip2, Christopher1, Michael1), born say 1725,
was living in Louisa County on 10 October 1743 when she sued Gilbert
Gibson for 3 pounds currency for services done on a contract. On 9
January 1743/4 the court ordered that she receive twenty-five lashes
on her bare back for having an illegitimate child. She bound her son
Joseph and daughter Sarah Going to James Bunch by 28 November 1759
Fredericksville Parish indenture [Davis, Fredericksville Parish
Vestry Book, 29]. On 9 September 1766 she made a deposition in George
Gibson's suit against his step-mother Sarah Gibson. On 14 May 1770
the court ordered the churchwardens of Trinity Parish to bind out all
her children under twenty-one years except the youngest. On 12
February 1776 she complained to the court about the treatment her son
Sherod was receiving from his master William Phillips [Orders 1742-8,
82, 91, 92, 95; 1766-74, 20; 1766-72, 379; 1774-82, 140, 142]. She
was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1787 to
1794: taxable on a free male tithe in 1787 and 1788; taxable on a
horse from 1791 to 1794 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799,
frames 116, 153, 203, 347, 419]. She was the mother of

i. ?Moses1, born say 1742, possibly the unnamed child born to Agnes
Gowen in Louisa County before January 1743. He was called "Moses
Going, mulatto" in his February 1761 to March 1762 account with
Archibald Ingram, George Kipper, & Co. of Albemarle County [Weisiger,
Albemarle County Court Papers, 23]. He was a taxable in the Trinity
Parish, Louisa County household of John Fox in 1770 and in his own
household in 1772 [Davis, Louisa County Tithables, 25, 34]. He was
required to post a bond of 50 pounds and his security George Gibson
posted 25 pounds on 10 July 1775 when Joseph Cooper swore the peace
against him in Louisa County court [Orders 1774-82, 126-7]. He
purchased 353 acres in Louisa County from Michael Ailstock on 13
January 1777, and he and his wife Agnes sold this land six months
later on 9 June 1777 [DB E:14, 156]. On 14 July 1777 he, Joshua Going
and Charles Sprouse, Sr., were charged by the Louisa County court
with hog stealing, but the sheriff was unable to arrest them because
they were in hiding. The court ordered the sheriff to summon a posse
to arrest them [Orders 1774-82, 171]. He was taxable in Louisa County
on a horse in 1783 and 1785 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1814].

32 ii. Joseph3, born about 1747.

iii. Sarah, born about 1751, eight years old when she was bound to
James Bunch as an apprentice planter on 28 November 1759 [Davis,
Fredericksville Parish Vestry Book, 29]. Her suit against Gideon and
Jordan Gibson for trespass, assault and battery was dismissed by the
Louisa County court by consent of the parties on 11 April 1774. She
was the mother of Amey Going who was bound apprentice by the
churchwardens of Trinity Parish, Louisa County, on 9 January 1775
[Orders 1774-82, 10, 42, 113]. She registered as a "Free Negro" in
Campbell County on 12 May 1802: 5 feet 8 Inches, 45 years old,
Malattoe, born free in Louisa County. Her daughter Amey, born about
1768, registered in Campbell County on 20 January 1802: 5'2-3/4", 34
years old, yellow complection, born free [A Register of Free Negroes
and Mulattoes, 1, 3].

iv. ?David2, born say 1751, taxable in Fredericksville Parish in his
own household in 1772, taxable in Moses Going's household in 1775,
taxable in the Trinity Parish household of Pouncy Bunch in 1774 and
taxable in Joseph Bunch's household in 1778 [Davis, Louisa County
Tithables, 133, 45, 73]. His suit against Robert Anderson for
trespass, assault and battery was dismissed by the Louisa County
court on 13 July 1773 at Anderson's costs [Orders 1766-74]. He was
taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1782 to
1809, called a "Mulatto" in 1812; called "David Going Senr. Mula" in
1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1799, frames 12, 29, 44, 76,
116, 153, 202, 252, 300, 386, 419, 459, 481, 516, 555, 591;
1800-1813, frames 161, 207, 250, 297, 344, 388, 434, 478, 522, 566]
and head of an Albemarle County household of 8 "other free" in 1810
[VA:195].

33 v. ?Benjamin1, born say 1753.

34 vi. ?Joshua, born say 1755.

vii. ?Elizabeth, born say 1760, sued James Usher in Albemarle County
court for failing to pay for a gown, an apron, a quilted petticoat,
and three linen handkerchiefs. Hannah Witheral was her witness. The
court awarded her 2 pounds currency on 7 December 1786 [Orders
1795-8, 229-30]. On 14 May 1793 the Louisa County court ordered the
overseers of the poor to bind out her illegitmate daugthter Agnes
Going to Mary Hancock [Orders 1790-3, 522].

35 viii. Sherrod1, born say 1762.

ix. ?Archibald, born say 1763, taxable on 2 horses and 5 cattle in
Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1784 [Personal Property
Tax List, 1782-1799, frame 44].

x. ?Milly, born say 1763, of Louisa County, married Charles Croucher,
22 June 1785 in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County. He was head
of a Albemarle County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:153].

xi. ?Usly, born say 1765, married Jonathan Tyre, 21 October 1786
Albemarle County bond, Shadrack Battles bondsman.


16. David1 Going (Philip2, Christopher1, Michael1), born say 1727,
was indicted by the Henrico County court on 6 November 1752 for not
going to church and for failing to list his "Mulatto" wife as a
tithable. He paid a 5 shilling fine for not going to church but
pleaded not guilty to the other charge. He failed to appear when the
case came to trial in April 1753 and was fined 1,000 pounds of
tobacco [Minutes 1752-5, 19, 26, 27, 52]. He may have been the David
Going who sued Richard Farris for trespass, assault and battery in
Goochland County but discontinued the suit on 21 May 1754 [Orders
1750-7, 387]. He purchased 400 acres adjoining William Harlow's land
in Henrico County from Michael Gawin (Gowen) of Bute County, North
Carolina, on 20 March 1765 with John Gawin as witness [Miscellaneous
Court Records 6:1943-4]. He and his wife Elizabeth sold 100 acres of
this land in the fork of Farrar's Branch adjoining John Harlow,
Nathan Dunaway and his own land to David Barnett on 25 October 1770
[Deeds 1767-74, 260]. He was taxable in the upper district of Henrico
County from 1784 to 1790: taxable on a horse and 7 cattle in 1785,
exempt from tax on his person in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 57, 73,
124, 143, 195, 217; Orders 1784-7, 568]. He was taxable on 100 acres
on the headwaters of Chickahominy Swamp in the upper district of
Henrico County from 1799 to 1805 [Land Tax List 1799-1816]. He left a
17 March 1803 Henrico County will which was proved on 8 March 1805.
He left all to his grandson David Going, reserving to Agatha Going
peaceful possession where she was then living during her lifetime. He
also named grandson John Harlace 4 pounds, left Meredith Childress a
bed and furniture, and named his grandson David Going and Meredith
Childress his executors. His estate was valued at 55 pounds [WB
3:183-4]. He was probably the father of

36 i. Agnes2, born say 1748


17. Mary Anne Gowen (Philip2, Christopher1, Michael1), born say
1742, was bound out by the churchwardens of Southam Parish, Goochland
County, to David Thomas in January 1747/8 [Orders 1744-9]. On 25 May
1761 the Cumberland County court ordered the churchwardens of King
William Parish to bind out her son Stephen Goen to Peter Anthony
Luckado [Orders 1758-62, 322], and on 16 May 1782 the Powhatan County
court ordered the churchwardens of King William Parish to bind out
her son Moses Going to Francis Merryman [Orders 1777-84, 225]. She
was the mother of

i. Stephen1, born say 1760.

ii. Moses6, born say 1775, taxable in Powhatan County from 1792 to
1797 and from 1801 to 1817: called a "Mo" from 1793 to 1795 and from
1801 to 1814; listed with 1 "free negroes & mulattoes" above the age
of 16 in his household in 1813 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 77, 92, 106,
118, 132, 146, 223, 257, 278, 295, 317, 342, 363, 380, 399, 421, 438,
458, 482, 533].

iii. ?Shadrack3, taxable in Powhatan County from 1791 to 1797: his
tax charged to Judith Bingley in 1791, called a "Mo" from 1793 to
1795 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 57, 92, 106, 118, 132, 146].

iv. Alexander, son of Mary Going, ordered bound out by the
churchwardens of King William Parish in Powhatan County on 16 April
1784 [Orders 1777-84, 383].

v. Neptune, son of Mary Ann Going, ordered bound out (with his
brother Moses) by the churchwardens of King William Parish in
Powhatan County on 20 May 1784 [Orders 1777-84, 386].


