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Archiver > GEN-MEDIEVAL > 2009-05 > 1241591763


From: Renia <>
Subject: Re: Armiger means Esquire
Date: Wed, 06 May 2009 09:36:03 +0300
References: <d540afaa-1fe4-4328-bf5d-f8778f98a89a@d2g2000pra.googlegroups.com><mailman.1792.1241586286.2001.gen-medieval@rootsweb.com><4f894d57-2dc7-4e29-b9d3-382c303f2cb0@s38g2000prg.googlegroups.com><gtr92i$ip7$1@news.motzarella.org><ebd83571-cdcd-4ff6-aaad-4eb29d7c4375@f41g2000pra.googlegroups.com>
In-Reply-To: <ebd83571-cdcd-4ff6-aaad-4eb29d7c4375@f41g2000pra.googlegroups.com>


wrote:
> On May 6, 12:00 am, Renia <> wrote:
>
> < Armiger is not a style of address. However, it is a descriptive term
> < used in parish registers, deeds, public school records, etc, to show
> the
> < status of the person.
>
> Do you mean the Latin word or the English word?


The word armiger has long been part of the English language though it is
Latin in origin. It is not a style of address.

By the English word, I presume you mean "Esquire", which is a word which
is French in origin. This is also not a style of address.

As we have been arguing, these two words do not have the same meaning.


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