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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2007-06 > 1181625941


From: ahunt <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] The People of the Lightning: Fir Bolg and Belgae/Excalibur
Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 22:25:41 -0700
References: <20070612045911.BQFB20226.oaamta04ps.mx.bigpond.com@DINOSAUR>
In-Reply-To: <20070612045911.BQFB20226.oaamta04ps.mx.bigpond.com@DINOSAUR>


August Hunt, (1960), published his first short stories in his high
school newspaper, THE WILDCAT WIRES. These were followed by stories and
poems in THE PHOENIX literary magazine of Clark Community College, where
he received a writing scholarship. Transferring to THE EVERGREEN STATE
COLLEGE in Olympia, WA, he continued to publish pieces in local
publications and was awarded the Edith K. Draham literary prize. A few
years after graduating in 1985 with a degree in Celtic and Germanic
Studies, he published The Road of the Sun: Travels of the Zodiac Twins
in Near Eastern and European Myth
<http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0911437401/robertsarthurian>;.
Magazine contributions include a cover article on the ancient Sinaguan
culture of the American Southwest for Arizona Highways. His first novel,
"Doomstone
<http://www.double-dragon-ebooks.com/single.asp?isbn=1-89484-138-7&genre>";,
and the anthology "From Within the Mist
<http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0000YSGEI/robertsarthurian>"; are
being offered by Double Dragon (ebook and paperback). A screenplay
entitled "The Perfect Gunfighter" is in development with Cinema Classics
of Burbank, CA. August, a member of the International Arthurian
Society, North American Branch, has most recently had his book "Shadows
in the Mist: The Life and Death of King Arthur" accepted for publication
by Hayloft Publishing in October 2005. Now being written is a series of
novels that will go under the general heading of "Starkad's Saga", a
fantasy/adventure about the ultimate Viking warrior.


Comments to: August Hunt <mailto:>


Not Alan Hunt

=)

I had to check.

Allen Hunt


quinn wrote:

>Hello John, Peter, Elizabeth,
>
>
>
>I quite liked my atlatl/spear thrower theory but...
>
>
>
>Arthur's Excalibur is Caledfwlch in welsh. Fergus'(+Maeve) sword was
>Caladbolg. Maybe same story really.
>
>
>
>See:
>
>
>
>The Stone of Enloch and Arthur's Sword by Alan Hunt at
>http://www.geocities.com/vortigernstudies/articles/guestdan11.htm
>
>
>
>Arthur's Excalibur is Caledfwlch in welsh. Fergus'(+Maeve) sword was
>Caladbolg. Maybe same story really.
>
>
>
>
>
>"Much in the past has been made of the fact that the early Welsh name for
>Arthur's sword, Caledfwlch, appears to be cognate with that of the famous
>sword of the Irish hero Fergus mac Roich, Caladbolg. Various etymologies
>have been proposed for both swords, but given the qualities ascribed to
>them, the most reasonable derives the name from calad/caled, "hard", and
>-bolg, "lightning", cognate with L. fulg-. Derivations which take -bolg to
>mean "gap/cleft" (cf. W. bwlch) create a sword name that is nonsensical,
>i.e. a gap or cleft cannot be hard, nor can a sword be a gap or cleft. A
>later form of the name, Caladcholg or "Hard-sword" (Early Irish cholg =
>"sword"), is thought to be a clerical alteration of the original name."
>
>And:
>
>
>
>"Caledfwlch [ka- led -vulkh] masculine noun
>
>1 (mythology) name of Arthur's sword (the Welsh name is the origin of the
>somewhat distorted Latin form "Caliburnus", which in turn is the origin of
>the English name "Excalibur")
>
>ETYMOLOGY: "(weapon of) hard slashing / cutting", hard thruster, hard
>cleaver, etc (caled = hard) + soft mutation + (bwlch = cut, gap, breach)"
>
>
>
>And:
>
>
>
>"Subject: Re: Caladbolg
>
>From: Christopher Gwinn <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Reply-To: Scholars and students of Old Irish <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2001 14:02:18 -0500
>
>Content-Type: text/plain
>
>
>
>The DIL mentions that Caladbolg is a general name for any death-dealing
>
>sword (it also appears as Caladcolg "Hard-sword" in some manuscripts of the
>
>Tain).
>
>It is usually taken to represent Calad "hard" + Bolg "gap/cleft" (thus
>
>"Hard-cleft" - note Welsh Caledfwlch from Caled "hard" + bwlch "gap"),
>
>though it may be related to bolg "swelling/blister/boss/ball" from a Proto
>
>Indo European root meaning "to swell". I believe that the meaning
>
>"lightning" for bolg is in doubt these days.
>
>
>
>-Chris Gwinn"
>https://listserv.heanet.ie/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0103&L=old-irish-l&D=0&I=-3&P=10
>813
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>Sounds like Caladbolg is a charioteer/cavalryman's slashing sword.
>
> It is curious that the Arthurian legend is set around Winchester in
>England and his weapon was "Caledfwlch":
>
>"After the Claudian invasion of Britain in 43CE the Atrebates were ruled as
>a client-kingdom of Rome under Cogidubnus (Tiberius Claudius Cogidubnus).
>There is some speculation that Cogidubnus may even have been raised in Rome.
>
>Later the Atrebatic kingdom was split into three parts, with the capital of
>the Atrebates at Silchester, the Belgae at Winchester, and the Regini at
>Chichester." http://www.britainexpress.com/History/prehistory/atrebates.htm
>
>So Arthur of the Belgae.
>
> Quite like the idea that the Bolg was a slashing sword. And that Arthur and
>Fergus had the same immortal sword from the Lady of the Lake and returned it
>when the deeds were done.
>
>
>
>Check out picture of 600 bce iron sword from Netherlands. Sword is bent- a
>symbolic return to the Gods?
>
>
>
>http://home.zonnet.nl/postbus/pics2.html
>
>
>
>Strange but decoration is just like Z shapes on Pictish stones.
>http://www.pictart.org/craftsmen.htm
>
>
>
>( my search for a spear thrower took me to the tuning fork shape of the
>Picts- someone wrote it was Excalibur in the stone, but reckon most of those
>things are male and female symbols)
>
>
>
>Brian Quinn
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
>Message: 1
>
>Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 00:44:10 -0300
>
>From: "Peter A. Kincaid" <>
>
>Subject: Re: [DNA] The People of the Lightning: Fir Bolg and Belgae
>
>To: <>
>
>Message-ID: <001901c7abda$c8473ac0$>
>
>Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
>
> reply-type=original
>
>
>
>I personally believe that "men of lightning" is what is meant
>
>but not for the reasons that you cite. I think that the Fir
>
>Bolg are those that came to Ireland as part of the Atlantic
>
>amber trade
>
>
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