18. John1 Gowen (William2, Thomas1, Michael1), born say 1702, and
wife Mary sold land, "...part of a tract granted William Gowen,
deceased, father to said Gowen..." on Pope's Head Run in Fairfax
County on 5 March 1744. John's wife Mary, probably a white woman, was
identified as the daughter of Cornelius Keife in a 9 June 1746
Fairfax deed by which he and his wife sold 112 acres on Occoquan Run
which had belonged to her father [DB A-1:551; A-2:349]. John and his
wife Mary moved to Lunenburg County where he was taxable on two
tithables in the list of Lewis Deloney in 1748 [Tax List 1748-52]. He
may have been the John Going who was tithable in Granville County in
the list of Jonathan White circa 1748 [CR 44.701.19]. On 14 February
1761 he patented 400 acres in Lunenburg County on Reedy Branch
[Patents 34:809]. He and wife Mary made a deed of gift of 100 acres
of this patent to two of their sons, William and John, on 10 June
1761 [DB 6:378-9]. Their children were

37 i. William4, born say 1725.

ii. John3, born say 1730, who sold the 100 acres of land his father
gave him while a resident of Lunenburg County on 1 December 1761 [DB
7:151]. He was probably the John Going who was living in Orange
County, North Carolina, in May 1764 when he was a defendant in a
court case [Haun, Orange County Court Minutes, 185, 383]. It was
reported that Colonel John Hogan of Orange County said he knew him
well in 1765 and that he was: a trifling, contemptible fellow, a
gambler, and a mulatto ... was then insolvent and probably is so
still if alive [NCGSJ IV:157 (Claims of British Merchants after the
Revolutionary War)]. He may have been the John Gowen who was granted
100 acres on Tiger River in South Carolina on 19 August 1774 [DB
32:205].

38 iii. ?Thomas2, born say 1732.


19. William3 Gowen (William2, Thomas1, Michael1), born say 1710,
was a planter in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 4 June 1747 when he
was fined and had to post security for his good behavior, "having
behaved himself in a very disorderly indecent and contemptuous manner
to this court" [Orders 1743-49, 204]. He purchased 910 acres on
Grassy Creek in Granville County, North Carolina, near the border
with Lunenburg County, Virginia, on 5 March 1751 [DB A:343]. He and
his family were counted as white taxables in the early Granville Tax
lists. He was taxed on two tithes in the 1751 Granville County list
of Samuel Henderson. He was in the 8 October 1754 muster of Captain
John Sallis' Company in the Granville County Regiment of Colonel
William Eaton [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 722]. He was
fined for trespass in the Granville County court on 3 December 1754,
5 March 1755, 1 March 1757, and again on 6 September 1757 [Minutes
1754-70, 11, 43, 46]. In the 1755 Summary Tax List he was taxable on
two white tithes for himself and son Joseph [CR 44.701.19]. In 1758
he was taxable on two white polls for himself and son William in the
list of James Yancey. On 2 December 1760 he patented two tracts of
land in St. John's Parish, Granville County, near the head of Dogwood
Branch, one for 650 acres and the other for 667 acres. In 1761 he was
taxed on two tithes for himself and James Gowen in Country Line
District in the list of Larkin Thompson. He sold 640 acres of his
land in Granville on 4 October 1762, made a deed of gift of 350 acres
to his son Joseph on 7 August 1765, and the sheriff sold 350 acres of
his land for debt on 5 February 1767 [DB E:440-448; F:382; H:28,
226]. He may have been the William Gowen, Sr., who was granted 396
acres on Sink Hole Fork of Middle Tiger River in South Carolina
[Pruitt, Spartanburg County Deed Abstracts (DB A:109)]. His children
who were taxable in North Carolina were

i. Joseph2, born circa 1740, taxable in his father's household in the
1757 Granville County list of Richard Harris. He received a deed of
gift of land in Granville County from his father on 7 August 1765 [DB
H:28]. He was taxed in Granville County for the last time in 1767
when he had 3 "white" males in his household in the list of Philips
Pryor: Presley Harrison, John Cunningham, and Minor Cockram. By 1771
he was in South Carolina where he received a grant for land in the
northwest part called the Tiger River tract [DB 23:539].

ii. William5, born circa 1742, taxable in Granville County in 1758.
He may have been the William Gowen, Jr., who was granted 116 acres on
Mill Creek in South Carolina [Owens, Patent Land Survey, 15].

iii. James5, born circa 1745 since he was taxable in 1761 in his
father's Country Line District household.


20. Alexander Gowen, born say 1712, may have been named for the
Gowens' neighbor in Stafford County, Major Robert Alexander. He
received 66 acres by his mother's will, and sold it on 14 August 1747
[Fairfax DB B:253]. He was in North Carolina by 15 July 1760 when he
received a patent for 600 acres in Orange County in St. Matthew's
Parish on both sides of Hogan's Creek [Hoffman, Granville District
Land Grants, 273]. He may have been the Alexander Gowing who was sued
for a 3 pounds, 15 shilling debt by Thomas Dudley in July 1773 and
sued Zachariah Waller for 2 pounds, 2 shillings on 24 September 1773
in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. He died before 23 September 1779
when William Armstrong's case against him was dismissed by the
defendant's death [Orders 1772-5, 236, 253-4; 1777-83, 273]. His wife
was apparently Sophia Going, Senior, who purchased for 30 pounds 400
acres "on the country line" in Pittsylvania County from Daniel Going
of South Carolina on 4 September 1781 [DB 7:546]. She was called Seth
Gowing when the deed was proved in court on 19 December 1785. Sethe
or Lethe was head of a Pittsylvania County household of 11 free
persons in 1782 [VA:41] and called Suffiah Going when she was head of
a household of 12 free persons [VA:100. Sophia was called the
administrator of the estate of Alexander Going, deceased, when she
was sued by Sophia Going, Junior, on 20 March 1798 on testimony of
James Saunders of Caswell County, North Carolina. Sophia, Sr., was
apparently living on land claimed by George Clopton on 21 May 1798
when he sued Sophia, John, Jesse and Sherwood Going as tenants
[Orders 1783-7, 354; 1795-8, 461, 479, 486; 1798-1801, 23, 59].
Sophia, Jr., perhaps suing for her part of her father's estate, was
awarded 20 pounds, 5 shillings by a jury on 21 November 1799.
Sherwood Going became a defendant in the suit when Sophia, Sr.,
failed to meet the payment of a bond [Orders 1798-1801, 109, 180,
204, 233]. In the tax lists she was called Sethey in 1782, Suffiah in
1785 and thereafter: listed with 8 slaves, 5 horses and 16 cattle in
1782; 6 slaves, 4 horses, and 9 cattle in 1784; 8 slaves, 3 horses
and 10 cattle in 1785; taxable on 6 free males, a slave and 3 horses
in 1788; on 2 slaves and 3 horses in 1790; on J. Rodgers' tithe, a
slave and 4 horses in 1792; taxable on Sherwood Going's tithe in
1793; a slave and 4 horses in 1794 [PPTL 1782-97, frames 192, 211,
217, 236, 343, 428, 476, 538, 598, 623]. She recorded a bill of sale
to Sherwood Going in Pittsylvania County court on 16 June 1800
[Orders 1798-1801, 295]. Alexander and Sophia were the parents of
children who were all considered white in the 1813 Pittsylvania
county tax list:

i. ?John, taxable in Pittsylvania County in 1782 to 1797 [PPTL
1782-97, frames 192, 694, 717, 768].

ii. ?Jesse, taxable in Pittsylvania County from 1782 to 1796 [PPTL
1782-97, frames 192, 217, 237, 257, 280, 694, 717].

iii. Sherwood, taxable in Pittsylvania County in 1790, from , listed
with his unnamed mother in 1793 and from 1795 to 1797 [PPTL
1782-1797, frames 236, 476, 515, 538, 598, 623, 694, 717, 768].

iv. Sophia, Jr., mother of illegitimate child Benjamin Going bound
out by the Pittsylvania County court on 20 November 1798 [Orders
1798-1801, 58]. Lythe Gowing married William Carter 27 January 1792
Pittsylvania County bond.


21. Luke1 Gowen (James1, Thomas1, Michael1), born say 1740, was
taxable in James Hamilton's list for Loudoun County in 1767 with
Joseph Hough; taxable in 1768 with William Allin in his household;
taxable on his own tithe and Samuel Johnson in 1769; taxable on his
own and Joseph Proctor's tithe in 1774; taxable in Cameron Parish on
his own tithe and Leonard Goin in 1778; taxable on John McQueen's
tithe in 1781; Thomas Hopkins' tithe, 2 horses and 2 cattle in 1782.
He was taxable on Moses Gowen's tithe in 1787, 1788, 1790, and 1792;
taxable on Peyton Gowen's tithe in 1797; called a blacksmith in 1812
[Tithables 1758-1799, 395, 409, 477, 492, 768, 832, 861, 1022, 1320;
PPTL 1782-7; 1787-97; 1797-1812]. On 17 October 1783 he acknowledged
in Loudoun County court a debt of 45 pounds to John Hough with
interest from 11 April 1769, with allowance for a payment of 1 pound,
13 shillings made on 11 October 1770. On 17 June 1784 the court
ordered that his tithables, inlcuding himself, 2 horses and 2 cattle,
be added to the list of Thomas Respass [Orders 1783-5, 170, 351]. He
was head of a Loudoun County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:
288]. He and his wife Margaret were certified to be "free Negroes" in
Loudoun County on 23 December 1795. The certificate stated that they
had been living in the neighborhood of John Littleton for above
thirty years [Certificates of Free Negroes at the Loudoun County
courthouse, transcribed by Townsend Lucas]. He may have been the
father of

i. Leonard, born say 1762, taxable in Luke Goin's Loudoun County
household in 1774, taxable on his own tithe in 1780 [Tithables
1758-1799, 993]. He was the father of Elihu Goins who was born 15
April 1788. Elihu married Susannah, the daughter of Anthony Lucas.
Susannah was born 25 April 1785 [Certificates of Free Negroes at the
Loudoun County courthouse, transcribed by Townsend Lucas]. He sued
Luke Going in Loudoun County court on 16 February 1791 but the case
was agreed before coming to trial [Orders 1790-1, 102]. He was
taxable in Loudoun County from 1787 to 1813: taxable on 4 tithes in
1813 (his wife and two children?) [PPTL 1787-97].

