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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2006-08 > 1154651252


From: Hal Whitmore <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] research strategy for genealogists
Date: Thu, 03 Aug 2006 20:27:32 -0400
In-Reply-To: <REME20060803191519@alum.mit.edu>


on 8/3/06 7:20 PM, John Chandler at wrote:

> If she does, then go
> directly to the most distant cousins available. With three mutually
> distant cousins tested in all, it should be possible to reconstruct
> the haplotype of the MRCA. Going beyond that to a full cladogram for
> all descendants of the MRCA is not going to help anybody, except those
> who test out *not* to be descendants after all. (And they won't
> necessarily be grateful for the "help". Believe me.)
>
> John Chandler
>

John,

I had thought that doing some of both would be useful and allow us, perhaps,
to define certain mutations to various lines. But, I came up with these
results which don't seem terribly useful. All six mutations are unique to
the individual (and/or his line)


Ancestor 1615-1681

Son 4 Son 5 Son 7

X x X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X X

X X X X X X

X X X X X X

X X X X X 6

X 2 3 4 5

1



1 and 4 = 37 out of 37 match = Ancestor's haplotype

2 one one step mutation

3 two one step mutations

5 one one step mutation

6 two one step mutations

I am still trying for descendants of two or three other sons of the
"founder" but was also going to look for another closer cousin or two in the
first two lines. Do you think that is a waste of time and money?


Hal



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