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Archiver > GEN-MEDIEVAL > 2002-05 > 1020438195


From: Doug Weller <>
Subject: Re: Oppida in Irish Culture; was: Ancient Irish 'Pedigrees' (was Re: History & Genealogy or the Mathematical Study of Genealogy?)
Date: Fri, 3 May 2002 16:03:15 +0100
References: <3CD003C5.4000804@dcn.davis.ca.us>, <aapn9v$v0g$1@newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk>, <3CD22C78.9020301@dcn.davis.ca.us>


In article <>,
says...
> "The debate over who and
> what can legitimately be
> termed "Celtic" has been
> raging for over a decade
> in academic circles."
> Simon James is of the belief
> "that probably all cases of
> ethnogenesis arise from such
> a sense of common threat
> from external Others" or
> "perceived common cultural
> threat".
>
> Emergent nobilities as "part
> of the wider circle of their
> peers," are the "privileged
> few, apparently elites
> dominant in religion,
> politics and war."
> http://pages.britishlibrary.net/ccs/interviews/simon-james.html
>
I have his book. Your first quote explains the development of the concept
of 'Celtic' over the past few centuries, since the medieval period. You
are misusing this completely if you think it backs up any of your claims.

You seem unable to take part in any discussion. How about starting off by
admitting there were no oppida in Ireland?

Doug

--
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