ii. Lucretia, taxable on a horse in Loudoun County in 1793 [PPTL
1787-97].

iii. Moses5, born say 1770, taxable in Loudoun County from 1787 to
1791 and in 1801 [PPTL 1787-97; 1797-1812].

iv. Jason2, not yet twenty-one when he was taxable in Loudoun County
in 1787, taxable in 1791 and 1797 [PPTL 1787-97].

v. Luke2, Jr., taxable in Loudoun County from 1795 to 1805, listed in
Luke Gowen, Sr.'s household in 1795 and 1803 [PPTL 1787-97; 1797-1812].

vi. Peyton, taxable in Loudoun County from 1795 to 1813: taxable in
Luke Gowen's household in 1795 and 1797, taxable in Walter Elgon's
household in 1796, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1809 and 1811, listed with
his unnamed wife in 1813 [PPTL 1787-97; 1797-1812].

vii. Zachariah, born about 1775, sixteen and a half years old on 12
April 1791 when the Loudoun County court bound him to John Keough to
be a blacksmith [Orders 1790-1, 158], taxable in Loudoun County from
1797 to 1809: a "Mulatto" taxable in 1805, 1806 and 1809 [PPTL
1787-97; 1797-1812].

viii. Joseph5, head of a Loudoun County household of 4 "other free"
and 1 white woman in 1810 [VA:292].

ix. William, taxable in Luke Gowen's household in 1799 and 1803, a
"Mul" taxable in 1811 [PPTL 1797-1812].


22. Michael3 Gowen (Edward2, Edward1, William1, Michael1), born
say 1722, was sued for debt in Henrico County in June 1744 [Orders
1737-46, 267]. He was called Micahael Gawin when he was granted 400
acres in Henrico County on 30 June 1743 adjoining William Harlow.
Land adjoining Michael Going, Farrar's Branch and Orphant's line was
patented in Henrico County on 15 September 1752 [Patents 21:424;
31:193]. He was living in Bute County, North Carolina, on 20 March
1765 when he sold this land to David Gawin [Miscellaneous Court
Records 6:1943-4]. He was taxable in John MacKisick's household in
the 1750 Granville County, North Carolina tax list of Edward Jones
[CR 44.701.23]. On 3 May 1752 he purchased 225 acres on both sides of
Taylors Creek in Granville County [DB B:73]. He was taxed as a
"Black" tithe in 1753 in the list of Osborn Jeffreys, as a "white"
tithe in Jeffreys' 1754 list, and as a "black" tithe in the 1755 tax
summary. He was in the 8 October 1754 Muster Roll of the Granville
County Regiment of Colonel William Eaton, Captain Osborne Jeffrey's
Company:

Thomas Gowen Mulatto

Mickael Gowen Mulatto

Edward Gowen Mulatto [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 718].

He was taxed in 1759 in the list of John Pope with John Wilson, both
called "Mulattoe," and he was taxed in Pope's 1761 list with the
notation, "Refuses to list his wife," probably claiming that he was
white. He may have been identical to Michael Going whose estate was
attached in Culpeper County on 18 August 1763 by Artomenas Robertson
for 3 pounds, 3 shillings [Minutes 1763-4, 407, 441]. He was taxed in
the Bute County List of Philemon Hawkins in 1771:

Michle Gowine & Wife & Sons Michile & David Doughter Elizebeath Wm
Wilson 0 white/ 6 black/ 6 total [1771 List of Taxables, p.11].

He was in Prince George Parish, Craven County, South Carolina, on 3
June 1778 when he made a deed of gift of 80 acres on the south side
of Taylor's Creek on the border of Bute and Granville Counties to
Jenkins Gowen, no relationship stated. Jenkins (his nephew?) was to
take title to the land at the death of Michael's brother Edward and
his wife who were given permission to live on the land [Granville
County WB 1:193]. His children were

i. Michael4, Jr., born say 1738, a defendant in a 3 September 1755
Granville County court case.

ii. Elizabeth, born before 1760 since she was taxable in Michael
Gowen's household in 1771.

iii. David4, born before 1760 since he was taxable in Michael Gowen's
household in 1771. He may have been the _avid Gowen who received
thirty nine lashes in Granville County for petty larceny in 1773
[Minutes 1773-83, 1].


23. James2 Gowen (Edward2, Edward1, William1, Michael1), born say
1725, was not mentioned in Granville County, North Carolina records
until 1756, so he may have been living in Virginia before then. He
received a patent for 529 acres in St. John's Parish, Granville
County on Wharton's Branch on 29 November 1756 [DB E:439]. He and his
son William, "Mulattoes," were taxable in the 1759 Granville County
list of John Pope and were delinquent taxpayers that year. In 1762 he
was taxable in Fishing Creek District with his son William, with the
notation "Refs. to list his wife," and he was an insolvent taxpayer
from 1762 to 1764. He was the father of

39 i. William6, born before 1748.


24. Edward3 Gowen (Edward2, Edward1, William1, Michael1), born say
1727, purchased 100 acres on the south side of Mill Creek in
Brunswick County, Virginia, on 2 June 1748 [DB 3:444]. He was sued in
Brunswick County court in September 1753 [Orders 1753-56, 65]. He was
taxable in 1753 in Osborn Jeffrey's Granville County tax list, and he
was a "Mulatto" listed in the 8 October 1754 muster roll of Captain
Osborne Jeffreys' Granville County Company [Clark, Colonial Soldiers
of the South, 718]. He was prosecuted in Edgecombe County by the
Attorney General for concealing his tithables in August 1756 [Haun,
Edgecombe County Court Minutes, I:131], but he still refused to list
his wife in the Granville County Tax List for 1765 [CR 44.601.20]. He
and his wife were two "Black" taxables in Bute County in the list of
Philemon Hawkins in 1771 [1771 List of Taxables, p.6]. On 3 June 1778
his brother Michael, while a resident of South Carolina, allowed him
to remain on 80 acres on Taylor's Creek [WB 1:193-4]. The sheriff
sold this land shortly afterwards on 3 August 1779 [DB M:179], and
Edward was taxed on 90 acres in nearby Ford Creek District, Granville
County, in 1782. He was probably related to Elizabeth Bass since he
made over all his interest in her estate to his nephew Thomas Gowen
on 14 October 1788 [WB 2:79]. He was head of a Granville County
household of 2 free males and 3 free females in the 1786 state census
and head of a Granville County household of 5 "other free" in 1810
[NC:905]. His children were

i. Edward4, born circa 1744 in Virginia, taxable in 1761 in his
father's household in the list of Robert Harris. In 1767 he was head
of his own household, one Black male, in John Pope's list. In 1779 he
was listed among the continental soldiers from Bute County who served
for nine months: Edward Going private, born Virginia, 5'7", 35 years
old Black Fair; black eyes [NCGSJ XV:109]. On 3 August 1779 he
entered 75 acres on the South Hyco Creek in Caswell County (called
Edward Gains) [Pruitt, Land Entries: Caswell County, 89] and in 1784
he was taxed on one poll and 100 acres on Hyco Creek in St. Luke's
District, Caswell County. This part of Caswell County became Person
County in 1791, and he was taxed on 245 acres and one poll in Person
County in 1793 [N.C. Genealogy XVII:2678, abstracted as Edward
Gains]. He was head of a Person County household of 6 "other free" in
1800 [NC:599]. He and Jenkins Goins sold their claims for
Revolutionary War pay to John Hall of Hyco, Caswell County, on 27
April 1791 [NCGSJ IX:224]. Perhaps he was the Edward Goins who was
the great grandfather of Daniel Goins, born about 1816, who made an
affidavit in Randolph County, North Carolina, in 1882 that he was the
son of William, grandson of William, and great grandson of Edward
Goins, who was "Slitly mixt about an eight" [Randolph County
Genealogical Society, The Genealogical Journal, Winter (1980): 21].

ii. Reeps, born circa 1749, taxable in his father's Granville County
household in the 1761 list of Robert Harris. He was called Rapes
Going when he enlisted in the Second South Carolina Regiment under
Captain Thomas Hall on 1 July 1779 [Moss, Roster of S.C. Patriots in
the American Revolution, 367].

iii. ?Jenkins, born about 1761, a seventeen-year-old "mullato" in
1778 when he enlisted in Captain John Rust's Company of Granville
County militia [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)]. He
received 30 acres by a Granville County deed of gift from Michael
Gowen (his uncle?) on 3 June 1778 [WB 1:193]. He was taxable in
Granville County in 1790.

iv. ?Jesse1, born say 1762, married Sealey Bairding, 9 June 1784
Caswell County bond, John Going bondsman.


