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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2005-06 > 1119727281


From: "Peter A. Kincaid" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] "Indigenous, etc."
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2005 16:21:21 -0300
References: <BAY103-F2155626051FF99BA5E591FCEEC0@phx.gbl><20050625172758.77365.qmail@web52108.mail.yahoo.com>
In-Reply-To: <20050625172758.77365.qmail@web52108.mail.yahoo.com>


I hope that DNA testing will someday let us sort
through the ethnic jigsaw of the British Isles. As
far as being able to determine what the dominant
haplogroup was in Britain at the time of the Romans,
I am also optimistic. After all these first feeters (thanks
as I like that term) had a 2-6 million population head
start on the invaders.

Best wishes!

Peter


At 02:27 PM 25/06/2005, you wrote:
>Russ:
>
>I at least appreciate your attempts to bring the
>discussion back to deep ancestry haplogroups.
>
>Yes, I provided a hypothetical scenario. That
>scenario concerned the movement of peoples into the
>British Isles, not large scale haplogroup movements
>across Europe or into Asia. This movement concerned
>Britains first inhabitants - could have been R1b and
>I, or could have been something quite different in
>terms of haplogroups. Britain, like vast parts of
>Europe, was covered by ice for extensive periods of
>time. We also have to work with the archaeological
>record for a determination of when large-scale
>habitation of Britain first began. Frankly, it could
>be a people that have been completely extinguished,
>for all I know. Could be R1b people with haplotypes
>or specific mutations that no longer exist among
>contemporary peoples. Could have been a people that
>later genetically disappear as they are absorbing wave
>after wave of newcomers.
>
>Peter believes that DNA testing will eventually be
>able to discern differences between his
>Clyde-Carlingford chambered cairn builders and the
>Bronze Age Beaker folk. Possibly, if they can DNA
>test the ancient remains of peoples clearly associated
>with these archaeological remains. But even if they
>do discern the difference, the question that is more
>important is whether they have passed on any
>discernable genetic inheritance to modern-day
>populations. I'd read the studies on ancient Basque
>remains before I'd jump to that conclusion.
>
>Ellen Coffman
>
>--- Russ _ <> wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > >From: ellen Levy <>
> > >Reply-To:
> > >To:
> > Ellen,
> >
> > You give a scenario that has R1b coming in at the
> > beginning of the Neolithic
> > Age in Western Europe. The neolithic revolution
> > moved from the east to the
> > west. However, R1b's gradient goes from west to
> > east, the opposite
> > direction.
> >
> > >Subject: Re: [DNA] "Indigenous, etc."
> > >Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2005 21:30:00 -0700 (PDT)
> > >
> >
> > >The same can be said of "aboriginal" British.
> > Let's
> > >say that Britain was inhabited initially by
> > successive
> > >waves of R1b and I around 5000 BC, then a few E3b &
> > J
> > >waves tricked in at 3000 BC, and R1a stragglers at
> > >1000 BC. Now, to the R1a invaders, E3b & J & R1b &
> > I
> > >ALL looked "indigenous." By the time the Romans
> > >invaded in the historical period, all the prior
> > >haplogroups were considered "indigenous." To say
> > that
> > >only the R1b & I were "indigenous", but the E3b
> > which
> > >has been there for 5000 years isn't is, in my
> > opinion,
> > >drawing unnecessary distinctions.
> > >
> > >Ellen Coffman
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >==============================
> > >Census images 1901, 1891, 1881 and 1871, plus so
> > much more.
> > >Ancestry.com's United Kingdom & Ireland Collection.
> > Learn more:
> > >http://www.ancestry.com/s13968/rd.ashx
> > >
> >
> >
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> > ==============================
> > Census images 1901, 1891, 1881 and 1871, plus so
> > much more.
> > Ancestry.com's United Kingdom & Ireland Collection.
> > Learn more: http://www.ancestry.com/s13968/rd.ashx
> >
> >
>
>
>
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