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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-02 > 1266982896


From: tewilder <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Autosomal Matches - Ancestor Tracing - Example
Date: Tue, 23 Feb 2010 21:41:36 -0600
References: <mailman.6740.1266969388.2099.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>
In-Reply-To: <mailman.6740.1266969388.2099.genealogy-dna@rootsweb.com>


It occurred to me today, that there is a simple approach to my problem
of four people matching on the same segment of chromosome 8

The are the people who match my father are:

Comparison Chromosome Start point End point Genetic distance # SNPs
A) New England 8 11000000 15000000 8.5 cM 1556
B) Anabaptist Project 8 11000000 15000000 8.5 cM 1608
C) New England - New York 8 12000000 16000000 7.0 cM 1835

Here is the only match against me:
New England - New York 8 12000000 16000000 6.5 cM 1748
and
Timothy Wilder vs. Earl Wilder 3545 cM 23, which is 23andMe's
way of expressing half-identical on 22 chromosomes, apparently. They
have a little gray spot on their graph of Chromosome 17 so they count
that as two segments.

Now, if the first three were all on the same segment shouldn't I match
all three like my father does? So maybe the matches to my father are on
different copies of the chromosome?

The lastest run from the Anabaptist project produced three more matches
to my father.

Name Chromosome Start Stop cM #SNPs
E) vs. Earl Wilder 4 163623241 175404658 13.5 2071
Mennonite Project (Has 19th century Egli ancestry from Baden, across
the river from Alsace) F) vs
Earl Wilder 15 24428917 28723577 11 704 Mennonite
Project
G) vs Earl Wilder 16 59630694 75400458 14.6 2573
Mennonite Project (Has ancestry in Baden)
In addition frome 23andMe there is:
H) vs Earl Wilder X 115000000 124000000 17 1031 (20th
century Egli ancestry)

Since this last one is on the X it has to go back to Alsace to people
born there in the 1850s. The father of one of them was known to have
worked in Strasbourg, where one branch of this Egli Mennonite family
lived. Also there were Eglis in Mulhouse where this ancestor lived when
his daughter was born. I know his father's name, but not his mother's or
grandmother's.

So I tentatively conclude there there may have been two Mennonite
connections, but a least one was an Alsace/Baden one, maybe Egli, and it
probably has nothing to do with that C) New England - New York match on
8, where there is a known 17th century common ancestor from England.

A and C share a different 17th century ancestor, and I thought I had
found a second more recent one, but it turned out to be in C's husband's
line, not her's. Anyway, this does not seem to be the reason for this
match.

Is this sound reasoning?

> /From:/ <mailto:>
> /Subject:/ Re: [DNA] Autosomal Matches - Ancestor Tracing - Example
> /Date:/ Tue, 26 Jan 2010 12:42:25 EST
> I'd suggest asking the three matches to see if they all match everyone
> else. Your father's matches might not all come from the same
> chromosome. If they
> do come from the same chromosome, then you've identified a stretch
> from 110
> to 160 Mb that came from the common ancestor, with different lines of
> descent chopping up the segment in different places.
>
> Ann Turner
>
>
> In a message dated 1/26/2010 9:07:09 AM Pacific Standard Time,
> <mailto:> writes:
>
> > I have a practical example and puzzle from the 23andMe Relative Finder
> > matching:
> >
> > These three people share a segment with my father:
> >
> > Comparison Chromosome Start point End point Genetic distance # SNPs
> > New England 8 11000000 15000000 8.5 cM 1556
> > Anabaptist Project 8 11000000 15000000 8.5 cM 1608
> > New England - New York 8 12000000 16000000 7.0 cM 1835
> >
> > Does this mean that my father has a more recent ancestor than the ones
> > share with these three people who has the whole block of chromosome 8
> > from 8 11000000 16000000, or is there a significant chance that this is
> > some accidentally juxtaposed DNA that is looks like a continuous string?



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