Other members of the family in Person County were

i. Goodrich, born say 1764, purchased 175 acres on Cane Creek in
Caswell County on 1 November 1784 and sold it five years later on 4
January 1798 [DB C:3; F:163]. He was taxed on this 175 acres and one
poll in St. Lawrence District, Caswell County, in 1784. On 6
September 1791 he married Betsey Matthews, Caswell County bond with
Allen Going bondsman. He was head of a Person County household of 7
"other free" in 1800 [NC:612] and 5 in 1810 when his name was
interlined [NC:702]. Gutrige Goin was a "Mulatto" taxable in the
southern district of Halifax County, Virginia, taxable from 1802 to
1804, perhaps identical to Birbridge Goin, a "Mulatto" taxable there
in 1805 and 1806 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1800-12, frames 186,
317, 372, 517, 626] and called Berridge/ Burbage Goin in Patrick
County from 1809 to 1813: listed as a Mulatto" in 1812 and 1813
[Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames 515, 537, 553, 569,
598]. Beveridge Going, born before 1776, was head of a Patrick County
household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:106]. Burbridge Gowing was
taxable in Person County in 1793. He married Agnes Harris, daughter
of James Harris, 26 July 1810 Patrick County bond.

ii. Isham, born say 1770, married Fanny Going, 26 November 1792
Person County bond, with Patrick Mason bondsman. He was head of an
Orange County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:565] and 6 in
1810 [NC:876].

iii. Patsy, born say 1772, married Patrick Mason, 3 December 1790
Caswell County bond, Zachariah Hill bondsman.

iv. Sherwood2, born say 1772, married Ruth Bennett, 30 April 1793
Caswell County bond, James Gillaspy bondsman.

v. Allen, born say 1774, married Rebecca Goins, 7 April 1795 Person
County bond. He was head of a Person County household of 7 "other
free" in 1800 [NC:621] and 10 in 1810 [NC:625].


25. Joseph1 Gowen (Edward2, Edward1, William1, Michael1), born say
1730, was taxable in his own Lunenburg County household in the 1752
list of Field Jefferson [Tax List 1748-52, 1]. He was a "Black"
taxable in the 1755 Granville County summary list and a "Mulattoe" in
John Pope's 1759 tax list. On 1 December 1760 he received a patent
for 680 acres on both sides of Taylor's Creek, but sold this land
less than one year later on 11 August 1761 [DB E:143; D:253]. In 1761
he was taxable in John Pope's list with the notation, "Refuses to
list his wife." In 1765 he was listed by John Pope with the notation,
"Mullattoe, has a wife and other Family not listed." He was taxed
(with his son Nathaniel or a slave by that name?) in John Pope's 1768
list as "Joseph Gowin his Nat 2 tithes." He was last taxed in
Granville County in 1771. One of his children may have been

i. Nathaniel, born say 1755. He was brought to Granville County court
in 1773 with Robert Locklear on an unspecified charge, but they were
released on payment of their prison charges when no one appeared
against them [Minutes 1773-83, 1].


26. David2 Going (Edward2, Edward1, William1, Michael1), born say
1735, purchased land by deed proved in Halifax County, Virginia, in
August 1765 [Pleas 1764-7, 122]. He was sued in Pittsylvania County
in July 1768 for a debt of 84 pounds he owed from 1 August 1764 of
which he had paid 27 pounds in October 1767. He sold land by deed
proved in Pittsylvania County court in May 1773, and he sued Peter
Rickman on 25 June 1773 for a 3 pound debt due by account [Court
Records 1767-72, 219; 1772-5, 158, 211-2]. On 17 August 1778 he owned
land on both sides of Spoon Creek when the Henry County court allowed
him to build a water grist mill the creek [Orders 1778-82, 15]. He
was taxable in Henry County from 1782 to 1790: taxable on William,
Charles and Jacob Going in 1783 and 1784; listed with 3 unnamed sons
in 1785; 4 unnamed sons, 10 horses and 17 cattle in 1786; listed with
William and Jacob in 1787; 5 tithes in 1788 [Personal Property Tax
Lists, 1782-1830, frames 8, 37, 88, 218, 301, 352]. He received a
grant for 94 acres on Spoon Creek in Henry County on 30 March 1789
[Grants 19:297]. He was taxable in County from 1791 to 1800: listed
with 6 horses in 1791, 2 tithes from 1792 to 1795, 3 in 1797
[Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames 150, 207, 251, 288].
He sold land by deed proved in Patrick County on 29 May 1794 [Orders
1791-1800]. He was the father of

i. William, taxable in Henry County from 1783 to 1790 [Personal
Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 314, 352] and taxable in
Patrick County from 1791 to : listed with 2 tithes in 1791, called
"Sr." in 1803, listed on the Dan River in 1806, listed with 2 tithes
in 1809 and 1811, in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 and
1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 150, 177, 207,
234, 288, 343, 369, 396, 455, 515, 553, 598, 616]. His land on the
west side of Little Dan River in Patrick County adjoining William
Going's land was mentioned in a 19 August 1805 grant [Grants 54:212].

ii. Jacob, born about 1762, married Nancy Smith, 18 January 1792
Patrick County bond, John Camron surety. He was taxable in Henry
County from 1784 to 1787 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830,
frames 88, 253], taxable in Patrick County in 1791, 1792, 1798 and
1800 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames 151, 251, 288],
and head of a Stokes County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:
495]. He was about seventy years of age and living in Vermillion
County, Illinois, on 7 June 1832 when applied for a Revolutionary War
pension, stating that he was born in Henry County, Virginia, that he
lived in Kentucky for about thirty years, then lived for seven years
in Vincennes, Indiana [M805, reel 368, frame 0115, reel 368].

iii. Charles, born about 1763, taxable in Henry County from 1783 to
1790 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 302, 352],
taxable in Patrick County from 1791 to 1795 [Personal Property Tax
Lists, 1791-1823, frames 151, 177, 207]. He was about seventy years
old on 22 October 1833 when he applied for a Revolutionary War
pension, stating that he had been born in Henry County, lived there
until 1797, then moved to Kentucky and moved to Gallatin in 1815
[M805, reel 368, frame 0144].

iv. Martha, born say 1779, married Peter Burress, 7 June 1797 Patrick
County bond with the consent of David Going.


27. Shadrack1 Gowen (Edward2, Edward1, William1, Michael1) born
say 1737, listed his tithables in Halifax County, Virginia on 15
September 1763. He was presented by the court in May 1765 for
concealing a tithable who may have been his wife. The case against
him was dismissed in August 1766, perhaps on his payment of the tax.
He won a suit against John Bates in Halifax County court for about 2
pounds in July 1767. He purchased land by deed proved in Halifax
County court in August 1768 [Pleas 1764-7, 46, 358, 454; 6:221]. He
was head of a Halifax County household of 12 persons in 1782 [VA:23]
and 10 in 1785 [VA:89]. He was taxable in Halifax County from 1782 to
1785 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 7, 25, 35, 63].
His land on the west side of Little Dan River in Patrick County
adjoining William Going's land was mentioned in a 19 August 1805
grant [Grants 54:212]. He sold land by deed proved in Halifax County
on 17 November 1785 [Pleas 1783-6, 242]. He was taxable in Patrick
County from 1791 to 1805: listed with 2 tithables from 1791 to 1794,
3 in 1795 and 1796, 2 in 1798, taxed on 5 horses but not tithable
from 1800 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames
150, 193, 220, 251, 288, 343, 396, 425], exempted by the court on 31
May 1798 from paying tax on his person [Orders 1791-1800, n.p.]. He
made a Patrick County deed of gift to his grandson Shadrack Beasley
in 1803 [DB 2:268]. He left a 4 June 1805 Patrick County will which
was returned to court in December 1805, leaving his wife Hannah
furniture and the use of his house during her lifetime, to be divided
between Jerushe and Keziah Going at her death. He left his plantation
on both sides of the Little Dan River to his son Obediah, left a cow
to Rebecca Going, daughter of Fanny Going and wife of Edmond Bowlin,
left 5 shillings each to sons John Going, David Smith Going, James,
Claiborn, Solomon, Shadrack, and Caleb Going; left 5 shillings to
daughter Fanny Bowling, wife of Edmund Bowling and Hannah Beazley,
wife of Thomas Beazley [WB 1:80-1]. On 24 July 1806 his children
Jerusha, John, David Smith, James, Fanny, Claiborne, Shadrick and
Leaborne Gowing were in Grainger County, Tennessee, when they
appointed Henry Howell to sue Obediah Gowing for settling the
property unfairly and submitting a will which was not Shadrack
Gowing's [Patrick DB 3:87]. Shadrack was the father of

i. David4, born about 1754, head of a Halifax County, Virginia
household of 2 persons in 1782 [VA:24] and 4 in 1785 [VA:89]. He was
taxable in Halifax County from 1782 to 1793 and from 1796 to 1806:
called a "Mulo" from 1792 to 1806, living at Walne's in 1796 and
1797, a planter in the list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" living on
"D.C." (Difficult Creek?) with wife and two daughters over the age of
sixteen in 1801. He may have been the father of John and William
Going who were listed as "Mulo" in 1794 and 1795 [Personal Property
Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 7, 71, 302, 417, 442, 732, 819; 1800-12,
frames 59, 187, 517, 676]. He registered in Halifax County on 11
October 1802: aged about forty eight years, six feet and a half inch
high, light yellow Colour, inclining to white, straight hair...born
free [Register of Free Negroes, no.20]. He was head of a Wythe County
household of 8 "other free" in 1810. He was about seventy-six years
old on 26 February 1834 when he appeared in Hamilton County,
Tennessee court to apply for a pension for his services in the
Revolution. He testified that he entered the service in Halifax
County, Virginia, moved to Grayson County, Virginia, for three years,
then to Wythe County for ten years, then to Grainger County,
Tennessee, for fourteen years and lived in Hamilton County for one
year. His younger brother Laban Goens testified on his behalf
[M805-362, frames 27-30].

