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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2004-07 > 1089066721


From: ellen Levy <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Jewish DNA
Date: Mon, 5 Jul 2004 15:32:01 -0700 (PDT)
In-Reply-To: <006b01c462ba$1df08e80$0b00a8c0@Minor>


Jacolyn:

How exciting! Yes, I have heard of Jews with Ib2
(Croatian) haplogroup ancestry. I am in regular
contact with someone who falls into this haplogroup
and he lives in Finland!! Is your brother of Jewish
ancestry or is there something that leads you to
suspect this?

Let me compare your brother's results with some of the
other Ib1 and 2 results and I will email you back. In
fact, I was supposed to discuss Haplogroup I ancestry
as found in Jews with a DNA researcher this week, so
should have some information for you soon on this. I
think "I" ancestry among Jews is not well-understood
and generally underreported. I've heard it falls
between 3-5%, depending on who you read. Haplogroup
Ilb is found in about 5.3% of Turks, divided up into 5
sub-clades, all likely of Balkan origin that moved
into Albania, Greece and Turkey - when, though, that
is the question. And is Jewish I results reflective
of their Anatolian origins (G, J2, etc) or was it
added to their ancestry from European gene flow, or
both?

Ellen Coffman


--- Jacolyn Perkins <> wrote:
> Ellen,
> Have you come across Ib1 or Ib2 haplogroup members
> who were questionable Jewish hertitage?
> My brother's numbers are
> 393 13
> 390 23
> 19 17
> 391 10
> 385a 12
> 385b 12
> 426 11
> 388 13
> 439 11
> 389-1 12
> 392 11
> 389-2 27
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "ellen Levy" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Monday, July 05, 2004 12:25 PM
> Subject: [DNA] Jewish DNA
>
>
> > Thought I'd change the heading of this topic, if
> > there's no objection from the List.
> >
> > Since I seem to be the one doing most of the
> postings
> > on Jewish DNA recently and it's connection to
> other
> > populations, I thought I'd explain why.
> >
> > First, it's really no different in some respects
> from
> > postings on other historical "sub-groups" such as
> > Vikings, or gypsies. The only difference I see
> with
> > the Jews as a sub-group is that they set
> themselves
> > apart based on religious lines (like the Amish)
> and
> > were forceably relocated to an area (Europe) that
> they
> > previously didn't have a lot of cultural or
> genetic
> > connections to (though that certainly changed over
> the
> > millenium, didn't it?).
> >
> > In a recent email to another on this List, I
> bemoaned
> > the loss to Jews of their cultural ties to Europe
> (and
> > vise versa), particularly in light of the some of
> the
> > DNA evidence of their European ancestry that is
> > presently available.
> >
> > Second, I think its important that someone look
> > closely at the Jewish DNA evidence because there
> are a
> > lot of non-Jewish Europeans with questions about
> their
> > J2, G and E3b haplogroups results who are
> wondering
> > how (and even if) these results connect them to
> Jewish
> > Europeans. It seems to me that there is a lot of
> > misinterpretation of the DNA evidence, some of
> which
> > is very limited. There are others on the list -
> > Melungeons for example - who have a lot of
> interest in
> > the subject as well. And we are finding a lot of
> DNA
> > evidence supporting various historical events -
> like
> > the massive conversion of Jews in Spain during the
> > Inquisition.
> >
> > And of course, there are Jewish persons who look
> to
> > this List for answers as well concerning their DNA
> > results. For instance, does Jewish Rla1 have
> Central
> > Asian roots, like the Norwegian samples, or
> Eastern
> > European?
> >
> > Additionally, there are genetic connections that I
> > don't think people would be aware of without some
> of
> > these postings (or they'd be overlooked,
> perhaps?).
> > The connection between Norwegian and Shetland
> > haplogroup Q, a very rare haplogroup, with
> Ashkenazi Q
> > seems quite interesting. They seem to be the only
> > populations in Europe who had any significant
> ancestry
> > from this particular haplogroup.
> >
> > And finally, some people find the Jews a subject
> of
> > interest, just because they may represent a
> "window on
> > history," as John Middleton so beautifully put it.
> >
> > (oh yes, and on a personal note, I am Ashkenazi
> > Jewish, so it's an obvious subject of interest for
> me.
> > However, my husband is non-Jewish and my sons are
> his
> > Rlb (follows the Rlb2 haplotype North
> German/Frisian
> > so expertly described on this list recently), so
> my
> > interests in DNA haplogroups are really quite
> varied,
> > though there are people on this list far more
> > knowledgeable about the Rlb haplogroup than I
> am!).
> >
> > Hope this addresses the issue adequately.
> >
> > Ellen Coffman
> >
> >
> > ==============================
> > Gain access to over two billion names including
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> >
>
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> >
>
>
> ==============================
> Gain access to over two billion names including the
> new Immigration
> Collection with an Ancestry.com free trial. Click
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>
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>
>


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