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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2005-03 > 1110387249


From: "ernest hurst" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Re: my genes showed 4% Native American which seems a bit odd
Date: Wed, 9 Mar 2005 11:54:09 -0500


I do believe, that the best way to deal with this nonsensical claim (as
well as another recently posted) is to ignore it. If you question them,
they will just go on, and on, and on. It's really amazing to me that anyone
with such beliefs would be subscribed to a mostly scientific list. Whatever
floats your boat, I guess.

Ernie Hurst


> [Original Message]
> From: ellen Levy <>
> To: <>
> Date: 3/9/2005 11:37:51 AM
> Subject: Re: [DNA] Re: my genes showed 4% Native American which seems a
bit odd
>
> Really? And what is the scientific and DNA EVIDENCE
> that supports such contentions (other than religious
> doctrine and the Book of Mormon, which don't
> constitute scientific evidence other than perhaps for
> some Mormons)? Enlighten me.
>
> Ellen Coffman
>
> --- wrote:
> > There is evedence of Semitic (pre-Jewish) arrivals
> > in the Western
> > Hemisphere long before Columbus. EGT
> >
> > > Could there be a genuine Jewish genetic legacy in
> > today's results of
> > > DNAPrint tests? I believe that it is possible. I
> > have previously stated
> > > on this list, that the fact that 95% of the
> > indigenous population
> > > quickly died in the early years from diseases
> > brought to the Americas
> > > post Columbus, not to mention their slavery, means
> > that the population
> > > became admixed.
> > >
> > > Is there any evidence for early Jewish
> > immigration? Yes, viz -
> > > Sephardic Genealogy Resources
> > > Some Sephardic Names Origins and meanings
> > >
> > > Name Variants Origin Meaning Notes
> > >
> > > De Soto, Del Soto Spanish Marshland
> > >
> > > Hernando De Soto
> > > Explorer and conqueror, born at Villanueva de la
> > Serena, Badajoz, Spain,
> > > 1496 or 1500; died on the banks of the Mississippi
> > the latter part of
> > > June, 1542.
> > > 1539
> > > Among the 600 men who landed near Tampa Bay,
> > Florida with the Spanish
> > > explorer Hernando de Soto were at least 100
> > Portuguese. The expedition
> > > traversed a great deal of territory, seeing parts
> > of present-day
> > > Georgia, North and South Carolina, Alabama,
> > Mississippi, Tennessee,
> > > Arkansas, and Oklahoma. Just under three years
> > after landing, on May 21,
> > > 1542, De Soto died on the banks of the
> > Mississippi. The survivors
> > > continued on to present-day Texas. Among the
> > explorers was a nobleman
> > > from Elvas, Portugal, Andr de Vasconcelos da
> > Silva, who seems to have
> > > been the leader of the Elvas group. He never
> > returned home. The oldest
> > > description of these lands is from this
> > expedition. Written in
> > > Portuguese by an anonymous Fidalgo de Elvas, or
> > Gentleman of Elvas, it
> > > was published in 1557.
> > > 1634
> > > The first documented Portuguese settler in the
> > present-day United
> > > States, Mathias de Sousa, arrived in Maryland.
> > Some believe that he was
> > > of Jewish descent.
> > > 1654
> > > On January 26, a group of 23 Portuguese Sephardic
> > Jews, who had
> > > originally fled from Portugal to the Netherlands,
> > left Recife in
> > > Pernambuco, Brazil for New Amsterdam (now
> > Manhattan, New York City) in
> > > the wake of the collapse of the Dutch colony in
> > that South American
> > > country. These refugees were the founders of the
> > first American Jewish
> > > community. During its first decades, the
> > Congregation Shearith Israel
> > > (since renamed the Spanish-Portuguese Synagogue)
> > used the Portuguese
> > > language. By the middle of the 1700s, however,
> > both Portuguese and
> > > Spanish had given way to English.
> > > 1658
> > > A group of Portuguese Jews founded the Sephardim
> > Touro Congregation in
> > > Newport, Rhode Island. Jewish Portuguese families
> > introduced the Masonic
> > > order to Newport. The synagogue was dedicated five
> > years later, making
> > > it the first synagogue in the United States.
> > >
> > > The DNAPrint subjects used to define Native
> > Americans comprised
> > > populations including Mexico.
> > > Malcolm Dodd
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > =============================New! Family Tree
> > Maker 2005. Build your
> > > tree and search for your ancestors at the same
> > time. Share your tree
> > > with family and friends. Learn more:
> > >
> >
>
http://landing.ancestry.com/familytreemaker/2005/tour.aspx?sourceid=14599&ta
rgetid=5429
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ==============================
> > Search Family and Local Histories for stories about
> > your family and the
> > areas they lived. Over 85 million names added in the
> > last 12 months.
> > Learn more: http://www.ancestry.com/s13966/rd.ashx
> >
> >
>
>
> ==============================
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