40 ii. James, born say 1758.

iii. Jerusha, born about 1760, head of a Stokes County household of 3
"free colored" in 1820. On 12 April 1821 she obtained a Patrick
County, Virginia, Certificate of Freedom: Jarussa Going, dark, aged
about 62; Polly Going, light complexion, aged 28; son Andrew Going 9,
all residing on Little Dan River. The certificate was recorded about
twenty years later in Highland County, Ohio [Turpin, Register of
Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 8].

iv. John7, born say 1760, head of a Halifax County, Virginia
household of 2 persons in 1782 [VA:23] and 4 in 1785 [VA:89], perhaps
the John Going who was taxable on the Dan River in Patrick County
from 1791 to 1814: taxable on 2 tithes in 1802, 1804, 1805, and 1810;
called John Going Sr. "Molatto" in 1812, in a list of "free Negroes &
Mulattoes" in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823,
frames 150, 343, 396, 537, 598, 614]. Administration on his estate
was granted Lindy P. Stovall on 12 October 1820 [Orders 1810-21, n.p.].

v. Nathaniel, born say 1766, taxable in Henry County from 1787 to
1790 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frame 253, 352],
taxable in Patrick County from 1791 to 1793 [Personal Property Tax
Lists, 1791-1823, frames 150, 177]. He died on 21 September 1793
after being struck in the head with a weeding hoe by Robert Hall
according to a 9 November 1793 Patrick County jury of inquest held at
Shadrack Going's plantation. Robert Hall was examined for the murder
but not charged, perhaps because his accusers could not legally
testify against him [WB 1:53]. Shadrack Going was granted
administration on his estate on 10 December 1793 [WB 1:6, 53].

vi. Hannah, married Thomas Beasley of Patrick County, Virginia.

vii. Claiborn2, taxable in Henry County from 1788 to 1790 (with the
notation "Dan River") [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames
301, 314, 352], taxable on the Dan River in Patrick County from 1791
to 1794 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames 150, 177, 193].

viii. Fanny, wife of Edmund Bowlin, and mother of Rebecca Going who
received a cow by her grandfather Shadrack's will.

ix. Laban, born about 1764, taxable in Henry County in 1790 [Personal
Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frame 352] and taxable in Patrick
County from 1791 to 1803 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1831,
frames 150, 207, 250, 370]. He was about seventy years old on 26
February 1734 when he testified in support of the pension application
of his brother David in Hamilton County, Tennessee court [M805-362,
frames 27-30].

x. Shadrack2, born say 1772, taxable in Patrick County from 1793 to
1798 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1831, frames 177, 207, 234,
250], head of a Grainger County Tennessee household of "other free"
in 1810.

xi. Caleb, married Polly Duncan, 9 June 1802 Patrick County bond,
Harden Dunham surety. He was taxable in Patrick County from 1800 to
1802 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames 288, 342] and
taxable in Henry County in 1803 [Personal Property Tax Lists,
1782-1830, frame 517].

xii. Obediah, born say 1777, taxable in Patrick County from 1798 to
1807 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 250, 288, 396,
487].


28. John7 Gowen (Edward2, Edward1, William1, Michael1), born say
1740, owned land on both sides of Blackberry Creek on 17 February
1777 when the Henry County, Virginia court allowed him to build a
water grist mill over the creek. The Henry County court appointed him
surveyor of the road from Cogar's path to John Cox's from 27 May 1784
to 25 May 1789 [Orders 1777-8, 5; 1782-5, 149; 1788-91, 44]. He was
taxable in Henry County from 1782 to 1801: taxable on 4 horses and 13
cattle in 1782; charged with Zephaniah, Claiborn and James Going's
tithe in 1783, listed with 2 unnamed sons in 1784; listed with
Claiborn and Asaiah Going in 1785; listed with 4 unnamed sons in
1786; listed with John and Zephaniah Going in 1787; listed with the
notation "Black Berry" when he was taxable on 4 tithes in 1788, 6 in
1789 and 5 in 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 15, 37, 86, 150, 158,
302, 315]. He received a grant for 156 acres on both sides of
Blackberry Creek adjoining his own land in Henry County on 14 April
1796 [Grants 35:153]. He left a 17 March 1801 Henry County will,
proved 27 July 1801, by which he lent his wife Elizabeth his stock
and household goods and directed that his land in Patrick and Henry
counties be sold and divided among his children Zephaniah, Nancy,
Susanna, Zedekiah, Simeon, John, Isaiah, Zachariah, Clabourn, and
Littleberry Going and Elizabeth Minor, wife of Hezekiah Minor. He
named John Stone and John Cox, Jr., his executors [WB 2:37-9]. His
estate was taxable on a free male tithable in 1802, 3 free males in
1803, 4 free males in 1804 [PPTL 1782-1830, frames 504, 517, 531.
Elizabeth Going was administratrix of an estate on 24 November 1803
when she sued Joseph Newman in Patrick County court [Orders 1800-10,
n.p.]. She was taxable in Henry County on 3 free tithes in 1805 and 2
in 1806 and 1807 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 553, 578]. The inventory of
her estate totaled $546 and was proved in March 1814 [WB 2:205-6].
John was the father of

i. Simeon, taxable in Henry County in 1807 and 1810 [Personal
Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 578, 591].

ii. Zephaniah, born say 1762, taxable in Henry County from 1783 to
1796 and in 1802: listed with 2 tithables in 1794 [Personal Property
Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 159, 302, 402, 428, 504], taxable in
Patrick County from 1797 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax Lists,
1791-1823, frames 234, 268]. He was about seventy-six years old and
living in Hawkins County, Tennesse on 18 December 1834 when he
applied for a Revolutionary War pension, stating that he had entered
the service in Henry County [M805, reel 368, frame 0134].

iii. Zedekiah, taxable in Patrick County in 1811, in a list of "free
Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1813 and 1814, probably identical to
Hezekiah Going who was taxable in Henry County in 1803 and in Patrick
County from 1804 to 1809, called a "Mulatto" in 1812 [Personal
Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames 396, 487, 553, 569, 598, 616,
664, 679, 696, 713].

iv. Claiborn1, born say 1764, taxable in Henry County from 1783 to
1787 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 253].

v. Isaiah, born say 1// taxable in Henry County in 1785 to 1791
[Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 315, 364].

vi. Littleberry, taxable in Henry County from 1807 to 1814: in a list
of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax
Lists, 1782-1830, frames 578, 591, 603, 641, 656].

vii. John, in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Henry County in
1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 641,
656], perhaps the John Going who was about forty-eight years old on
15 November 1824 when he registered as a free Negro in Pittsylvania
County.

viii. Elizabeth Minor, wife of Hezekiah Minor who was taxable in
Henry County in 1802 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frame
506].

ix. Nancy.

x. Susanna.

xi. Zachariah.


29. James4 Gowen (Mary1, Michael2, Christopher1, Michael1), born
say 1735, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 27 December
1757 when he sued John Cumbo for trespass [Orders 1757-9, 143]. He
received a grant for 376 acres adjoining Brewer, Perry, and Cook on
Carter's Creek in Brunswick County on 23 May 1763 [Patents 35:137].
He and his wife Amy sold 150 acres of this land in Meherrin Parish on
the south side of the Meherrin River on 22 September 1765 [DB 8:359].
Greensville County was formed from Brunswick County in 1781, and
James was head of a Greensville County household of 7 persons in 1783
[VA:54]. James, Henry Going, and Avent Massey posted bond in
Greensville County on 24 August 1786 for the illegitimate child Henry
Going had by Mary Hill [DB 1:173]. He voted in Greensville County in
1792, 1794, and 1795 [DB 1:451; 2:24, 135, 190]. He was taxable in
Greensville County from 1782 to; taxable on Edmund, Henry and James
Going's tithes in 1782; 3 tithes in 1783, 2 in 1784; 1 in 1785; 2
slaves from 1787 to 1792; 3 in 1794; 4 from 1799 to 1802; 6 from 1806
to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 4, 17, 22, 28,
42, 63, 107, 126, 136, 179, 244, 259, 273, 287, 302, 321, 336, 353,
372, 402] and head of a Greensville County household of 2 whites and
7 slaves in 1810 [VA:735]. He was probably the father of

i. Edmund, born say 1770, taxable in Greensville County in James
Going's household in 1782, charged with his own tax in 1790 [PPTL
1782-1850, frames 4, 107]. He married Mary Stewart, daughter of Dr.
Thomas Stewart, in Dinwiddie County [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 12]. On
10 November 1794 the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court found him not
guilty of stealing John Crew's cow [Orders 1792-5, 364]. He purchased
200 acres on Sandy Creek in Mecklenburg County from his father-in-law
on 5 November 1799 for 30 pounds, and he and his wife Polly sold 242
acres on Sandy Creek to Frederick Ivey while resident in Person
County, North Carolina [DB 10:176, 188-9]. He purchased 124 acres in
Person County from (his cousin) Frederick Going, and sold this land
by deeds proved in June 1801 Person County court. On 5 June 1804 he
mortgaged a slave named Patty and his farm animals in Person County
for 90 pounds [DB C:453].

