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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2005-06 > 1119960192


From: "CJMax" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Whoops...
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2005 07:03:23 -0500
References: <02bd01c57b94$5b6d8e90$dab4b844@Annandale> <010101c57b98$6e6f4ac0$5a579045@Ken1>


Ken,

Many thanks for your most welcomed input.

Being very new to this Y-DNA research I wasn't aware of the other data
bases. I'll check them out today. I'll keep an eye out for the M284 test
availability.

I find this Scandinavian origin very interesting. As I mentioned previously
it is in line with what the neurologist said about the neurological disease,
Sjorgrens, that my brother has - Scandinavian connected and not Scottish..
There is also some oral family history which alludes to our Johnston
connections as being somewhat a "stand alone" family within Clan
Johnston(e). In other words, although they may have been considered part of
the clan they were considered "different". This certainly may explain it.
It would be interesting to know what the original clan chiefs tested as -
the current lineage is descended through the distaff side so I gather that
testing them wouldn't give an indication of the original chief's haplogroup.
I would guess that they would test out like most others along the Borders,
R1b.

Cliff. Johnston
"May the best you've ever seen,
Be the worst you'll ever see;"
from A Scots Toast by Robert Burns
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ken Nordtvedt" <>
To: <>
Sent: Monday, June 27, 2005 11:18 PM
Subject: Re: [DNA] Whoops...


> Your haplotype looks the most like "Northern I1c" which reaches its
> highest
> concentration in Scandinavia. A lot of it got to the British Isles
> because
> of the many Scandinavian invaders/immigrants to England, Scotland,
> Ireland.
> CDY is about the fastest marker there is among the 37. Differing from
> another at this marker by itself does not mean much in genetic distance.
> It
> is consistent with a relatively recent common ancestor. How many of the
> large databases have you looked in for matches or near-matches? There are
> the Sorenson database, the Ysearch database, and Ybase database. You
> should
> check them all out.
>
> If you put all your markers into the databases seeking matches, do check
> off
> "near matches" in your search. The probability of an exact match falls
> off
> fast with many markers used. If you need help in which markers to drop
> off
> in such searches, let me know.
>
> If you are really interested in the last word in your sub-clade situation,
> there is a SNP marker M284 which indicates a sub-haplogroup to I1c.
> Northern I1c could possibly belong to this further sub-clade designation,
> and you could test to see if you are positive for M284. A new company
> will
> soon offer this test. I believe another variety of I1c called "Isles I1c"
> is most likely positive for M284, but this does not preclude that
> "Northern
> I1c" is also within this sub-clade, though I think the probability less
> because of an academic paper which studied I1c. Knowing whether you are
> positive or negative for M284 is one more division of the haplogroup
> population into smaller units, and is therefore one more step in learning
> how the original haplogroup population eventually gets broken down to our
> named ancestors of the last 15 or 20 generations. So you gain knowledge
> either way the test turns out.
>
> Ken
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "CJMax" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Monday, June 27, 2005 9:49 PM
> Subject: [DNA] Whoops...
>
>
>> Ken,
>>
>> I took the easy way out, so I thought, by copying the FTDNA page to post
> here. The joke was on me. Sorry. Here's something considerably more
> readable.
>>
>> Locus DYS # Alleles
>> 1 393 15
>> 2 390 23
>> 3 19* 15
>> 4 391 10
>> 5 385a 15
>> 6 385b 17
>> 7 426 11
>> 8 388 13
>> 9 439 11
>> 10 389-1 14
>> 11 392 12
>> 12 389-2 32
>> 13 458 14
>> 14 459a 8
>> 15 459b 10
>> 16 455 11
>> 17 454 11
>> 18 447 25
>> 19 437 14
>> 20 448 20
>> 21 449 27
>> 22 464a** 11
>> 23 464b** 14
>> 24 464c** 14
>> 25 464d** 16
>> 26 460 11
>> 27 GATA H4 11
>> 28 YCA II a 19
>> 29 YCA II b 21
>> 30 456 14
>> 31 607 14
>> 32 576 17
>> 33 570 18
>> 34 CDY a 36
>> 35 CDY b 39
>> 36 442 12
>> 37 438 10
>>
>> * AKA DYS 394
>> **On 5/19/2003, these values were adjusted down by 1 point because of a
> change in Lab nomenclature.
>>
>> I now know better than to make that mistake again.
>>
>> Yes, Ken, you hit the nail squarely on the head - I1c (or I2). I'm not
> only impressed, but also I'm very happy to gain a greater insight from
> your
> interpretation.
>>
>> One question. To date there is only one person/family close to my
> results. He has 34 - CDY a - 37 where I have a 36. What can you infer
> from
> that?
>>
>> Thanks, again,
>>
>> Cliff. Johnston
>> "May the best you've ever seen,
>> Be the worst you'll ever see;"
>> from A Scots Toast by Robert Burns
>>
>>
>> ==============================
>> Search the US Census Collection. Over 140 million records added in the
>> last 12 months. Largest online collection in the world. Learn more:
> http://www.ancestry.com/s13965/rd.ashx
>>
>>
>
>
>
> ==============================
> Search the US Census Collection. Over 140 million records added in the
> last 12 months. Largest online collection in the world. Learn more:
> http://www.ancestry.com/s13965/rd.ashx


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