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Archiver > GENEALOGY-DNA > 2010-03 > 1267643510


From: Charles Hollenbeck <>
Subject: Re: [DNA] Danish "homeland" of Viking Era emigrants to EasternEngland and Normandy
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 2010 11:11:50 -0800
References: <ea3bd9561003021130r7ce1e8c0na0195ecbc243dd3f@mail.gmail.com><65a020c81003021236v3ecebd20k461c17eb45a6e95b@mail.gmail.com><ea3bd9561003030909m6e283ac6s7bf25d3bcde8f2ed@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <ea3bd9561003030909m6e283ac6s7bf25d3bcde8f2ed@mail.gmail.com>


On Wed, Mar 3, 2010 at 9:09 AM, David Faux <> wrote:

> Charlie,
>
> Yes, I thought the same thing, but what little evidence we have (noted in
> my
> manuscript on the Angles) would point the finger at the Saxons for engaging
> in "ethnic cleansing". The Jutes provide the first "Anglo-Saxon" kings of
> Kent though, and I expect that while R-U152 will be very spotty in the
> south
> and particularly the southwest of England (so spotty that there is
> virtually
> none to date), while there "should" be some in Kent (which is the case).
> If
> it is found in the Isle of Wight this could be important in suggesting that
> the Saxons only exterminated the elite of the Jutes settled there, but left
> the "common people" be.
>
"ethnic cleansing"? Isn't this what was meant by "scourging"? What was
the provocation, and when did it occur? And where the Frisians, who
co-settled with the Jutes (especially on the Isle of Wight) left unmolested?

I looked at a website yesterday (your's) that contained the data used to
'pin'
your map. I see what you mean about R-U152 being "spotty in the south".
But then, the sample from that area seems to be rather small.

On a different note:


> ...The evidence is consistent with the historical and archaeological data
> indicating a complete en masse movement of the Angles of the southern tier
> of Jutland to England.
>
Gregory of Tours states that, on the continent, the Angles were a sub-tribe
of the
Saxons. This was in a description of the composition of the Saxon
population at
the time of Charlemagne's wars against them. Apparently there was still a
rump
population of Angles hanging around as late as the Carolingian Period, and
in their
old territory. If these Angles had moved elsewhere, say into Saxon
territory, the
Germans would probably have used the term "Angeln" to refer to this new
homeland
instead of the old one in eastern Schleswig.


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