ii. Henry, born say 1764, taxable in Greensville County from 1782 to
1811: taxable in James Going's household in 1782 and 1791; taxable on
3 slaves in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 63,
107, 126, 179, 259, 273, 287, 353, 372, 402, 415].

iii. James, Jr., born say 1766, taxable in Greensville County from
1782 to 1806: underage in 1782; taxed in his own household in 1784
and 1785; taxable in John Turner's household in 1788; taxable on a
slave from 1800 to 1804; 2 slaves in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List
1782-1850, frames 4, 22, 28, 63, 88, 244, 259, 273, 287, 302, 321,
336, 353].

iv. Benjamin, born say 1773, taxable in Greensville County from 1794
to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 179, 201, 231,
244, 259, 273, 287, 302, 321, 336, 353, 372, 402, 415]. He took the
oath of deputy sheriff in Greensville County on 11 May 1801 [Orders
1799-1806, 125].


30. Drury1 Going (Mary1, Michael2, Christopher1, Michael1), born
say 1738, was paid 5 pounds for a year's work according to the
account of the Brunswick County, Virginia estate of Sampson Lanier
which was returned 23 July 1759 [WB 3:297]. He purchased 50 acres in
Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, on the south side of the Meherrin
River on 28 November 1766 and purchased 223 acres on the north side
of Fountains Creek on 4 February 1779. Greensville County was formed
from this part of Brunswick County in 1781 [DB 8:505; 13:347]. He was
head of a Greensville County household of 4 persons in 1783 [VA:55]
and was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County from 1782 to
1801: taxable on an under-age tithable, 2 horses and 11 cattle in
1783; 1 tithe in 1784 and 1785; 4 in 1786; his own tithe and Thomas
Going's in 1787 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 3, 13,
22, 28, 34, 42, 63, 108, 136, 179, 201, 217, 231, 244, 273]. On 12
March 1782 the Greensville County court credited him with the value
of a gun impressed for the public use (during the Revolution) [Orders
1781-9, 13-14]. He sold 200 acres in Greensville County for 40 pounds
on 15 May 1785 [DB 1:106-7]. He was called Drury Going of Greensville
County on 1 October 1787 when he sold 50 acres on the south side of
the Meherrin River in Brunswick County adjoining Rebecca Stewart's
line [DB 14:366]. He may have been the father of

i. Frederick2, born about 1760, listed as John Phillips' tithable in
Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1784 [PPTL 1782-99, frame 92], William
Powell's tithable in Greensville County in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1850,
frame 45] and Thomas Stewart's tithable in Mecklenburg County,
Virginia, in 1788. He was charged with his own tax in Mecklenburg
County from 1790 to 1802: taxable on slave Phillis in 1796 and
taxable on slave Patsy in 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 223, 372,
544, 613, 713, 822, 873, 899]. He married Suckee Chavous, 9 March
1789 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, with a note from the bride's
father, Henry Chavous, Sr. Frederick Ivey was security, James
Stewart, Robert Singleton, and Belar Chavous witnesses. He purchased
250 acres on the east side of Blue Wing Creek in Person County, North
Carolina, on 16 September 1793 and sold 124 acres of this land while
a resident of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 6 July 1801 [DB A:147;
C:290]. On 14 April 1800 the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court
granted him a license to keep an ordinary at his house [Orders
1798-1801, 331]. He was a "free man of Color" who stated that he was
about seventy-eight years old on 21 March 1838 when he appeared in
Lawrence County, Alabama court to apply for a pension for services in
the militia during the Revolution. He stated that he was born on the
Meherrin River in the part of Brunswick County, Virginia, from which
Greensville was formed after the war, and he was about sixteen years
old when drafted. He was in Illinois on 2 December 1842 when Daniel
Hay wrote a letter enquiring about the status of his application
[M805-362, frames 14-24].

41 ii. Thomas4, born say 1761.

iii. Marcus/ Mark, born before 1776, probably one of Drury Going's
tithables when he and Thomas Going were ordered to work on the road
in Greensville County from the Falling Run to the county line on 25
June 1789 [Orders 1781-9, 416]. He married Sarah Jones, 29 September
1794 Greensville County bond, Robert Brooks Corn bondsman. On 23
September 1799 Mark and his wife Sally sold 35 acres adjoining Robert
Watkins, and he and his wife, together with Robert and Sally Watkins,
sold 9 acres which their wives had inherited from their father Thomas
Jones [DB 2:576, 577]. On 24 August 1799 he was paid as a witness for
William Lanier in the Greensville County suit of William Stewart
[Orders 1790-9, 635]. He was taxable in Greensville County from 1788
to 1803 and from 1810 to 1815: taxable in Drury Going's household in
1791; listed with Michael and Sally Gowing as "Mulattos" in 1813
[Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 63, 126, 136, 179, 188,
201, 217, 244, 259, 273, 287, 302, 402, 415, 446, 482]. He was a
"M"(ulatto) taxable on a horse in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton
County, in 1805 and 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806,
frames 807, 843] and head of a Greensville County household of 3
"free colored" in 1820 [VA:261].


31. John6 Gowen (Ann1, Michael2, Christopher1, Michael1), born say
1758, made his Robeson County will on 19 February 1800. He gave his
unnamed wife the right to use his plantation which was to revert to
his son John who was not yet twenty-one years of age when he wrote
the will [WB 1:60]. His wife was probably Sarah Gowen who was granted
administration on his estate by the 6 April 1802 Robeson County court
[Minutes 1797-1803, 193]. She conveyed land to Elizabeth Gowen by
deed proved in Robeson County court on 26 May 1812 [Minutes 1806-13].
His son was

i. John10, born say 1785, appeared in Robeson County court for an
unnamed offence on 2 July 1805 [Minutes 1803-06, 329]. He was one of
three John Goines counted as white in Robeson County in 1810 [NC:232,
239].


32. Joseph3 Going, born about 1747, was twelve years old when he
was bound as an apprentice planter to James Bunch on 28 November 1759
[Davis, Fredericksville Parish Vestry Book, 29]. He was taxable in
James Bunch's 1767 Trinity Parish, Louisa County household [Davis,
Louisa County Tithables, 10] and taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, from 1783 to 1792: taxable on 2 tithes from 1788 to
1792 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 29, 44, 76, 116,
153, 202, 252, 300, 346]. He may have been the father of

i. Thomas, born say 1772, taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, from 1789 to 1796 and from 1811 to 1813: listed
with "Jos. S" (either Joshua or Joseph's son) after his name in 1811
and 1812; called "J.S. a Mula" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List,
1782-1799, frames 202, 251, 300, 386, 419, 459, 481; 1800-1813,
frames 477, 521, 566].

ii. Anthony, born say 1776, taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, in 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frame 386]. His suit with
Joseph Going as his next friend against William Harris was dismissed
by the Albemarle County court on 12 August 1793 [Orders 1791-3, 480].


33. Benjamin1 Going, born say 1753, was taxable in Fredericksville
Parish, Albemarle County, from 1782 to 1800: taxable on 2 tithes from
1788 to 1790, 3 in 1791, 2 in 1792, 3 in 1793, 2 in 1794 and 1795, 3
in 1796 and 1797, 2 from 1798 to 1801; 3 from 1802 to 1807; 2 in
1809; 1 from 1810 to 1813: called a "Mula" in 1813 [Personal Property
Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 12, 29, 44, 59, 116, 153, 201, 252, 300,
347, 386, 419, 459, 481, 515, 555, 590; 1800-1813, frames 28, 73,
118, 160, 208, 251, 297, 344, 388, 435, 478, 522, 567]. He was head
of an Albemarle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:195].
He was the father of

i. Mary, born say 1773, daughter of Benjamin Goin who consented,
married Richard Broke (Brock), 3 January 1791 Albemarle County bond,
Charles Barnett bondsman.

ii. James6, born say 1776, taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, from 1792 to 1813; called "B.S." (Benjamin's son)
starting in 1806; called a "Mula" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax
List, 1782-1799, frames 347, 386, 419, 481, 459, 515, 555, 590;
1800-1813, frames 28, 74, 160, 208, 251, 297, 344, 388, 435, 478,
522, 567]. He married Jenny Ailstock, 2 December 1799 Albemarle
County bond, Michael Ailstock bondsman. On 7 May 1801 the Albemarle
County court ordered James and Benjamin Gowin to pay their debt of
$23 to William Frailey, subject to a credit of $14.50 paid on 10 July
1800 [Orders 1800-1, 362]. He was head of a Albemarle County
household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:196].

iii. Jesse, born say 1778, called Ben's son when he was taxable in
Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1798 to 1811 [Personal
Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 555, 590; 1800-1813, frames 28,
74, 117, 160, 208, 251, 297, 344, 388, 435, 478].

iv. Anderson, born say 1791, taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, from 1801 to 1810: called "B.S." (Benjamin's son)
from 1805 to 1807; called "J.S." (Joshua's son) in 1809 and 1810
[Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 74, 118, 160, 208,
251, 297, 344, 435, 478].

v. ?Agnes/ Aggy, married Richard Newman, 7 September 1793 Albemarle
County bond, Benjamin Going bondsman.

vi. Daniel4, born say 1783, taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, in 1801 and 1802 from 1810 to 1813: called B.S.
(Benjamin's son); called a "Mula" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax
List, 1800-1813, frames 28, 73, 435, 479, 522, 567].


