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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2008-09 > 1220907396


From: "Ken Nordtvedt" <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Age of R1b
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2008 14:56:36 -0600
References: <47325.24414.qm@web86606.mail.ird.yahoo.com><005d01c910f4$724f8b10$6400a8c0@Ken1><9241E62E-73B8-4B15-9D7C-CBDD1120F21E@vizachero.com><ea3bd9560809071022o3fe7866am25309934da0b7fe6@mail.gmail.com><AA3C4803-8BE8-4458-B9C5-C1A896684D34@vizachero.com><246baaff0809081351j7f50cbaaw1831430e96e78496@mail.gmail.com>


Prolificity! and lack thereof or extinctions of other lines.

Why is I1 probably the most populous subhaplogroup of I in spite of being
about the last to "start" and furthest geographically from the origins of I?
Same answer

I better be careful; someone might take a census and show that I2a1-Dinaric
(M423+) is as populous as I1. But it "started" even more recently.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Havelock Vetinari" <>
To: <>
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2008 2:51 PM
Subject: Re: [DNA] Age of R1b


> If R1b is so young then why is it the most common haplogroup in Europe?
>
> Regards,
>
> Paul D.
>
> On 9/7/08, Vincent Vizachero <> wrote:
>> It isn't, David, and that's the whole point. It is too young to have
>> existed pre-LGM. It doesn't just look young. It IS young.
>
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