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From:
Subject: Re: [DNA] MTDNA Haplogroup H - Refinement test
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2005 17:29:39 EDT


In a message dated 08/21/05 8:01:34 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
writes:

> HVR1
> 16362 = C
> 16482 = G
>
> HVR2
> 239 = C
> 263 = G
> 309.1 = C
> 315.1 = C
> (I don't really understand these last two - seems that the "C" was
> inserted, in addition to the 10 others.)


If you look at the CRS on your personal results page, or at

http://www.mitomap.org/mitoseq.html

you'll see that it has 7 C's in a row beginning at position 303 and going to
309, then there's a T, then there are 5 C's in a row (311-315). These long
sequences of C's are prone to copy errors -- they're almost like Short Tandem
Repeats on the Y chromosome, where the DNA copying process sort of loses track of
where it is. In your case there was an extra C compared to the CRS, labeled
309.1. If there were two extra C's, your result would read 309.1C, 309.2C. This
method keeps the numbering for the rest of the molecule intact.

In the case of 315.1, it is the CRS that actually has the uncommon number of
C's (one less than most people), so that lots of people end up with that
"mutation."


> I understand that Haplogroup H is about like my R1b in Y DNA, in that it is
> very common. I know very little about my "MTDNA Line" &didn't expect any
> revelations, but do these results really tell me anything other than origin
> was between 20 &35,000 years ago? Has anyone done the "H refinememt test",
> for an additional $89, and, if so, did it add anything of interest? I'm
> debating over whether to order it or not.

Yes, Haplogroup H is common, but you have additional mutations in your
haplotype which will cut down on the number of matches. How many matches do you
have?

You may or may not end up in a specific subclade if you do the H refinement
test. I'd suggest reading the papers about Haplogroup H in FTDNA's library to
see if knowing your subclade one way or another would be interesting to you.

http://www.ftdna.com/mtdnapapers.html

Ann Turner


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