34. Joshua Going, born say 1755, was a "yellow" complexioned
soldier from Louisa County who was drafted in the Revolutionary War
[NSDAR, African American Patriots, 150]. He was taxable in
Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1783 to 1813: taxable
on 2 tithes in 1792, 1793, and 1796; 3 tithes in 1797; 2 from 1798 to
1800; 2 from 1802 to 1804; and 2 in 1809; called a "Mula" in 1813
[Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 29, 44, 59, 76, 116,
153, 202, 252, 300, 347, 386, 419, 459, 481, 516, 554, 591;
1800-1813, frames 29, 74, 117, 161, 208, 252, 297, 344, 435, 478,
522, 567]. He was the father of

i. John, born say 1777, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle
County, from 1793 to 1796 and called "Jos. S." (either Joshua or
Joseph's son) from 1805 to 1813; called a "Mula" in 1813 [Personal
Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 386, 419, 459, 481; 1800-13,
252, 297, 344, 388, 434, 478, 522, 567].

ii. Jesse, born say 1776, taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, from 1794 to 1813: called Joshua's son; called a
"Mula" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 419,
459, 481, 516, 554, 590; 1800-1813, frames 29, 74, 118, 160, 208,
251, 297, 344, 522, 567]. He married Becky Ailstock, 2 December 1799
Albemarle County bond, Michael Ailstock bondsman, and was head of a
Albemarle County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:196].

iii. David5, born say 1780, taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, from 1802 to 1813: called Joshua's son in 1810;
called "little David" in 1812 and 1813; a Mula" in 1813 [Personal
Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 118, 435, 479, 522, 567]. He was
head of an Albemarle County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:
196].

iv. Caty, born say 1788, married James Tyree, 21 December 1807
Albemarle County bond, Joshua Gowen bondsman and father of the bride.

v. ?Hezekiah, born say 1790, taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, from 1810 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List,
1800-1813, frames 435, 567].

vi. ?Jonathan, born say 1795, taxable in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle County, in 1812 and 1813: listed with "Jos. S." (Joshua's
son) after his name in 1812; called "J.S. a Mula" in 1813 [Personal
Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 521, 566].


35. Sherrod1 Going, born say 1762, was a "yellow" complexioned
soldier born in Louisa County [NSDAR, African American Patriots,
150]. He received a grant for 196 acres on the waters of Buck
Mountain Creek in Albemarle County on 30 September 1783 and 31 acres
on the north side of the Green Mountain on 1 June 1798 [Grants H:575;
40:215]. He was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County,
from 1783 to 1813: listed with 2 tithables from 1810 to 1812; 3 in
1813 when he was called a "Mula" [Personal Property Tax List,
1782-1799, frames 29, 44, 59, 76, 116, 153, 251, 347, 386, 419, 459,
481, 516, 554, 591; 1800-1813, frames 28, 74, 118, 161, 207, 251,
297, 344, 388, 434, 478, 522, 566]. He married Susannah Simmons, 5
June 1791 Albemarle County bond. He sued Joseph Hicks for assault and
battery in Albemarle County court on 12 August 1797, but the jury
found for the defendant. On 18 August 1797 he was accused of stealing
a quantity of corn from Absolem Clarkson and was ordered to be tried
at the district court in Charlottesville [Orders 1795-8, 378, 381-2].
He was head of an Albemarle County household of 12 "other free" in
1810 [VA:196] and 9 "free colored" in 1820. He received a pension for
his service in the 14th Virginia Regiment during the Revolution. He
owned 217 acres in Albemarle County when he made his pension
application, describing himself to the court at Charlottesville as "a
colored man and very illiterate" [National Archives pension file
W7545; Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 35]. He was the father of

i. Ann, daughter of Sherod Gowen, married John Gowen, 3 January 1810
Albemarle County bond, Sherod Gowen surety.

ii. Jincy, married Noah Tate. On 22 November 1844 Noah and his wife
Jincy made an Albemarle County deed of trust for land they inherited
from her parents Sherod and Susan Goings [DB 42:444-5].


Other members of the family in Albemarle County were

i. Rhoda, listed as a "Mula" in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle
County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frame 566].

ii. Sally, listed as a "Mula" in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle
County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frame 567].

iii. Elizabeth, head of a Albemarle County household of 6 "other
free" in 1810 [VA:196].


36. Agnes2 Going, born say 1748, was taxable on (her son?) John
Going's tithe and 2 horses in the upper district of Henrico County
from 1787 to 1791 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 124,
143, 195, 217, 271]. She was taxable on 97 acres in the upper
district of Henrico County from 1799 to 1807 [Land Tax List
1799-1816]. Her children married white and were considered white. She
was apparently the mother of

i. David, Jr., born say 1764, taxable in the upper district of
Henrico County from 1785 to 1791 and taxable on a slave from 1806 to
1813 when he was listed as a white man [Personal Property Tax List
1782-1814, frames 73, 90, 195, 271, 487, 532, 636, 662, 722, 744]. He
married Clawey Webb, 17 July 1789 Henrico County bond, surety John
Geoine, who testified that Clawey was over twenty-one years of age,
Anne Going witness. He was taxable on 100 acres from 1805 to 1815 and
taxable on 193 acres adjoining John Harlow in 1816 [Land Tax List
1799-1816].

ii. Mary, born say 1769, gave her own consent to her marriage to
Meredith Childers, 23 December 1791 Henrico County bond, surety John
Goyne, witness Aggy Goyne.

iii. John, born say 1770, his tax charged to Agnes Going in 1787.

iv. Milly, married John Harlow, 21 September 1792 Henrico County
bond, consent of Agness Goyne, David Going surety, John Geoine witness.

v. Ann, of lawful age, daughter of Agnes Goine, married Dudley Miner,
22 December 1795 Henrico County bond, Meredith Childers surety.

vi. Nancy, married Patrick Childers, 12 December 1797 Henrico County
bond.


37. William4 Gowen (John1, William2, Thomas1, Michael1), born say
1725, received a deed of gift of 100 acres in Lunenburg from his
parents, John2 and Mary Gowen, on 10 June 1761 and sold this land
while resident in Lunenburg County on 30 December the same year. He
was residing in Orange County, North Carolina, six months later on 6
July 1762 when he sold a further 100 acres adjoining this land in
Lunenburg County [DB 7:153, 302]. In November 1763 (his uncle?)
Alexander Going had a petition against him in Orange County court
[Minutes I:232]. He may have been the William Gowen who received a
patent for 300 acres in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on both
sides of Pocket Creek on 9 November 1764 and was taxable on one white
tithe in 1767 [N.C. Genealogy, XXI:3132]. He was head of a Moore
County household of 10 whites in 1790, one white male over 16, four
under 16, and five white females [NC:44]. He may have been the same
William Gowen who was head of a Moore County household of 10 "other
free" in 1790 [NC:43], 9 in 1800 [NC:60], and 6 in 1810 [NC:615].
Moore County records were destroyed in a courthouse fire, so there is
no further record of him. His children were probably those counted as
"other free" in Moore County:

i. Henry, head of a Moore County household of 5 "other free" in 1800
[NC:60] and 9 in 1810 [NC:615].

ii. Levy, head of a Moore County household of 5 "other free" in 1800
[NC:62], 8 in 1810 [NC:615], and he may have been the _ive Goins
counted in Moore County with 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:307].

iii. Edward5, head of a Moore County household of 2 "other free" in
1810 [NC:615] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:308].

iv. __lin, head of a Moore County household of 3 "free colored" in
1820 [NC:317].


