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Archiver > GEN-MEDIEVAL > 2003-06 > 1054701617


From: "Phil Moody" <>
Subject: RE: Y Chromosomes Sketch New Outline of British Isles
Date: Tue, 3 Jun 2003 23:41:56 -0500
In-Reply-To: <3EDD55BA.4027D8B9@mail.mc.maricopa.edu>


Allen Meyer wrote:

It's not clear what the connection between Moody's rant and the excerpt
from
the NY Times on a genetic study of Y chromosomes in the British Isles
may be.

PLM: Might I request that you differentiate between which "Moody" you
happen to be ridiculing at any specific time!? You are referring to "Dr.
Moody", and as I have no degree, perhaps this would be the simplest way
to make the distinct between us?

Best Wishes,
Phil Moody

-----Original Message-----
From: Allen Meyer [mailto:]
Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2003 9:13 PM
To:
Subject: Re:Y Chromosomes Sketch New Outline of British Isles

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It's not clear what the connection between Moody's rant and the excerpt
from
the NY Times on a genetic study of Y chromosomes in the British Isles
may be.

For example, what assumptions about Y chromosomes does he rail against?
That
they exist, that they're passed down in the male line, that you can
compare
populations on the basis of types of Y chromosome prevalence rates?
These are
all accepted by modern science.

He rails against statistics; perhaps he fails to understand that at
bottom all
modern science is statistical in nature.

Perhaps he seems to think modern genetics has nothing to offer
genealogical
research. A hypothetical example may suggest otherwise: Suppose there
were a
documented chain of descent that had the current generation all
descended from
Normans who came to England at the time of Conquest. But, say, genetic
analysis of the Y chromosomes in this generation indicated that the male
members now possess Y chromosomes incompatible with the genealogical
documentation. This would mean that somewhere along the line some lady
had a
dalliance, perhaps with a serf or page. One couldn't say when the
dalliance
occurred, from solely this data, but knowledge of the mutation rate
might
indicate the rough period when it happened.

For those of us interested in the movement of peoples in the prehistoric
period, this study is quite fascinating as it indicates that the
currently
isolated, remnant population of the Basques in fact represents a much
more
widespread population that was a substrate of the British Isles, as well
as of
Iberia. And also that the Continental Celts who later settled in the
British
Isles may have been fairly low in numbers, but managed to transfer
language to
the original British population. The purpose of the study seems to bear
primarily on this, and so the impetus to wrath by some genealogists is
mystifying.

Allen Meyer


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