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From: (The Bibliographer)
Subject: Re: Malcom III of Scotland
Date: 10 Jul 2001 10:56:43 -0400
References: <Vgw27.117$sV2.7133@eagle.america.net>


In article <Vgw27.117$>,
D. Spencer Hines <> wrote:
>According to George Conn,
>"De duplici statu religionis apud Scots" (Rome, 1628), the rest of the
>relics, together with those of Malcolm, were acquired by Philip II of
>Spain, and placed in two urns in the Escorial.

Yes, Conn, writing for Cardinal Francesco Barberini, giuniore, was the
first to mention that the relics of Malcolm and Margaret had been taken to
Spain. The work can be had through interlibrary loan. Here is the complete
citation:

Title: Georgii Coni De duplici statu religionis apud Scotos libri duo
: Ad illustriss.mum Franciscum S.R.E. Card. Barbarinum Magn Britanni
protectorem.
Author(s): Conn, George, d. 1640.
Publication: Romae : typis Vaticanis,
Year: 1628
Description: [12], 176, [8] p. : p., coat of arms ;, 23 cm. (4to)
Language: Latin
References: NUC pre-1956,; BM,; BN,; Folger,; 119:645;; 42:725;;
31:586;; 6:282.
SUBJECT(S)
Note(s): First printing./ Signatures: a6 A-Z4./ On the title, the
family arms of Cardinal Barberini, the Papal Nuncio to Great Britain,
mantled with a cardinal's hat in red.
Class Descrpt: LC: BX1497.C752
Other Titles: De duplici statu religionis apud Scotos libri duo; De
duplici statu religionis apud Scotos libri duo.
Accession No: OCLC: 10050036

Location Library Code
IL UNIV OF CHICAGO CGU
IN INDIANA UNIV IUL
MA HARVARD UNIV, HOUGHTON LIBR HHG
NJ PRINCETON UNIV PUL
NY HOBART & WILLIAM SMITH COL ZEM
NY NEW YORK PUB LIBR RES LIBR NYP
TX UNIV OF TEXAS, AUSTIN, HARRY RANSOM HRH


When, however, Bishop
>Gillies of Edinburgh applied through Pius IX for their restoration to
>Scotland, they could not be found."

This mention is an error in the old <CE>. It's Gillis not "Gillies" and he
was not bishop "of Edinburgh," but rather an episcopal vicar apostolic for
the (then) Eastern Region of the Scottish Mission. Here is <his> biography
from the <CE>:

James Gillis

Scottish bishop; b. at Montreal, Canada, 7 April, 1802; d. at
Edinburgh, 24 February 1864. He was the only son of a native of
Banffshire, who had emigrated to Canada and married there Educated in
the Sulpician college at Montreal, where he acquired a perfect
knowledge of French, he came to Scotland in 1816, and next year
entered the seminary at Aquhorties, studying afterwards at St
Nicholas's College in Paris, and at Issy. He was ordained priest on 9
June, 1827, and was stationed at Edinburgh, where he was preaching
soon attracted attention. He visited France in 1829 to collect money
for his church, and in 1831 to raise funds for the foundation of an
Ursuline convent--the first religious house established in Scotland
since the sixteenth century--which was opened in 1835.

In July, 1838, he was consecrated at Edinburgh as Bishop of Limyra and
Coadjutor of the Eastern District. A subsequent visit to Paris, where
he was much esteemed, resulted in the acquisition of what remained of
the library of the Scotch College, and in the promise of an annual
grant to Scotland from the Society for the Propagation of the Faith.
In 1852 Bishop Gillis succeeded Bishop Carruthers as Vicar Apostolic
of the Eastern District. During his twelve years tenure of this office
he did much for the advancement of Catholicism, founding many new
missions, introducing several religious orders (including Jesuits,
Oblates of Mary, and Sisters of Mary) into his district, and receiving
into the Church many converts, among them Viscount and Viscountess
Feilding, afterwards Earl and Countess of Denbigh. In 1857 he preached
in Orlans cathedral an eloquent panegyric, in French, of Joan of Arc
(published in London in the same year), receiving in return from the
Mayor of Orlans the heart of King Henry II of England, who had died
at Chinon, on the Loire, in 1189. Bishop Gillis was buried in St.
Margaret's convent, his own foundation, on 26 February, 1864. The nuns
of St. Margaret's are in possession of his library.

D.O. HUNTER-BLAIR
The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VI

As far as I know, the last person to assert that the urns in the Escorial
for still known and visible was Alban Butler, in his second edition. Here
is a citation for that:

Title: The lives of the fathers, martyrs, and other principal saints:
: compiled from original monuments, and other authentick records.
Author(s): Butler, Alban, 1711-1773.; Butler, Charles,; 1750-1832.
Publication: London : [s.n.],
Year: 1756-1759
Description: 4 v. in 6 : p., ill. ;, 21 cm.
Language: English
Responsibility: Illustrated with the remarks of judicious modern
criticks and historians.
Accession No: OCLC: 15337680

Location Library Code
CA UNIV OF CALIFORNIA, LA CLU
GA EMORY UNIV, PHILOSOPHY & RELIGION, ARL 2 RQD
GA EMORY UNIV, PITTS THEOL LIBR EMT
MA HARVARD DIVINITY SCH BHA
OH COLLEGE OF MOUNT ST JOSEPH CMJ
EU UNIV COL DUBLIN U5D


--
Regards, Frank Young
703-527-7684
Post Office Box 2793, Kensington, Maryland 20891
"Videmus nunc per speculum in aenigmate... Nunc cognosco ex parte"


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