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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2006-04 > 1143904747


From: "Alfred A. Aburto Jr." <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] {Bonnie} an unexpected haplogroup result
Date: Sat, 01 Apr 2006 07:20:39 -0800
References: <20060401105211.SWUV14751.omta05ps.mx.bigpond.com@Southclan>
In-Reply-To: <20060401105211.SWUV14751.omta05ps.mx.bigpond.com@Southclan>


> South wrote:

>Gary,
>
>I do understand and support the Neolithic migration, as I support the
>possibility of other migrations/ all migrations. Our topic was the possible
>inclusion of J within a related kindred which migrated pre-LGM.
>
>In terms of early migration, variables abound. A point for consideration.
>
>You wrote;
>The Neolithic migration represents the movement of J into Europe. I believe
>conventional thinking is that if you had a prior migration of J during Paleo
>times you would have a greater frequency of them in Europe.
>
>In answer;
>We know we had a migration of IJ into Europe which gave birth to I*, where
>is IJ today?
>
>

This is a bit off topic I suppose, but I noticed an interesting result
in looking at Greenspan's 12 marker CMH (CMH-12) haplotypes versus
genetic distance (GD):

CMH-12 at GD 0: I cases = 0
CMH-12 at GD 1: I cases = 0
CMH-12 at GD 2: I cases = 0
CMH-12 at GD 3: I cases = 1
CMH-12 at GD 4: I cases = 2
CMH-12 at GD 5: I cases = 44
CMH-12 at GD 6: I cases = 160

As one moves away from the CMH-12, the number of I haplotype cases
increases rapidly.
Al

>Grant South
>
>


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