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Archiver > GEN-MEDIEVAL > 2010-04 > 1271088291


From: Renia <>
Subject: Re: Palliser
Date: Mon, 12 Apr 2010 19:18:43 +0300
References: <mailman.113.1271033221.20086.gen-medieval@rootsweb.com><hpuog4$mc9$1@news.eternal-september.org><588f3fc5-f8f2-45cf-a538-c8468b836c73@30g2000yqi.googlegroups.com><hpvg3m$9qc$1@news.eternal-september.org><nltaylor-79FB76.12104612042010@earthlink.us.supernews.com>
In-Reply-To: <nltaylor-79FB76.12104612042010@earthlink.us.supernews.com>


Nathaniel Taylor wrote:
> In article <hpvg3m$9qc$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
> Renia <> wrote:
>
>> Matt Tompkins wrote:
>>> On Apr 12, 10:17 am, Renia <> wrote:
>>>> My main area of interest, at the moment, is how the Palliser (Palicer,
>>>> etc) surname moved from Languedoc and/or Catalonia to the manor of
>>>> Wakefield in Yorkshire by 1315.
>>>
>>> Renia, are you discounting all possibility that the surname arose
>>> independently in the two locations? Surely it is possible, even
>>> probable, that there is no connection between the Yorkshire Pallisers
>>> and those in Langudoc/Catalonia?
>>
>> There are more Pallisers in Spain than there are in England, of that
>> spelling. Pelissier abounds in France, but during the medieval period,
>> assorted spellings were around. I have not found one Palliser in England
>> prior to 1315, nor even a remote variant of it. Besides, the family in
>> the Languedoc shares the coat of arms of the Pallisers of Yorkshire.
>
> That's interesting -- are the arms attested that early (14th c.) for
> both families? And where was the family in Languedoc?
>
> As it's an essentially occupational surname, the default assumption
> would be that those who used it in different locales were unlikely to be
> related, but the use of arms may link the two families -- essentially
> tradespeople made good, early, and established as armigerous in both
> England and Plantagenet Guyenne during the Hundred Years' War?


It's long been held to have been an occupational surname, but I think
that is an error. In England, the origins are within a 30-mile radius,
and the same was true even early in the 20th century, notwithstanding
those who drifted in and out of London. This suggests a common origin
for English Pallisers, rather than one actually springing from a "maker
of palings and fences". The occupational word was still used in the 16th
century, and the earliest "palisers" I have found, already had other
surnames.

In Spain, the occupational word derives from someone who works with furs
or pelts.

The Pallicers in Langedoc came from Castres, near Albi, and had a
castle, according to internet sources. They escaped from the
Albingensian Crusade, and settled in Catalonia. However, some seem to
have stayed in the Castres area.


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