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Archiver > GEN-MEDIEVAL > 2002-04 > 1017789507


From: "Warren B. Hapke" <>
Subject: Re: Medieval Latin - Online Dictionaries-New Query
Date: Tue, 2 Apr 2002 23:18:27 +0000 (UTC)
References: <FRLp8.6215$ml2.476680@newsread1.prod.itd.earthlink.net>, <3ca7967c.384559185@enews.newsguy.com>, <44ba6973.0203312044.2e7f4259@posting.google.com>


In soc.history.medieval Laura Lee Bayne-Slimp <> wrote:
: Hi Brian and Daniel,
: I've managed to borrow an antique (1920s) edition of Capelli from SMU,
: but had to return it when it was recalled. I've looked at the _Record
: Interpreter_ (and photocopied quite a bit of it), but am concerned

If I'm reading a somewhat cryptic bibliographic note correctly, Cappelli's
work was last revised by him in 1929, and later editions are basically
reprints, not revisions. If that's the case, your "antique" edition
is probably fine.

: about its reliability as what I'm looking at is French (Bersuire's
: allegorical commentary), so I'm worried that the English shorthand
: would be idiosyncratic. I know that, like monastic scripts,
: abbreviations would vary depending on the conventions of the various
: local scriptoria. I can puzzle through most of them with the
: references I've managed to find, but have trouble when squiggles are
: involved. Capelli is ideal because of its historical presentation of
: the scripts and abbreviations. Any other copies being sold
: (resonably)? Thanks to all for the advice (those who posted on list
: and replied off list). Cheers. Laura

The Latin abbreviation system, from what I know, tended to be the
most elaborate, and the conventions for works in vernacular languages
tended to be less elaborate (and less difficult for us). I found
Cappelli reasonably useful for manuscripts created outside Italy
(which was the focus of much of his research).

If you go to http://www.abebooks.com/ and type in "Adriano Cappelli"
for the author search, you will find four listings. The only one
for sale in the US (which would minimize shipping costs) is listed
for $45.00; you can decide if that's reasonably or not.

Stephen Reimer of the University of Alberta has an excellent
set of pages on manuscript studies at

http://www.ualberta.ca/~sreimer/ms-course.htm

However, he doesn't have any abbreviations cataloged. He mentions that
someone created Macintosh software that reproduces the catalog of
abbreviations found in Cappelli, but the link didn't work for me.

Warren B. Hapke



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