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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2006-05 > 1147725176


From: "M True" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Help Please - Irish Surnames
Date: Mon, 15 May 2006 21:32:56 +0100
References: <272.a6a520e.319a3092@aol.com>


Thanks John and Jackson,

I knew a few bits of what you have told be but your research tips and
comments will be very useful.

> Fitzgerald is an easy one - Fitz Gerailt, or son of Gerald. A Norman
> surname.
> Murphy = O Murchadha. McLysaght mentions three distinct septs of the
name
> in Cork, Roscommon and Wexford. Also a Mac Murchadha in Armagh and
Tryone.

My great great grandparents Henry FitzGerald and Margaret Murphy were
married in Claremorris in 1867, where Margaret was born. Would that tend to
point to a particular Murphy sept? I have also heard there are meant to be
two types of FitzGeralds - the Norman one and a separate Gaelic branch.
Have you heard of this? If this is true would they have been possibly
followers of a FitzGerald family and through this relationship may have
adopted the name as a family surname?

> Mooney = O'Mooney (O Maonaigh). Multiple origins, in Sligo, Meeney, in
> Munster, Meaney or Mainey; also in Donegal. This last reference to
Donegal
> might explain the Ui Neill match in Ysearch.

I have managed to trace back to William Mooney b1823 Ireland in the 1841 UK
census. At that point he is living in a shared house in Gelligaer,
Glamorgan, Wales, with lots of other seemingly unrelated people. He married
Ann Hughes in Merthyr Tydfil in 1846. She was born locally. Were there
particular migration routes which people from Ireland took into
England/Wales/Scotland? Would it be likely that he landed at Cardiff to
find work in the valleys and so ended up near Merthyr? If so would this
point to a particular port of departure in Ireland and from that a possible
area of origin in Ireland? Because I know where and when they married I am
hoping the marriage certificate will give their parent's names and
occupations but I know this won't help with their origin.

> Riley probably = Reilly, or O'Reilly (O Raghailligh). Cavan and Meath.
> This is an Ui Neill surname.

I have traced back to a Patrick Riley b1820 Ireland, but have only just
started on this line. The family first appears in Staffordshire.

Thanks for the pointers

John.

----- Original Message -----
From: <>
To: <>
Sent: Monday, May 15, 2006 8:29 PM
Subject: Re: [DNA] Help Please - Irish Surnames


> In a message dated 5/15/2006 1:39:43 P.M. Central Standard Time,
> writes:
>
> Can some of our Irish Genealogical experts help please. I have recently
> received my DNA Tribes results and this has sparked me on to researching
all
> of my grandparent's lines one of which is Irish. The surnames I would
like
> some background information on are:
>
> Riley
> Mooney
> Murphy
> FitzGerald
>
> Fitzgerald is an easy one - Fitz Gerailt, or son of Gerald. A Norman
> surname.
>
> Mooney = O'Mooney (O Maonaigh). Multiple origins, in Sligo, Meeney, in
> Munster, Meaney or Mainey; also in Donegal. This last reference to
Donegal
> might explain the Ui Neill match in Ysearch.
>
> Riley probably = Reilly, or O'Reilly (O Raghailligh). Cavan and Meath.
> This is an Ui Neill surname.
>
> Murphy = O Murchadha. McLysaght mentions three distinct septs of the
name
> in Cork, Roscommon and Wexford. Also a Mac Murchadha in Armagh and
Tryone.
>
> Any good genealogical library should have several books on Irish surnames
> you can check for more information. MacLysaght has several (Irish Family
> Names, Surnames of Ireland, More Irish Family Names). An earlier work by
Woulfe
> is "Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall", which McLysaght used heavily as a source.
O
> Lochlainn's "Irish Families Great and Small" is another source. If you
have
> some idea where your ancestors came from in Ireland you might be able to
get
> some idea of which group your family belonged to.
>
> I did a quick check from the Griffith's CD on Mooney and this surname is
> literally everywhere in Ireland, from north to south, east and west.
There are
> probably a huge number of different, unrelated families that assumed this
> surname to have such a large geographical distribution, certainly more
origins
> than MacLysaght mentioned..
>
> A lot of genealogical libraries will also have a copy of this Griffith's
> Valuation CD, which gives heads of household in mainly rural areas of
Ireland c.
> 1848. Unfortunately the CD is missing data here and there - in a few
cases,
> entire parishes are missing. It's mainly useful as a curiosity - you can
> use it to see how widespread certain surnames are. For real genealogical
work
> though you'd need to order the actual Griffith's on microfilm from the
LDS.
>
>
> John
>
>
>
> ==============================
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>


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