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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-02 > 1265838084


From: Vincent Vizachero <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] News item: first ancient human genome sequenced
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2010 16:41:24 -0500
References: <e4dd.3fa9ee07.38a46414@aol.com><626848.42645.qm@web112416.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>
In-Reply-To: <626848.42645.qm@web112416.mail.gq1.yahoo.com>


According to the paper, the number of "high-quality" SNPs was much
lower than that: less than 500.

"For the Saqqaq Y chromosome, we found 23 homozygote (versus 243
with the haploid model) and 445 heterozygote high-confidence
SNPs. We explain the latter by the well-known fact that human Y
chromosomes are difficult to assemble due to structural and repetitive
regions22. Importantly, the number of heterozygote SNPs found
in the X and Y chromosomes when changing to the diploid model are
similar to those from modern human genome sequencing (Supplementary
Information)."

In fact, the genome sequencing itself failed to even confirm the
sample as Q. They had to resort to regular PCR/cloning to test for
MEH2, M346, M3, M216, and M242.

Vince



On Feb 10, 2010, at 3:07 PM, Larry Vick wrote:

> For those who are interested, p. 33 of the supplementary material
> says he was Y haplogroup Q1a. I hope the 4,024 newly revealed SNPs
> will be useful for discovering new sub-clades in haplogroup Q.


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