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From: "Alfred A. Aburto Jr." <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Haplogroup J2 origins
Date: Thu, 28 Sep 2006 13:10:27 -0700
References: <BAY122-F36C45EC116F7E1A6C17308DA1B0@phx.gbl>
In-Reply-To: <BAY122-F36C45EC116F7E1A6C17308DA1B0@phx.gbl>


Jackson,
Thanks for the link. Sengupta does show the strongest J2a "source"
frequency in the Balkans (actually just across the Sea of Marmara).

For the diversity I think it is too soon and too close to call the
Balkans as the origin of J2 particularly since the error bounds are not
known (0.52 compared to 0.50 or even 0.47 or ?). It could very well be
Anatolia/Turkey is the source. Also there is no Y-STR diversity data for
the Black & Caspian Sea areas.

But as Sengupta (a 2006 paper) says there is more data and study yet needed.
Al


> Jackson Montgomery-Devoni wrote:

> Hi Al,
>
> Thank you very much for the paper, I will be reading them sometime
> tonight.
>
>> From what I am reading it seems that possibly the Fertile Crescent
>> (Eastern
>
> Mediterranean) area may not actually be the true source of J2a, but
> then again it very well still could be.
>
> Diversity may show some clues though and I have read a few things on
> Dienekes Pontikos's blog that says the diversity of J2 is greater in
> the Balkans and Anatolia than in the Middle East.
>
> Here is a link
> http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2006/01/str-variance-of-haplogroup-j2-in.html
>
>
>
> Cheers,
> Jackson
>
>> From: "Alfred A. Aburto Jr." <>
>> Reply-To:
>> To:
>> Subject: Re: [DNA] Haplogroup J2 origins
>> Date: Thu, 28 Sep 2006 07:16:27 -0700
>>
>> Hi Jackson,
>> I'm sending Sengupta's paper shortly and an Excel file of his data.
>>
>> Still though, despite genetic drift of the people from Kazbegi, that
>> whole area north of Iran and south of the Black Sea and between the
>> Black and Caspian Seas is a source for J2a. This is clear to me from
>> Sengupta's paper. Also connecting the hot spot between the Black &
>> Caspian Seas and the hot spot in the midlands of Turkey (Anatolia?) is a
>> huge valley (I can see it on my world wall map at home but I don't know
>> what it is called).
>>
>> It is true also that looking more carfully at Sengupta's Figure 3 that
>> the Levant looks like another source, but it is a very narrow one
>> (squished by the Mediterranen Sea and the deserts east) so it doesn't
>> show up dramatically as do the other strong sources (including Italy).
>>
>> The Fertile Crescent area doesn't look like a source in general at all,
>> except for that area called the Levant (that narrow strip of the Fertile
>> Crescent along the Eastern Shores of the Mediterranean Sea).
>> Al
>>


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