38. Thomas2 Gowen (John1, William2, Thomas1, Michael1), born say
1732, was taxable in the 1751 Lunenburg County household of (his
father?) John2 Gowen in the list of Richard Witton [Tax List
1748-52]. On 30 May 1752 he purchased 150 acres in Granville County
on both sides of Taylors Creek at the mouth of Spring Branch [DB B:
53]. He was in the Granville County list of Osborn Jeffreys,
adjoining Michael and Edward Going, taxable on one white and one
black poll in 1753 and one black poll in 1754. He was called a
"Mulatto" in Captain Osborne Jeffreys' Company in the 8 October 1754
Muster Roll of the Granville County Regiment of Colonel William Eaton
[Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 718]. In the 1761 list of
John Pope he had Moses Gowen in his household with the notation
"Refuses to List his wife," and in 1764 he and Moses were taxed in
John Pope's list for St. John's Parish as two white polls. In 1768 he
was tithable on three persons: himself, John Gowin, and Alston
Hopkins who was white. In 1780, called Thomas Gowen Sr., he was taxed
on an assessment of 997 pounds, and he was taxed on 150 acres in
1785. He was head of a Granville County household of 4 free males and
5 free females in the 1786 state census in Dutch District. On 25
January 1788 he sold his land in Granville [DB O:555], and he may
have moved to Montgomery County where Thomas Gain was counted in the
1790 census with 3 white males and 5 white females in his household
[NC:164]. His 7 February 1797 Montgomery County will named only his
five youngest children. His children were

i. Moses4, born circa 1749 since he was taxable in 1761 in the list
of John Pope. He may have been the Moses Jewil, alias Gowin, who
purchased 100 acres on the south side of the Tarr River on both sides
of Middle Creek in Granville County on 2 February 1768 [DB H:481].

ii. John5, born circa 1756, not identified as Thomas' son but taxed
in his 1768 household.

iii. Vini, married ____ Hardister.

iv. Burgess, born 1780/4, died in Montgomery County in 1849.

v. Burton, counted as white in the Randolph County census through 1830.

vi. Hali.

vii. Elizabeth.


39. William6 Gowen (James2, Edward2, Edward1, William1, Michael1)
was born before 1748 since he was taxable in the Granville County
household of his father James2 Gowen in 1759. He may have been the
William Going who was deceased by 10 November 1783 when his thirteen-
year-old daughter Nancy was ordered bound apprentice to William Cope
by the Chatham County court. His children (no race mentioned) bound
apprentice in Chatham County were

i. Nancy, born about 1770, ordered bound apprentice to William Cope
by the 10 November 1783 Chatham County court [Minutes 1781-85, 26].

ii. John9, born about 1771, about twelve years old on 10 November
1783 when he was ordered bound an apprentice farmer to William Riddle
by the Chatham County court and bound to James Sutter in May 1785
[Minutes 1781-85, 55].

iii. Elizabeth, born about 1772, about twelve years old on 8 November
1784 when she was bound apprentice to William Douglass by the Chatham
County court [Minutes 1781-85, 45].

iv. Ann3, born about 1774, about ten years old on 8 November 1784
when she was bound apprentice to James Howard [Minutes 1781-85, 45].

v. William7, born about 1775, bound an apprentice farmer to George
Desmukes on 10 November 1783. He was and insolvent taxpayer in
Chatham County in 1806 [Minutes 1781-85, 26, 157].

vi. Mary3, born say 1777, no age mentioned when she was removed from
William Cope's care in Chatham County [Minutes 1781-85, 45].


40. James Going, born say 1758, was taxable in Henry County from
1783 to 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 38, 88, 301, 352]. He purchased
for 5 pounds 201 acres on both sides of the Dan River on 21 October
1784 [DB 1:62]. He was taxable on the Dan River in Patrick County
from 1791 to 1807: called "Sr." starting in 1793, listed with 2
tithables in 1797, 3 in 1801 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823,
frames 150, 234, 251, 268, 315, 487]. He left a 24 August 1807
Patrick County will, administration on which was granted to his widow
Nancy Going on 29 October 1807, leaving $25 to his daughter Peggy
Adams, 5 shillings to his daughter Prudence Goin, 5 shillings to his
son Stephen, $55 to his son William Goin, $150 to his daughter Betsy
Goin when his youngest children came to age and the remaining to be
equally divided between the youngest Arthur, Isaac and Nancy Goin.
And his widow was to have an equal child's part. His estate was
valued at $520 [WB 1:106, 247]. On 28 April 1809 the Patrick County
court appointed Benjamin Going guardian for Arther, Isaac and Nancy
Going, heirs of James Going, deceased [Orders 1800-10, n.p.]. On 11
January 1810 his widow Nancy Goins appointed Benjamin Goins of
adjoining Surry County, North Carolina, as her attorney to sue Harman
Bowman of Surry County [Surry DB 3:351] and she sued Harmon Bowman in
Patrick County on 27 April 1810 [Orders 1810-21, n.p.]. James was the
father of

i. Peggy, born say 1778, married Bartholomew Adams, 8 July 1796, with
the consent of her father Jesse James Going, Caleb Going surety.

ii. Prudence, a witness with Nancy Going, Margaret Adams, and William
Going on 26 April 1811 in the Patrick County suit of the Commonwealth
v. Thomas Beazley and Elizabeth Bellar for the crime of bigamy. The
court dismissed the suit when it met for adjournment on 30 May 1811
on the grounds that the adjournment of the last examining court had
been illegal and the court had not cognizance over them [Orders
1810-21, n.p.].

iii. Stephen2, born say 1785, married Nancy Going, daughter of John
Going, 24 February 1807 Patrick County bond, Obediah Going surety.
Stephen was taxable in Patrick County from 1806 to 1814: in a list of
"free Negroes & Mulattos" in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax
Lists, 1782-1830, frames 455, 537, 598, 616]. He was head of a
Patrick County household of 6 whites in 1820 and 9 "free colored" in
1830.

iv. William.

v. Betsy.

vi. Arthur, born say 1795, taxable in Patrick County in a list of
"free Negroes & Mulattos" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax Lists,
1782-1830, frames 587, 598].

vii. Isaac, underage in 1807.

viii. Nancy, married Robert Harris, 1816 Patrick County bond.


41. Thomas4 Going (Drury1, Mary1, Michael2, Christopher1,
Michael1), born say 1761, head of a Greensville County, Virginia
household of 1 person in 1783 [VA:55]. He was taxable in Greensville
County from 1783 to 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850,
frames 13, 107, 126, 136, 162, 188, 231, 244, 259, 273, 302]. He
married Sarah Jones, 24 July 1794 Greensville County bond, William
Dungill surety. He was probably the Thomas Gowen who was head of a
Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810
[NC:21]. His children may have been

i. Frederick3, born in Virginia about 1794, head of a Halifax County
household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:148], still living in
Halifax County when he was counted in the 1860 census: Frederick
Going, 66 yrs, Male, Mulatto, farmer, $100 real estate/$148 personal
estate, b. Va. Roda, 70 years, Female, Mulatto, b. N.C. He sold land
in Halifax to Isham Mills by a deed proved 21 November 1836 and
purchased land by deed proved 19 February 1838. He was permitted to
carry his gun by order of the Halifax County court on 17 August 1841
[Minutes 1832-46].

ii. Drury2, head of a Halifax County household of 11 "free colored"
in 1820 [NC:148] and 6 in 1830.

iii. Heartwell, permitted to carry his gun by order of the Halifax
County court on 17 August 1841.

iv. Jerry, born in North Carolina circa 1803, permitted to carry his
gun by order of the Halifax County court on 17 August 1841. He was
still living in Halifax County in 1860 at age fifty-seven with
Louvenia, age fifty. He had $264 real and $328 personal estate.


Others counted in South Carolina in 1810 were

i. Sarah, head of a Greenville District household of 4 "other
free" [SC:567].

ii. Catherine, head of a Colleton District household of 7 "other
free" [SC:626].


Others in Virginia were

i. John Goings, born say 1695, a "negro" servant of Roodolphus
Malbone on 5 September 1716 when the Princess Anne County court
ordered that he receive forty lashes on the complaint of Tully Smyth
[Minutes 1709-17, 222].

ii. Amy, mother of an illegitimate son Lewis Goings who was bound out
by the Essex County court on 21 June 1784 [Orders 1784-7, 12].

iii. Nancy, issued a certificate of freedom by the Essex County court
on 20 March 1787 [Orders 1784-7, 311]. She may have been the Nancy
Going who registered in Middlesex County on 2 June 1802: born free;
46 years of age; 5'2-1/4"; yellow complexion [Register of Free
Negroes 1800-60, p.15].

iv. William8, head of a Montgomery County household of 7 "other free"
in 1810 [VA:661].

v. Fanny, born about 1785, registered in Botetourt County on 3
February 1806: a Dark Mulatto, 5 feet four Inches, Born free, by 14th
Augt. Certificate from Clk of Henrico [Free Negroes &c Registered in
the Clerks Office of Botetourt County, no.7].


Those counted in Louisiana in 1810 were

i. Benjamin2, head of a household of 4 "other free" in Opelousas [LA:
316].

ii. Philip4, head of a household of 3 "other free" in Opelousas [LA:
305].

iii. James7, head of a household of 3 "other free" in Opelousas [LA:
305].


Endnotes:

1. The name Mihill Gowen appears like Mihill Gowree in the 1668
patent, but the 11 September 1717 inquisition refers to the same land
as belonging to Mihil Goen / Michael Gowen.

2. Few other Gloucester County records have survived.

3. Shirley Whatley was living in Shocco District of Granville
County, North Carolina, in the 1762 list of Constable John Gibbs
[NCGSJ XIII:107].

4. Patrick County, Virginia, adjoins Stokes County, North Carolina.

5. Although Fanny and Isham Going shared the Going name, the bride
and groom were not necessarily closely related since the family was
quite large by 1792.






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