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From: "Geo." <>
Subject: [TRIVVIES] From the CARLISLE PATRIOT, Saturday, July 22,1843 / DOOGAN THE ESCAPED CONVICT.
Date: Sat, 12 May 2007 14:54:43 +0800


Posted with permission of the transcriber, Barb. Baker.

Geo.


CARLISLE PATRIOT, Saturday, July 22, 1843 / DOOGAN THE ESCAPED CONVICT.

RE-CAPTURE OF DOOGAN THE ESCAPED CONVICT.

On Tuesday night Lawrence DOOGAN, whose recent escape from the County gaol excited so much interest in this district, was brought back to Carlisle in custody of a Manchester policeman. The particulars of his re-capture are thus given in the "Manchester Guardian" of Wednesday: ...

"On Saturday afternoon last, Robert BOHANNA, one of the Salford police beadles, being on duty in Chapel-street, was accosted by a boy, apparently about sixteen, who said he had been robbed of several pounds in money by the people where he lodged.

BOHANNA, thinking it strange that a lad of his years should have so much money, inquired how much, and the lad said, about 19 sovereigns, and £5 note. Still more astonished at hearing this amount, and noticing the boy's appearance, BOHANNA required him to go with him.

After apprehending the woman of the house where he lodged, BOHANNA was taking her and the boy to the Police Office, when the latter, finding that he was himself an object of some suspicion, wished, as he said, not to press the case, and wanted BOHANNA to release the woman and let them both go; but this only strengthened the officer's suspicions, and he conveyed both to Salford Police office.

There Mr. DIGGLES made some inquiries, in the course of the day , that the lad had changed five country bank notes of five pounds each for sovereigns, at a shop in Salford; and that a number of these sovereigns had subsequently been stolen from his room, in all probability, by the husband of the female prisoner, as he had absconded on learning that his wife was in custody.

In order to discover whether any considerable theft of bank notes had lately been committed in any part of the country, the Salford officers turned to the "Hue and Cry", and there found to their surprise that the lad whose possession of the money had excited their suspicions, was no other than Lawrence DOOGAN, "alias" Joseph HAYNES, who had escaped, as before stated from Carlisle gaol.

He had marks of the blister on his chest, which had been put on when he was placed in the hospital, whence he effected his perilous and daring escape.

On Monday he was taken before the magistrates at the Salford Town Hall, and, in consequence of their order, was conveyed on Tuesday morning to Carlisle."

We have learned further that the party with whom DOOGAN took refuge in Manchester was his aunt, who at first endeavoured to get rid of the charge made against her by saying that the boy was mad, and had only recently left a madhouse, which would also account for his hair being cut so short.

But subsequently when it was evident that the boy's intellect was in no way effected, she was heard to caution him that if he persisted in his charge she would "peach" everything.

While on his way back, DOOGAN stoutly denied that he was a runaway from Carlisle goal; but when he reached Lancaster he confessed the fact, and spoke freely of his escape. We understand he has said that he had the utmost difficulty in getting on the top of the spout, and that he made the attempt three times before he succeeded. He at last got one leg in, which went down the pipe, and so afforded him a purchase to raise himself up by.

He afterwards reached the top of the wall by a spring, as we surmised.

He has stated further that he "dropped" from the first roof to the second, but that he leaped from the next wall, which is a height of twenty feet, and that he was so shaken and exhausted when he landed in the shrubbery, that he lay for two hours before he was able to proceed.

With respect to the route by which he reached Manchester, we have not been able to learn anything that can be relied upon, his own statements being at variance with ascertained facts; but altogether his escape and flight must be considered one of the most daring on record, when it is recollected that he is not yet sixteen years of age.

It is generally supposed that the money of which DOOGAN had possessed himself was the produce of another robbery committed since the escape.



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